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Full text of "Sponsor"

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GENERAL UBRARy 
>° OOCKEFlLUn PUZA, HEW 



VOW, H. Y, 



JULY 1949 • $8.00 a Year 





Millions of uncounted listeners — p. 19 

The per-inquiry problem — p. 24 

Whef&QfehV<£rUdentification fails— p. 27 

JUL 7 Bin fe£f" s oran9e ' uice ~ p - 22 



Microphone and audiences go outdoors for 4 July— p. 19 



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A N 2 XbOA W3N 

VZVId cl31"13 J3X00U 02 

iN I lSVD0VOc)8 TVN0I1VN 

3n0VWdS S30NVHJ SSIW 

02 28 1 6tr-0l dS 



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m^m^r^rm^MW^rm^^^NA^ii £nfin£g^r^:ifri£fo^^ 



DECLARATION 

of an 

INDEPENDENT 

• • 

WHHM believes... 

JL 10 dT a station serves best which gives its audience music, news, 
and sports in balance. 

J. U&T the satisfaction of a contented listener is riches beyond com- 
pare. 

JL lOdT an alert staff, coupled with responsible management, can't 
help but produce pleasant listening. 

J. rJClT a progressive station is both friendly and cooperative. 

_/. rOdT it is the reaction of its audience, expressed in Hooper ratings 
of listenership, phone calls, and letters, that helps build a 
loyal audience. 

JL rd&T service to its audience is what makes a station great . . . 
and listened to . . . and believed in 

m WHHM 

Independent — But Not Aloof 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



RECETVTF 
JUL 7 1949 



4 July 1949 



Walcott-Charles 

fight plays to 

SRO 



Bendix-WNEW 

sells $3,800,000 

homes 



"The Shadow" 
sold to Grove-Fitch 



Networks to report 

on anti-recession 

moves 



Transcription 

availabilities 

continue up 



Contests and 

promotions to be 

ripe this fall 



Ziv gets raves 
for "Menjous" 



Theater-TV is becoming better and better. RCA is actively pushing 
direct (no film) system in competition with Paramount-DuMont ' s film 
device. All theaters TV-showing Walcott-Charles fight (22 June) 
played to standing room only. 

-SR- 

Because homes in Levittown are Bendix Washer equipped, Bendix com- 
mercials on WNEW for entire week were devoted to homes for sale in 
this giant development. Result: 433 homes (all that were available 
at time) sold. Another two days of Bendix-Levitt commercials brought 
1,500 requests for applications for homes yet to be built. Cash 
involved in direct sales was $3,800,000. 

-SR- 

First national purchase by Grove Laboratories of time since Grove 
bought F. W. Fitch Company is 400-station MBS network for "The 
Shadow." Grove and Fitch products will share commercials. 

-SR- 

All four networks will have anti-recession broadcasts this summer. 
"Talent" will run gamut from Charles Luckman (Lever Brothers) to 
Professor Dan Smith (Harvard School of Business Administration) . All 
will preach "understanding the causes of present business slow 
down. " 

-SR- 

Pointing up transcription industry's firm belief in radio's ex- 
pansion, WMGM (N. Y.) announced that, starting 1 September, 8 big 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer-produced series will be available on disks. 
Stars like Lionel Barrymore, Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich, 
Lew Ayres, and properties like "Maisie," "Dr. Kildare," "Crime Does 
Not Pay," and "Judge Hardy's Family" are scheduled for plattering. 

-SR- 

Practically all major manufacturers will run contest and promo- 
tions between 1 August and 1 November. From candy to refrigerators 
and automobiles, there will be jingle and other air stunts which 
will pay off, it's hoped, in increased product sales. More products 
will also be available for give-away programs. 

-SR- 

Frederic Ziv's "The Menjous," first of top-drawer-transcribed 
Mr. and Mrs. programs, has been receiving outstanding newspaper 
reviews that ignore fact that it's on disk. New York Times' Jack 
Gould gave it rave. 



SPONSOR. Volume 3, No. 10, 4 July 194!). Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. 32nd and Elm. Baltimore 1. Md. Advertising. Editorial. Circulation OfBces 
40 W. 52 St.. N. Y. 19. N.Y. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. post office under Act 3 March 1879. 



4 JULY 1949 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . .SPONSOR 



Network-TV 

Hooperatings are 

released 



Nearly 3,000,000 

new AM radio sets 

up to 1 June 1949 



Pulse reports 

N. Y. sets-in-use 

up 



Cushman's and 
A&P buy TV time 



Farm income not 

much below 1948 

peak 



Network-TV Hooperatings are a fact. New York section of industry- 
introduced to them 28 June, while rest of nation will hear them 
explained in series of cross-country meetings. Both TV-based home 
ratings and random-sample ratings are included in report, which 
assembled greatest collection of TV-rating data ever presented. 
Hooper is standing 95% of cost of making first report with only 
17 charter subscribers. 

-SR- 

Nearly 3,000,000 AM radio sets were produced this year up to 
1 June, with Radio Manufacturers' Association members alone re- 
porting 2,586,135. RMA members produced 181,803 auto radios and 
132,091 portables in May. 

-SR- 

Average radio sets in use in New York City per quarter-hour from 
6 a.m. to midnight was up in June from May-June a year ago accord- 
ing to Pulse. This, despite fact that New York is TV's number one 
area. Average quarter-hour figure was 23.7%. Comparative figure for 
May year ago was 22.6%, June 21.2%. 

-SR- 

Two firms that haven't used radio to any extent in years are tele- 
casting. A&P is buying spot on DuMont's Kathi Norris program and 
Cushman's Sons has bought Harry Goodman's weather puppets for 
WABD five times a week. 

-SR- 

Farm income, despite Eastern drought, will not be much below 1948 
peak rate of $31,000,000,000. There is even a possibility that 
it may hit 1948 peak, although that is remote at this time. 

—Please turn to page 34— 



IN THIS ISSUE 



capsuled highlights 



Uncounted millions listen to broadcasting page 19 
all year 'round. For the first time in radio his- 
tory, SPONSOR gives some idea of this tre- 
mendous bonus audience. 

Orange juice salesman, Bing Crosby, helps page 22 
build a one product business in competition 
with the great food corporations of America. 

It's more than a matter of ethics, the prob- page 24 
lem of per-inquiry broadcasting. Some spon- 
sors just don't want time on a station that has 
a great deal of direct-selling business. 

Sponsor identification does not always mean page 27 
sales. Some sponsors do an amazing job with 
practically no listeners knowing who sponsors 
their programs. 



Regional networks, without telephone line page 30 
connections, may solve state-wide market cover- 
age for advertisers. Two FM-served networks 
(Alabama and Oklahoma) are developing the 
new formula. 

$400,000 in TV sets is one month record that page 48 
a dealer set through using TV advertising to 
reach prospects. 

IN NEXT ISSUE 



Fall Forecast for every business that uses 
radio, TV, or other form of broadcasting. 

Film sources for all forms of TV advertising. 

Transcription index for selective advertising. 

Fall Facts, it's the name of, and it's the con- 
tents of, SPONSOR'S next issue. 



18 July 

18 July 
18 July 
18 July 



SPONSOR 



WlMN. . . SPONSORS REPORT . 



SPONSORS REPORT . . 



Occasionally one feels like sitting back and evaluating the 
gains made over a course of years. 

When I consider that virtually our entire advertising budget for 
this area is concentrated in our twice-daily Frank Hemingway 
newcasts on the Intermountain Network, certainly KALL and the 
other stations comprising this network are entitled to an 
expression of thanks on my part. 

There is no question in my mind but that our fine sales gains of 
the last couple of years are due largely to the widespread audience 
that this network has been able to capture for Hemingway. 

In addition, the individual stations of your network have been 
most cooperative in handling special merchandising campaigns, such 
as our "Folger's Coffee Week" promotion, to the end that substan- 
tial sales gains have been made locally in every instance. 

All of which is merely my way of saying that the Intermountain 
Network rates tops as an advertising vehicle for Folger's 
Coffee. So keep up the excellent work of the past. 



21 HOME TOWN MARKETS COMPRISE 
THE INTERMOUNTAIN NETWORK 



UTAH 


WYOMING 


KALL, Salt Lake City 


KVRS, Rock Springs 


KLO, Ogden 


KOWB, Laramie 


KOVO, Provo 


KDFN, Casper 


KOAL, Price 


KWYO, Sheridan 


KVNU, Logan 


KPOW, Powell 


KSVC, Richfield 




KSUB, Cedar City 


MONTANA 


IDAHO 


KBMY, Billings 
KRJF, Miles City 


KFXD, Boise-Nampa 


KMON, Great Falls 


KFXD-FM, Boise-Nampa 


KOPR, Butte 


KVMV, Twin Falls 




KEYY, Pocatello 


NEVADA 


KID, Idaho Falls 


KRAM, Las Vegas 



THE 



New York 



J. L. MOORE, Sales Manager, 
J. A. FOLGER & CO. 

MSRMOUNTAfN 
^N|TWORK?„ £ 



I'cago 



'' 'nc. 

lo. Ang.f, 



Nat.onaJ Rep 



resentatives 



San f, 



4 JULY 1949 



m w® 



VOL 3 



UO-A6 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

NEW AND RENEW 

OUTLOOK 

MR. SPONSOR: CHARLES H. PERCY 

P.S. 

THE BIG PLUS 

BING CROSBY AND MINUTE MAID 

PER-INQUIRY PROBLEM 

WHEN PRESSES STOP ROLLING 

SPONSOR IDENTIFICATION 

NO TELEPHONE LINES 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

SCIENTIFIC SALESMAN 

4-NETWORK TV COMPARAGRAPH 

TV RESULTS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 
4 
9 
12 
14 
16 
19 
22 
24 
26 
27 
30 
36 
43 
48 
51 
56 
62 
62 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Executive. Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 
Street. New York 10. N. Y. Telephone: Plaza 3-K216. 
Chicago Office: 3110 N. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Fin- 
ancial 1556. Publication Offices: 32nd and Elm, Baltimore. 
Md. Subscriptions: United States $8 a year, Canada $9. 
Single copies 50c. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1949 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. 
Koehler. Associate Editors: Frank Bannister. Charles 
Sinclair. Dan Richman. Researcher: Stella Brauner. Art 
Director: Howard Wechsler. Advertising Director: Lester 
I. Blumenthal. Advertising Department: M. H. LeBlang: 
Beatrice Turner; (Chicago Manager) Jerry Glynn Jr.: (l.os 
Angeles) Duncan A. Scott & Co.. 2978 Wilshire Blvd.: 
(San Francisco) Duncan A. Scott & Co.. Mills Bldg. 
Circulation Manager: Milton Kaye. Circulation Depart- 
menti Marcia Chinitz. Emily Cutilln. Secretary to 
Publisher: Augusta Shearman. 

I <>\ i k PICTURE: t July Mails the greal outdoor Ilsten- 

M pe i i"i broadcasting, 



40 West 52nd 



TV RESULTS 

It was particularly gratifying to 
notice the West Coast's representation 
in sponsor's 99 TV Results report. The 
sponsor being the $64 question in TV, 
I think this report comes under the 
heading of public service to the indus- 
try. The TV producer has got to keep 
mighty close to the sponsor to see how 
his video thinking-cap fits and how TV 
can make merchandise move. The TV 
producer has also got to do some heavy 
thinking about how to make the spon- 
sor's investment in television pay off, 
both well and soon. 

In other words, the TV packager 
and producer should never miss an 
issue of sponsor. 

Mal Boyd 

President 

Television Producers Ass'n. 

Hollyivood 



UP-TO-DATE SOURCE 

May I request permission to quote 
from articles in sponsor in my forth- 
coming publication on radio and tele- 
vision advertising for McGraw-Hill? 
I've found SPONSOR an up-to-date 
source of information on the industry 
and extremely helpful for" instructional 
purposes. 

Full credit will be given in the foot- 
notes to SPONSOR as the source of data. 
E. F. Seehafer 
Ass't. Prof, of Journalism 
University of Minnesota 
Minneapolis 

Permission has been granted Professor Seehafer. 



SUMMER ISSUE HELPFUL 

Congratulations on your summer- 
time edition. We have looked over the 
copies and made notes, and I think 
that there are some very good articles 
and also statistics in here which we 
will try to use to good advantage. 

Incidentally, here's a suggestion 
( and I hope you don't think I am for- 
ward in making this). Why not sug- 
gest to the radio stations throughout 
the nation that they brief down some 
of these facts to a line or two and 
insert them in their local newspaper 
ads and other forms of promotion. 
{Please turn to page 6) 



ONE STATION 

in Houston 
leads all ^ v 
others 




To sell Houston 
and the great 
Gulf Coast area 



Buy KPRC 

FIRST 

in Everything 
that Counts 

IS* HOUSTON 

950 KILOCYCLES. 5000 WATTS 

NBC and TON on the Gulf Coast 

Jack Harris, General Manager 

Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Co. 



How are 
your sales in.. 






Increase your sales in this six billion dollar market. 
Hitch your sales curve to WGAR . . . and watch it soar! 

and here's why: 

WGAR is consistently the leader in regular audience 
reports . . .WGAR ratings exceed national averages 
. . . v^GAR is the only Cleveland radio station to 
have gained listeners over last year . . . Vv GAR has 
nine of the top fifteen daytime programs . . . vf^GAR 
has eight of the top fifteen evening programs . . . more 
than all other Cleveland stations combined! 



Add to this the fact that WGAR has the strongest, most 
listenable signal of any Cleveland station in Cleveland, in 
Akron, and in Canton! Here you have an open door to an 
assured audience in a rich market area. To sell them . . . 
simply tell them your sales story through Cleveland's 
Friendly Station. 



Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Co. 



4 JULY 1949 



WFBL 

SYRACUSE, N.Y 






AVERAGE RATINGS 






Dec. 1948 thru April 1949 






Weekday 


— Monday thru Friday 






WFBL 


Station Station Station 
BCD 


Station 
E 


Morning 


8.15 


4.57 3.61 1.80 


.72 


Afternoon 


6.17 


3.94 3.63 2.26 


1.83 


All Day 


7.16 


4.26 4.26 2.03 


1.28 




S&aie 


o£ s4udteKce 






WFBL 


Station Station Station 
BCD 


Station 
E 


Morning 


43.4 


24.6 19.7 7.9 


3.6 


Afternoon 


36.1 


21.9 19.6 12.9 


9.0 


Evening 
Sun. thru Sat. 


27.9 


21.7 27.6 12.6 


8.1 


C. E. 


HOOPER WINTER- SPRING REPORT, 1949 






WED BE GLAD 

to show you the complete quarter- 
hour breakdown — just call . . . 

Free & Peters, inc. 

Exclusive National 
Representatives 




WFBL 



BASIC 

SINCE 

1927 



IN SYRACUSE . . . THE NO. 1 STATION 
WITH THE TOP SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
MORNING, AFTERNOON OR EVENING 



40 West 52nd 



( Continued from page 4) 

giving sponsor credit wherever pos- 
sible. 

I think that the job now started by 
NAB is splendid, but I think also it 
must go into local channels more so 
that the people at home and the local 
retailers will know more about radio 
also. 

John G. Ballard 

Nat'l Sales. Advertising Dir. 

Nunn Stations 

Lexington, Ky. 



DISK JOCKEY FILMS 

I am very glad that Mr. A. E. Bey- 
nolds. vice-president in charge of sales 
for the Barbasol Company, asked, "Is 
there any TV program form that can 
fill the place of radio's disc jockey?", 
in the 6 June issue of sponsor, as it 
gives me a chance to publicly answer 
my friend Martin Block, whose opin- 
ions. I am sorry to see, have not 
changed since the morning last March 
when we discussed this very same 
problem in the conference room at 
WNEW (New York). 

It's quite true that music alone on 
the video screen is pretty deadly — 
just as deadly as the "Soundie" type 
of film which Mr. Block describes. 
which would simply show the mu- 
sicians at work, doing their "job." 
Such a sight would not add to the 
music — it would detract. To quote 
Mr. Block verbatim. "On television a 
music show needs more than music. 
It needs action. How can a disc 
jockey supply visual action on TV? 
What will he do?" 

Here is the answer. He can aug- 
ment the music by supplementing the 
viewers' imagination with dramatized 
motion pictures, in pantomime, of the 
story of each song, synchronized in 
timing to the individual recording of 
the selection. These motion pictures 
would be made available to TV stations 
on a rental basis, similar to present- 
day radio library transcriptions. They 
should be financed by the record com- 
panies themselves, due to the varying 
tempos and playing times of different 
recordings of the same selection. It 
would be a sales promotion for them 
that would soon pay off and become 
a profitable business in itself. 

Also, record companies might soon 
{Please turn to page 17) 



SPONSOR 




RADIOTIME, INC 

53 WEST JACKSON BLVD. 

CHICAGO 4, ILLINOIS 



4 JULY 1949 



KFH IS TORS 



KFH IS TOPS IN LOCALLY PRODUCED PROGRAMS. Over $50,000 
was spent for this purpose last year and the listening habits of the 
KFH area have been materially influenced by the uniform excellence 
of the broadcasts. For example, the sports programs scheduled for 
this fall include play by play broadcasts of 10 games voted most 
desirable in the KFH area. A KFH crew of 4 will travel 5500 miles 
through six states to bring out-of-town games to KFH and KFH-FM 
listeners. This is only one of the enterprises that make a station great. 

All sports events of listener interest are adequately covered by sports 
editor Larry Stanley and chief announcer, Dave Wilson. These men 
have a long record of popularity on KFH and KFH-FM; their follow- 
ing is tremendous and their record of achievement for commercial 
sponsors is an enviable one. Ask any Petry man for evidence. 








'W^* """Vrt,. 9-"" 

B r^r«-«»'* GW tj -masses 






-275* 

^ Football Broadcast ■ 





KFH went direct to the listeners to 
find out which games they wanted. 



5000 Watts -ALL the time 



KFH FOOTBALL 

SCHEDULE FOR 1949 

Scpf. 24 — Kansas University vs. 

Colorado University at Boulder, Colo. 
Oct. 1 — Wichita University vs. 

Houston University at Houston, Texas 
Oct. 8 — Bradley University vs. 

Wichita University at Wichita, Kans. 
Oct. 15 — Kansas University vs. 

Oklahoma University at Norman, Okla. 
Oct. 22 — Kansas University vs. 

Oklahoma A&M Univ. at Stillwater, Okla. 
Oct. 29 — Kansas State College vs. 

Kansas University at Lawrence, Kan. 
Nov. 5 — Kansas University vs. 

Nebraska University at Lincoln, Neb. 
Nov. 12 — Oklahoma University vs. 

Missouri University at Columbia, Mo. 
Nov. 19 — Missouri University vs. 

Kansas University at Lawrence, Kans. 
'Nov. 24 — Detroit University vs. 

Wichita University at Wichita, Kans. 
'Thanksgiving Day 



mill 



REPBESCNTID NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY a CO., INC. 



WICHITA, KANSAS 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 104') 




New and rvnew 






New on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Bruner-Rltter Inc 


Raymond Spector 


ABC 


General Foods Corp 


Benton & Bowles 


MBS 


Gillette Safety Razor Co 


Maxon 


MBS 


International Harvester Co 


McCann-Erickson 


NBC 


Kraft Foods Co 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC 


Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 


Newell-Emmett 


NBC 


Miles Laboratories Inc 


Wade 


NBC 


Philip Morris & Co Ltd 


Biow 


CBS 


Procter & Gamble Co 


Benton & Bowles 


CBS 


Quaker Oats Co 


Sherman & Marquette 


MBS 


Serutan Co 


Roy S. Durstine 


ABC 


Standard Oil Co of Calif 


BBD&O 


NBC 


Sterling Drug Co 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


ABC 


Wildroot Co 


BBD&O 


NBC 



187 Sun 9:30-10 pm; Sep 4; 52 wks 

221 Juvenile Jury; Sun 3:30-4 pm; Oct 2; 13 wks 

517 All Star Baseball Games; Tu July 12; 1:15 to conclusion 

16") Harvest of Stars; Sun 5:30-6 pm; Jun 28; 52 wks 

164 MTWTF 10:30-10:45 am; Oct 3; 52 wks 

163 Chesterfield Supper Club; Th 10-10:30 pm; Sep 8; 52 wks 
160 Quiz Kids; Sun 3:30-4 pm; Sep 11; 52 wks 

171 Horace Heidt; Sun 9:30-10 pm; Sep 4; 52 wks 

169 Red Skclton; Sun 8:30-9 pm; Oct 2; 52 wks 

Man On the Farm; Sat 12-12:30 pm; Aug 27; 39 wks 
57 Victor Lindlahr; MWF 10:45-11 pm; Sep 5; 52 wks 

Standard School Broadcasts; Fri 10-10:30 pm pat; Sep 
21 30; 26 wks 

204 My True Story; TuTh 10-10:25 am; Jun 7; 57 wks 

164 Adventures of Sam Spade; Sun 8-8:30 pm; Sep 25; 

52 wks 



QS Renewals on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 


NET 


STATIONS 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


CBS 


166 1 


Ward Wheelock 


NBC 
CBS 
CBC 


131 1 
155 5 ( 
154 


Ted Bates 

Sherman & Marquette 


CBS 
CBS 


152 ^32< 
151 


Grant 


MBS 


471 ~1 


H. B. Humphrey 


MBS 


63 1 


Zimmer-Keller 


ABC 


97 


Benton & Bowles 


NBC 
NBC 


147 

145 1 


J. Walter Thompson 


NBC 


148 1 


Grant 


NBC 


145 < 


Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell 
& Bayles 


MBS 


220 < 


Biow 


NBC 


151 ] 


Compton 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 

Pedlar & Ryan 


CBS 
NBC 
NBC 
CBS 
NBC 
NBC 
CBS 
CBS 
NBC 


149 1 
154 1 
152 1 

83 1 

154 1 
148 "■' 1 

83 ~^ 1 
84 

155 1 


Sherman & Marquette 


MBS 


501 1 


Gardner 


MBS 


362 1 


William Esty 


NBC 


162 J 


Cecil & Presbrey 


MBS 


465 2 


Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell 
& Bayles 


NBC 


53 1 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



II 



Borden Co 
Campbell Soup Co 

Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

Cudahy Packing Co 

First Church of Christ Scientist 

Fruehauf Trailer Co 
General Foods Corp 

Kraft Foods Co 

Mars Inc 

Noxzema Chemical Co 

Procter & Gamble Co 



Quaker Oats Co 

Ralston Purina Co 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 

Ronson Art Metal Works Inc 

Whitehall Pharmacal Co 



County Fair; Sat 2-2:30 pm; Jul 9; 52 wks 

Double or Nothing; MTWTF 2-2:30 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 

Club 15; MTWTF 7:30-7:45 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 

Edward R. Murrow ; MTWTF 7:45-8 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 

Our Miss Brooks; Sun 9:30-10 pm; Jul 3; 52 wks 

Mr. & Mrs. North; Tu 8:30-9 pm; Jul 5; 52 wks 

Nick Carter; Sun 6:30-7 pm; Sep 11; 52 wks 

Healing Ministry of Christian Science; Sat 4:45-5 pm; 

Jul 2; 13 wks 
This Changing World; Su 3-3:15 pm; Jun 19; 52 wks 
Aldrich Family Th 8-8:30 pm; Jun 30; 52 wks 
Burns & Allen; Th 8:30-9 pm; Jun 30; 52 wks 
Kraft Music Hall; Th 9-9:30 pm; Jul 21; 11 wks 
Curtain Time; Wed 10:30-11 pm; Jul 6; 52 wks 
Gabriel Heattcr; Mon 7:30-7:45 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 

Life Can Be Beautiful; MTWTF 3-3:15 pm; Jun 27; 

53 wks 
FBI In Peace & War; Th 8-8:30 pm; Jul 7; 52 wks 
Road of Life; MTWTF 10:30-10:45 am; Jun 27; 53 wks 
Right to Happiness; MTWTF 3:45-4 pm; Jun 27; 53 wks 
Lowell Thomas; MTWTF 6.45-7 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 
Brighter Dav; MTWTF 10:45-11 am; Jun 27; 53 wks 
Ma Perkins; MTWTF 3:15-3:30 pm; Jun 27; 53 wks 
Beulah; MTWTF 7-7:15 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 
Jack Smith; MTWTF 7:15-7:30 pm; Jun 27; 52 wks 
Pepper Young; MTWTF 3:30-3:45 pm; Jun 27; 53 wks 
Roy Rogers; Sun 6-6:30 pm; Jul 3; 52 wks 
Tom Mix; MWF 5:30-6 pm; Sep 26; 39 wks 
Jimmy Durante; Fri 9:30-10 pm; Oct 7; 26 wks 
20 Questions; Sat 8-8:30 pm; Jul 2; 52 wks 
Hollywood Star Theatre; Sat 8-8:30 pm; Jul 2; 52 wks 



1 



11 

m. 



National Broadcast Sales Executives (Personnel changes) 



II 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



George Arkedis 
Murray C. Evans 
Robert F. Laws 



CBS-TV, N. Y., acct exec 

WHLI, N. Y., acct exec 

KGO, S. F., sis prom, adv, publ dir 



Same, Western sis mgr 

WGBB, Freeport N. Y., sis mgr 

ABC, Western div, sis mgr 



• in next issue: Xeir Aationeil Selective Business. \eiv and Renewed on TV 
Advertising Ageneg Personnel Chunges. Station Representative Changes 



mm 

,: 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John K. Barry 
Harry W. Bennett Jr 
Russell Brown 
T. F. Delafield 
H. A. Goodwin 
George R. Frederick 
E. W. Gutelius 

John L. II. .11. ii 

Virginia MacAuley 
Kdmund F. Ortmeyer 
H. M. Kobinson 

Val A. Schmitz 
Edward Sicgelson 
Albert W. Smith 

James C. Swan 
George F. Swartz 
Richard Weil Jr 



Arnold Schwinn & Co, Chi., adv mgr 

Honel Corp, Bronxville N. Y., adv, sis prom dir 

General Mills Inc. Mnpls. 

Delta Air Lines, Atlanta Ga., passenger sis mgr 

Falstaff Brewing Corp, St. L., gen sis mgr 

Loft Candy Corp, N. Y., exec vp 

General Electric Co, N. Y., asst sis prom mgr 
lamp dept 

Kaiser-Frazer Corp, Willow Run Mich., chief 
engineer, works mgr 



Armour & Co, Chi., asst adv mgr packinghouse 
prods 

White Rock Corp, N. Y., adv, sis prom mgr 

A. Holthausen, Union City N. J., sis prom mgr 

Central Arizona Light & Power Co, Phoenix, 
residential, small comml sis section mgr 

Hiram Walker Inc, Detroit, adv mgr 

Textron Inc, N. Y., sis prom mgr 

R. H. Macy & Co, N. Y„ vp 



Wilson Brothers, Chi., adv mgr 
John F. Jeike Co, Chi., adv mgr 
Dad's Root Beer Co, Chi., adv, mdsg mgr 
Same, gen sis mgr 
Same, vp in chge sis 
Same, pres 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc, N. Y., adv, sis prom dir 
lamp, fixture div 

Same, gen mgr 

I. B. Kleinert Rubber Co, N. Y., adv mgr 
F. W. Cook Co Inc, Evansville Ind.. exec vp 
Same, adv mgr soap, industrial prods 

Blatz Brewing Co, Milw., adv dir 

Diana Stores Corp, N. Y-, adv, sis prom mgr 

Same, sis prom, adv mgr 

White Rock Corp, N. Y., adv, sis prom dir 

Same, adv mgr 

Macy's New York, N. Y., pres 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Albert's Products Co, Portland Ore.. 

Anti Decay Drug Corp, N. Y 

K. Arakelian Inc, Madera Calif 

Automatic Radio Mfg Co, Boston... 

B. T. Babbitt Inc, N. Y 

H. C. Brill Co Inc, Newark N. J 

Bruner-Ritter Inc, N. Y 

Buckeye Brewing Co, Toledo O 



Portland Punch 

. DK Ammoniated toothpaste .... 

. Mksion Bell Wine 

.Tom Thumb portables, TV sets 
. Swerl Suds 

Brill's Spanish Rice 

. Bretton watch attachments 

.Beer 



Clinton Home Improvements Inc, East Orange N. J. 

Coro Inc, N. Y 

R. B. Davis Co, Hoboken N. J 



Edelstein Foods Inc, N. Y 

Federal Television Corp, N. Y 

Fenway Wine & Liquor Co, Boston 

Geigy Co Inc, N. Y 

Grove Laboratories, St. L 

Headquarters Fifth Army, Chi 

Morris Hessel Inc, N. Y 

Ice Cream Novelties, N. Y 

Linen Mart, Wilmington Del 

Mitchell Manufacturing Co, Chi 

Mother's Food Products Inc, Newark N. J... 

Nestle Form Co, Balto 

Nineteen Hundred Corp, St. Joseph Mich.... 
Occidental Life Insurance Co, Raleigh N. C. 

Ohrbach's Stores, N. Y 

Park View Inc, Phila 

Pictsweet Foods Inc, S. F 

Pure-Pak Council, Detroit 

Regal Amber Brewing Co, S. F 

Robin Airways Inc, L. A 

A. Santaella & Co, Tampa Fla 

Santa Fe Vintage Co, L. A 

Scatena York Co, S. F 

William S. Scull Co, Camden N. J 

Selco Coffee, Phila 

Sylvania Electric Products, N. Y 

Veronica Oil Co, S. F 

A. A. Walter & Co, Inc, Albany N. V. 

Waltham Watch Co, Waltham Mass 

Whitehall Pharmacal Co, N. Y 



Building materials 

Costume jewelry 

. ''icomn't 

Davis baking powder, S-.el, new 

chocolate frosting and fudge prod.... 

. Foods 

TV equipment 

. Wine, liquor 

.Pharmaceutical prods 

. Fitch toiletries 

. Recruiting (13 Midwestern states) 

. Furrier 

. Ice cream novelties 

. Linens 

. Room air-conditioner 

. Foods 

. Brassieres 

. Home laundry equipment 

. Insurance 

.Department stores 

. Collingswood N. J. apartment center... 

. Frozen, canned foods 

.Milk containers 

.Beer 

. Air travel 

.Optimo cigars 

. Santa Fe Wines 

York refrigerator equipment distributor. 
. . Boscul coffee, tea 

.Coffee r 

. .TV sets 

. Peanut oil 

. . Blue Ribbon Potato Chips 

. . Watches 



. H. C. Morris, H'wood. 

Dunay & Rader, N. Y. 
.Young & Rubicam, S. F. 

Hare, Boston 
. Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y. 

Tracy, Kent, N. Y. 

Raymond Spcctor, N. Y. 

. Livingstone-Porter-Hicks, 
Detroit 

Mike Goldgar, Boston 

.Hirshon-Garfield, N. Y. 

Brisacher, Wheeler, N. Y. 

. Duane Jones, N. Y. 

. Friedlander & Meyer, N. Y. 

.Lancaster, N. Y. 

Mike Goldgar, Boston 

L. W. Frolich, N. Y. 

Harry 15. Cohen, N. Y. 

John W. Shaw, Chi. 

Marcel Schulhoff, N. Y. 

Monroe Greenthal, N. Y. 
.Weightman, Phila. 
.Jones Frankel, Chi. 
.Ray-Hirsch, N. Y. 
.Robinson, Balto. 
.Beaumont & Hohman, Chi. 
.Piedmont, Salisbury N. C. 
.Doyle Dane Bernbach, N. Y. 

Clements, Phila. 
.Brisacher, Wheeler, S. F. 

Fred. M. Randall, Detroit 

Abbott Kimhall, S. F. 
.Dan B. Miner, L. A. 

.Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford, N. Y. 
. Lockwood-Shackelford, L. A. 
.Hoefer, Dieterich & Brown, S. F. 
.Louis & Gilman, Phila. 
. Yardis, Phila. 
.Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y. 
.Small & Gautreaux, Oakland Calif. 
..Norman D. Waters, N. Y. 
..Daniel F. Sullivan, Boston 



. Kolynos tooth paste, anti-decay 
tooth powder 



Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, N. Y. 




DOES YOUR PICTURE 

BELONG IN THIS FRAME? 

It does ... if you're one of the "little men who isn't there" with straight thinking about 
summer business in the Duluth-Superior Market. 

Strange to say in this enlightened age of time buying on facts, there still are advertisers 
who believe business falls off in summer. Why they do, we can't understand. Because 
fact it is, that business actually is better in summer in this market. 

That's not difficult to understand when you realize that hundreds of thousands of free- 
spending tourists vacation in this area. Your advertising dollar can produce a bonus 
return for you if you reach this market while it's loaded with extra cash. 

Why not start your planned fall campaign early in this market to take advantage of this 
bonus business? 



WEBC * DULUTH-SUPERIOR * KDAL 



NBC 



MINNESOTA 



WISCONSIN 



CBS 



4 JULY 1949 



II 



Forecasts oj tilings to come as 
seen by sponsor's editors 



Outlook 



Real estate down 20-25%; 
only small homes selling 

Private real estate has taken a had beating in past six 
months. Homes in the over-$20,000 class have dropped 
from 20 to 25 % of the asking price since 1 January 1949. 
Federal Reserve Board indicates there is still a great de- 
mand for homes, but in the under-$10,000 class. Builders 
agree but complain that buyers want house, lot, completely- 
equipped kitchen, and then some, at this price. FRB re- 
ports 3,000,000 prospective home-buyers. Most of them 
want ranch-type homes, with Bendix washers and tele- 
vision sets installed. 

Sports appeal for women increased 
via television presentations 

Box-office appeal of all sports is rapidly taking on a skirted 
slant. That's because women, as well as men, are TV 
viewers and are frequently forced to look at sports if they 
initially want to or not, and thus are won over to action 
events. Many a housewife with a television set can tell 
her husband more about baseball than he ever knew, and 
they're specialists also on the groan-and-grunt sport. 
Maison Blanche (New Orleans) tested a $1 vegetable 
grater on a TV sports program and did better than most 
other advertisers did with it on a straight women's 
scanning. They'll be putting skirts on ushers soon. 

CPI needs revision; 
Congress asked for $ $ $ 

Although the Consumers' Price Index is an accurate gauge 
of what it reports, the changed buying habits of the Ameri- 
can public make it a less-than-accurate picture of what it 
costs the average family to live. Even the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics admits that what a family bought in 
1935-39 is no true index to what it's buying today, and 
that therefore its CPI is an outdated trend line. BLS is 
asking Congress for money to set up a new standard of 
"living requirements," and expects to get it. Future CPI 
will be tuned to today's living — when the money is appro- 
priated. 

More products being advertised; 
newspaper and radio use up 

Number of items being advertised is 10/{ above 1948. 
Magazine linage is down, newspapers and radio up. Most 
attention is being given to jewelry, cameras, gasoline, 
automobiles, travel, and resorts. Advertising stress will 
continue to increase until December, with trend beyond 
that bevond forecasting. 



Men's summer clothing staying 
on racks at retailers 

Lack of planning in the men's summer-clothing field has 
caught both retailers and manufacturers with their in- 
ventories up when they should be down. Advertising has 
been notable by its absence. Prices have been out of line 
with current market. Most of all. there's been no con- 
certed industry-wide thinking or promotion. Fact that 
heavy clothing worn in the summer not only is uncomfort- 
able but actually detrimental to the clothing, and fact that 
summer clothing costs a fraction of the equivalent year- 
round clothing haven't been promoted. If it hadn't been 
for an unusually humid June, the mens clothing industry 
wouldn't have been really crying the blues. 

Railroads trying the 
"fair" routine 

Chicago has started the fairs going again with a giant 
Chicago Railroad Fair that's costing participating rail- 
roads over $3,000,000. Neither the press nor radio has 
given the Fair much attention, for the advertising budget 
is nothing to talk about, and the media look upon it as 
a commercial enterprise. None other than former NBC 
president Lenox Lohr heads up the enterprise which will 
keep going, it hopes, until 2 October. The Fair is said to 
have "everything" from an hour documentary pageant to a 
wild-west show, but it's questionable as to whether or not 
it will sell travel by rails as glamorous. There's not a 
plane in an acre. 

More women than men 
is 1940-1948 trend 

Latest figures released by Census Bureau show that the 
sex ratio in the past ten years has changed from an ex- 
cess of males in 1940 of 500,000 to a deficit of males in 
1948 of 500,000. The 1948 figure is an estimate, for no 
official census will be taken until 1950. Bureau officials 
refuse to indicate if the million shift indicates a trend, 
or whether the war is responsible. 

U. S. Savings Bond push 
a great big ache 

Push on U. S. Savings Bonds is disturbing short-range 
thinkers in Washington. Idea is that any stress on savings 
at this time merely serves to curtail further consumer buy- 
ing — buying that is urgently needed now. Short-range 
thinking is based upon need to do something now. and 
they say now is not the time for mass saving. It can 
only build a greater recession. Radio can help by not push- 
ing bonds, despite Treasury Department urging. 

Door-bell ringing ahead 

for department-store salesmen 

Department stores, which haven't indulged in door-to-door 
selling, will start changing their minds about it this fall. 
Merchandise men at a number of stores in markets which 
can absorb more appliances and home furnishings are 
going to send out crews of bell-ringers. This is a new- 
field for this type of retailer, but department stores aren't 
going to stumble over tradition. The) plan to back up 
the salesmen with a door-opening radio broadcast cam- 
paign. That's also new for the stores. 



12 



SPONSOR 



Illl IT DOES MIR SALES OUTLOOK 



CALL FOR TODAY ? ? 5 



£7 



^ 



^ 



establishing a new product in grocer stores of 
Chicago and territory? 

(See what Martha and Helen and WLS have 
done for Rap-in-Wax!) 

stepping up sales of your already-established 
grocery store items in wide Chicagoland ? 

(Ask the makers of "Old Dutch Cleanser" 
or Chase and Sanborn coffee about "Martha 
and Helen" on WLS!) 

getting regular reports on just how your prod- 
uct is doing in retail grocery outlets of Chicago 
and territory? 

(The makers of Creamettes and many other 
grocery-store-sold items will tell you about 
Martha and Helen's report service!) 



Martha Crane and Helen Joyce with their WLS Fea- 
ture Foods program combine (l) powerful radio 
selling to a loyal, responsive audience of housewives 
who spend money in grocery stores, (2) an in- 
grocery-store merchandising and reporting service 
available only to Martha and Helen's sponsors. 



For availabilities and other facts about this outstand- 
ing way to move merchandise into and out of grocery 
stores in Chicago and territory — and how you can 
participate — call or wire Sales Manager, WLS, Chi- 
cago 7, Illinois today! 



^&<S^£z^<^^^ 




~890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY. 
4 JULY 1949 



13 



for profitable 
selling - 

INVESTIGATE 



VW*> 



\N 



\\> 



0&- 






>st 



t^H' 



Represented by 




ROBERT 



MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

New York • Chicago 

San Francisco • Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




Mr. Sponsor 



1 liar I <>s H. Percy 



President 
Bell & Howell Co., Chicago 



With Ted Briskin's Revere Camera Co. advertising like mad to win 
the hearts and dollars of amateur and semi-pro movie-making hobby- 
ists, conservative, old-line Bell & Howell has had to soup up the tradi- 
tional stately pace of its advertising and selling. Despite the slogan 
"Since 1907 the Largest Manufacturer of Professional Motion Picture 
Equipment for Hollywood and the World," B & H supplies probably 
no more than 5% of Hollywood's professional movie-making equip- 
ment. It's the nearly 300.000 amateurs who use B & H cameras and 
associated equipment who accounted last year for the major share of 
sales totalling more than seventeen-and-a-half-million dollars. But the 
competitive cloud on the horizon was already more than the size 
of a man's hand when Charles Percy took over last January as 
president. The "stately pace'' gave way instantly to a fast gait. 

Percy started working summers for the firm in 1938 while 
attending the University of Chicago. President McNabb (who died 
early last January) sized him up as a young man keen on finding 
better ways to do a job, made him an officer of the company at the 
age of 22. upon his graduation from the university. While stationed 
on the West Coast, Percy spent his spare time studying industrial 
organization and strike causes. He believes men should understand 
not only what they are doing but why they are doing it. It's reported 
that, back in Chicago, in charge of industrial relations, he asked some 
workmen what they were doing with lumber they were moving. When 
the workmen said they didn't know. Percy bawled out a v.p. 

He's a bug on using films for education, and is probably more 
responsible than any other one man for the way companies like 
Ford, Chevrolet, Singer, Simmons, and Westinghouse are using films 
to sell their products through sales films . . . and on television. 

Percy isn't content to "cultivate" the present class market of 
hobbyists, he's out to widen it. Major moves to do it consist of the 
video Action Autographs, five-minute films showing famous people 
using B & H equipment; e. t. Hollywood Heritage spots and breaks 
provided free to dealers who buy radio time (campaigns are going 
now in four major markets). Legal understanding is part of running 
a business, so Percy studied law at night school — as part of his 
job of keeping B & H growing. 



14 



SPONSOR 




TELEVISION GOES BERSER^ 





Directed and Staged by 

Ezra Stone 

A Kudner Agency, Inc. TV Production 



every 





■ mi 



Coast to Coast 

Beginning June 28th over NBC-TV 

and July 12th on 



Network 
non-netivork stations 
presented by your BUICK dealer 



4 JULY 1949 



15 



Remember the 
story about . . . 



the old general store 




that grew into today's 




department store? 

Such development is much 
like that of WWDC in Wash- 
ington. WWDC has come to 
be a huge power for pro- 
ducing low-cost sales in the 
rich market of the Nation's 
Capital. And incidentally, 
big retailers are among our 
most successful advertisers. 
Check into this with your 
Forjoe man. 



WWDC 

AM-FM— The D. C. Independent 

Represented Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



New developments on SPONSOR stories 



p.s. 



See: "Letters Tell A Story" 

IsSUe: 14 March 1949, p. 25 

Subject: Audience mail up; best pullers are 
shows with specific appeals 



The upward trend in radio audience mail throughout the country 
reported last March has continued. This is partly due to new radio 
and TV shows that stimulate letter-writing. By the end of June the 
flow of letters will have hit the bottom of the seasonal mail slump. 
It starts about 15 April as if at some invisible signal, hits low ebb 
toward the end of June, and doesn't start to climb again until the 
end of July. Vacations, plus hot weather in many areas, discourage 
people from putting gripes, praises, or requests on paper. Events 
that solidly grip the imagination of people in any area tend to curb 
letter-writing. The national election in November caused a sharp 
dip in the normal audience mail curve for that month. The pick-up 
that normally starts in August continues slowly until about two 
weeks past Labor Day. when it begins a fast climb. October and 
November are just short of the peak months of January and Feb- 
ruary. The pre-Christmas slump begins the second week in Decem- 
ber, and mail continues slow until 10 January. This is the general 
pattern of letter-writing to national network programs as reported 
b\ Rernard O'Donnell's Radioland Mail Service I Long Island. 
N. Y. ) . and it holds roughly true for most areas of the country. 

Not all radio and television programs are letter-stimulators; but 
many are built around a gimmick that requires communication of 
some kind with the program. Kid shows on video are strong on 
this, and it's amazing what the moppets will do between programs 
to share in the fun. In the last year, for example, 75.000 youngsters 
drew and submitted cartoons of figures appearing in ABC's Cartoon 
Teletales. Simple drawing instruction is part of the show. 

Where individual stations are concerned, live shows produce the 
most mail, and by and large, hillbilly programs are the champion 
pullers on stations that cater to rural audiences. As general manag- 
er Ben Ludy of WIBW. Topeka, points out. there are exceptions. 
On WIBW. for example, the transcribed Judy and Jane is a top mail- 
getter. Quiz shows are special examples of the rule that the way to 
eret mail is to make people want to write — then ask them to write. 
Their reason for writing may be anything from a sponsor's product 
for which they will enclose cash, to the mere satisfaction of com- 
mvnicating with a radio "personage." 



p.s 



See: "Blackstone's 50-50 Deal" 

IsSUe: 14 February 1949 

Subject: Why Blackstone Corporation suspended 
cooperative advertising 



A strike at Blackstone's Jamestown. N. Y.. plant early in March 
quickly left the company's approximately 50 distributors without 
washing machines. Dealers and distributors felt they couldn't stay 
on the air indefinitely at their own expense without machines to 
sell. Blackstone advised them all to cancel Blackstone, Magic 
Detective, their transcribed radio program, at the end of its current 
13-week cycle. For fear of prejudicing listeners with news of the 
strike, each show left the air without announcement of any kind. 
On 25 May the strike was settled, and assembly lines are rolling 
again. Ad-manager James E. Peters is notifying distributors directly 
when to expect deliveries, and these dates will determine start of 
individual campaigns. Not all Blackstone distributors retained their 
(Please turn to page 38) 



16 



SPONSOR 



40 West J 2nd 



(Continued from page 6) 

find themselves the proud possessors 
of a new method for building songs up 
into the hit class. Recordings that 
could never quite make a hit on their 
musical merit might be pushed into the 
hit class on the strength of their ac- 
companying motion pictures, and rec- 
ord companies would be vying with 
one another to outdo each other on 
film production, needless to say, a very 
healthy situation for video. 

Film production companies such as 
Cinemart, Inc., would be glad to lend 
their know-how and experience to the 
production of such films for the record 
companies. 

I have discussed this idea with sev- 
eral recording executives, all of whom 
like it. However, I wonder how TV 
program directors feel about it. I'd 
like to receive some opinions from 
them. 

Paul V. E. Perez 
Director of TV Sales 
Cinemart, Inc. 
New York 



GARDEN PROGRAMS 

Last year the American Nurseryman 
ran a story on garden radio programs 
using, for the most part, excerpts from 
sponsor's original story on the subject. 
From personal experience with gar- 
den radio shows, I considered your 
article to be the most intelligent 
analysis which I have ever read on 
the subject. I am one of the few 
persons who still believe that an enter- 
taining garden show can be created to 
sell merchandise. Your story was an 
inspiration. 

D. Murray Franklin 

President 

National Garden Supply 

Merchandiser, Baltimore 



FM A GOOD "BUY" 

I have read with considerable inter- 
est your article. Radio Is Getting 
Bigger, in the 23 May issue of 
SPONSOR. 

With no wish to distract from the 
growing importance of TV, I do want 
to say that I feel you are doing the 
sound-broadcasting industry a great 
service in bringing the AM. FM, TV 
I Please turn to page 35) 




Example 

# 15 



15 years ago Tappins Stores, re- 
tailers in Jewelry and Optical 
Goods in the Philadelphia area, 
started buying time on WIP. 
They have been with us — 52 
weeks a year — without interrup- 
tion ever since. And they have 
just renewed for another vear. 



WIP 

Philadelphia 
Basic Mutual 



Represented Nationally 



i:i»\V \ltl» PETKY & CO 




4 JULY 1949 



17 



WREN 



\ m Topeka, Kansas 

W ABC affiliate 

covering half a million radio 
families in a 2 billion dollar 
retail market 



\ 




announces the appointment effective 
July 1, 1949 of . . . 



Weed 

and company 

radio and television 

station representatives 





new york 

boston 

Chicago 

detroit 

san francisco 

atlanta 

hollywood 



18 



SPONSOR 






gpP^ 




XS 



&• 



HUNDREDS OF FANS ATTEND BASEBALL GAMES WITH PORTABLES TO MAKE SURE THEY DON'T MISS FAVORITE SPORTCASTERS 



The big pins 

Amazing facts about 
ff outside-the-hoine 99 listening 



Broadcast advertising is be- 
ing shortchanged by all 
ratings: Hooper, Nielsen. Pulse, Ra- 
dox, or any other home-based rating 
system. All will be ready to admit that 
their ratings do not take into account 
out-of-the-home listening. 

It's not possible to ignore listening 
away from the fireside, if a sponsor 
wants to obtain an accurate guide to 
what he's buying. At-work radio listen- 
ing is amazing. It frequently amounts 
to more hours per day than the at-work 



S'i 



please turn page 




outdoor 



listening increases every year and while it 
a humid-wealher habit. Millions of portabl 



listener enjoys at home. The use of 
automotive radio per-person does not 
hulk as high in hours as home receiv- 
ers but auto sets-in-use figures for cer- 
tain hours of the day are far higher 
than home radio. As the summer ap- 
proaches and city home radio usage 
is said to decline, car radio usage goes 
up. up. and up. 

Sets in public places I restaurants, 
bars, clubs, groceries, dairies, shoe- 
makers, automatic laundries, beautv 
and barber shops I are in use many 
hours longer than sets at home. In- 
dividually they reach many more peo- 
ple than a home set. while at the same 
time reaching a few people I storekeep- 
ers and employees) far more hours 
than a home radio. 

These are all permanent installa- 
tions. Listening in each case can be 
measured — and in a few areas, like 
New York. Baltimore. Washington, and 
Boston, is being measured spasmodical- 
ly now. It's costly to measure listen- 
ing out-of-the-home. Thus it hasn't 
been done on a continuing basis. 
Nevertheless, it's important both quan- 
titively and qualitatively The total 
out-of-the-home listening at certain 
hours of the day may be actually more 
than all listening at home. It's being 
measured for TV in many cases be- 
cause viewing at bars and during 
the early days of telecasting in am 
city exceeds viewing in homes. For 
sports events, the number of viewers 
always may run so high at eating and 
drinking places as to be a great factor 
in a sponsor's consideration when buy- 
ing a fight, race, football, or baseball 



hits annual high in summertime, it's not just 
e radios are being used throughout the year 

game. Listening to these events in 
public places has been almost com- 
pletely ignored — except in an occasion- 
al sales presentation made by a station 
or network sales executive. No matter 
how great the viewing in a radio-TV 
town, listening still exceeds viewing 
even in public places on a morning-to- 
midnight basis. 

Stations like WNEW are currently 
measuring out-of-the-home listening. 
For years this station has sold its bar. 
grill, and lunchroom audience on an 
after-midnight basis. It seldom stopped 
to think that the self-same spots lis- 



tened to WNEW all-day long. The 
spots do not turn on their sets when 
the clock strikes 12. What's true for 
this music-and-news station is also 
true for practically all leading music- 



and-news stations like WHHM l Mem- 
phis. WHDH (Boston). WCKY (Cin- 
cinnati l. WITH (Baltimore), and lit- 
eral!) hundreds of other stations 
throughout the U. S. and Canada. 

When the network stations have a 
big sporting event exclusively, then 
public-place listening may shift to these 
outlets. For day-in and day-out listen- 
ing, eating and service establishments 
stick to non-talk stations. There is an 
exception to this in foreign-language 
areas. Stores in Italian sections of 
New York, for instance, have been 
checked and found in the daytime to 
be heavily pro-WOV. The Yorkville 
section (German) tunes WBNX and 
WWRL. The foreign-language audi- 
ence is faithful to the stations that 
speak their language and that goes for 
public places as well as home listening. 

From coast-to-coast, neighborhood 
retailers enjoy and use radio receivers 
in their stores. The big "downtown" 
stores do not have radios but their 
impact on the population of any town 
is a fraction of that of the neighbor- 
hood merchant, the man with his radio 
turned on. 

A recent "living-habits" survey indi- 
cated that the average housewife visits 
at least one neighborhood store per 
day and stays in that store at least 
15 minutes. The average time per- 
customer per-store in this report was 
indicated as 28 minutes. It's some- 
what less in chain stores and super 
markets, where clerk-customer conver- 
sation is at a minimum, but even then 
it's checked at 20 minutes. There's 
less chance of there being a radio play- 
ing in giant markets, but this is rap- 
idly being corrected through store- 



factory 



dialing is pro-music and news. The great majority of factories in the U. S. today permit 
workers to have radio entei lainment while they work. Radio helps produce better workers 




casting installations which combine 
radio and point-of-sale selling. 

The yen for music-while-you-ride is 
pretty universal. The "silent car" is 
the exception on the road. Turning on 
the radio is a protection from back- 
seat driving, as well as a relaxation. A 
great segment of the male population 
drives to work. Because key advertis- 
ing agencies and home offices of manu- 
facturers are located in big cities, exec- 
utives are apt to forget this twice-daily 
mass-migration on wheels. The aver- 
age time taken in driving to work is 
40 minutes. Driving-home runs nearer 
50 minutes, due to errands, etc., which 
are part of the daily grind. 

Since the after-dark use of cars 
varies with each family, it's difficult 
to arrive at any conclusive figure as 
to the number of hours per night that 
an auto radio is in use. 

In May 1940, Station WOR com- 
missioned Pulse of New York to deter- 
mine the percentage of automobiles in 
metropolitan New York that were 
radio-equipped. Pulse's figure, as of 
May 1949, was 72.8%. Estimates of 
automobiles-with-radio nationally runs 
from New York's 72.8% downward to 
63%. In Greater New York (16 coun- 
ties), there are 2,093,000 autos. This 
means there are 1,523,802 radio- 
equipped cars in Metropolitan New 
York. 

Another Pulse-conducted survey, this 
time for WNEW, New York, indicated 
last April that 28.7% of New Yorkers 
enjoy broadcasting outside the home. 
Of this 28.7%, 39.8% enjoy it in a 
car. This means that 11.4% of New 
York listens while riding. That's an 
amazing audience — an audience that 




auto radios 



are almost as much a part 
is sometimes more than liste 



has never been included in any listen- 
ing index to date. 

Pulse's figure for at-work listening 
is 26.4% of those who listen away 
from from home, or 7.6% of New 
York. The at-work audience is diffi- 
cult to gauge. Nine years ago when 
Muzak was evaluating the possibilities 
of installing its music-while-you-work 
service in factories around New York, 
a special survey of 1,000 factories was 
conducted by sponsor's editor, then as- 
sistant to the general manager of the 
various Muzak services. The figures 
developed amazed him as they did the 
g.m. In the 1,000 factories, 684 per- 
mitted radio to be played during work- 
ing hours in the factory section of 
the plant. I Very few permitted radio 
in the offices ) . The average workers 



ilflohrnnm ra( ^io is as much part of operation as food and drink. From morn to night and some- 
UlIU II I UUIIi times round the clock, music and news can make many customers forget the food 




of automobile equipment as brakes. Listening on wheels 
ning at home. Auto radios are turned on every hour of day 

within ear reach of the set in use 
were 132. Thus in these 1,000 factories 
there was a radio audience of 89,288 
individuals. The average length of 
time during which the factory sets 
were in use was three-and-a-half hours 
per day. The programs tuned were for 
the most part music and news but in 
a number of factories where the work 
was 100% of a repetitive nature, and 
the workers mostly women, soap operas 
were permitted. In the factories where 
the employees were of U. S. origin, 
the music was popular through 
WNEW, WMCA, WINS, etc. In fac- 
tories where the workers were of Eur- 
opean origin, WQXR was an impor- 
tant listening factor. 

On baseball days, broadcasts of the 
most important game were permitted 
in a number of factories where the 
work wouldn't be slowed down by 
play-by-play airings. Where produc- 
tion would be lowered by play-by-play 
listening, managements frequently per- 
mitted sets to be tuned to stations that 
included scores in hourly newscasts. 

More and more factory work is of 
an assembly-line nature. Even in gar- 
ment factories, where years ago one 
workman would do everything on a 
garment, today each tailor or dress- 
maker does just a few operations and 
passes the garment on to the next 
worker. In the age of specialization, 
the specialist can listen and work — 
and does. 

Today is the era of the portable 
radio. At a baseball game anywhere in 
the nation, some fans come to enjoy 
I Please turn to page 47) 



mg *# $1*9 1 



WM 



Orange ikbe 



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G>, 



°*4 



n 



r °*en r 



PHP 



,ne in -This is Bing Crosby' 



fiKjS 



WHDHtC12noon 



POINT-OF-SALE POSTERS HAVE THE GROANER, HIS PROGRAM, AND LOCAL STATION, SELLING MINUTE MAID JUICE AND PRICE 

Squeezing the most out of Bing 

— personality 
Minute Maid moves ahead with dynamic — product 

— medium 



URSEIF 





The stockholders in Vacuum 
Foods Corporation last Octo- 
ber approved an increase in 
the authorized common stock issue of 
the company to 480,000 shares. This 
was done to provide for the sale of 
20,000 additional shares to Vacuum's 
parent company, Orange Concentrate 
Associates. Inc., to replace a similar 
number of shares which OCA had sold 
to a gentleman named Harry Lillis 
Crosby. Jr. It was at the same time 
that the same Mr. Crosby became a 
member of the board of directors of 
Vacuum Foods. 

Thus, in small, cold type, state the 
corporate records of Vacuum Foods, 
inasmuch as corporate records don t 
unbend enough to call a spade a spade, 
even though everyone in the United 
States and most of the rest of the 
civilized world knows that Harry Lillis 
Crosby. Jr., is, of course, The Groaner. 



_ Minute Maid's own deep 
' freeze sells orange juice 



Der Bingle, the No. 1 man in American 
entertainment — in a word, Bing. 

Bing Crosby's connection with Vac- 
uum Foods and its one and only 
product, Minute Maid, a quick-frozen 
orange- juice concentrate, has meant 
considerably more than the sale of 
a block of stock and a listing as a 
board director. Since last October 
Crosby has been the principal sales- 
man for a new product which in the 
three years of its existence has risen 
from an idea to a multi-million-dollar 
business. Bing's 15-minute Monday- 
through-Friday daytime program for 
Vacuum has been responsible to a 
large degree for the fast sales rise that 
has increased Minute Maid business 
more than six times over what it was 
in 1947. 

Vacuum Foods was organized origi- 
nally to produce an orange-juice pow- 
der, an idea which had been developed 



I 




BING CROSBY TOASTS WORKING EXECUTIVE, SALES, ADVERTISING STAFF OF MINUTE MAID FROM NEW FOUNTAIN DISPENSER 



after two years of research by the Na- 
tional Research Corporation of Boston. 
During the war, NRC scientists had ex- 
perimented with a high-vacuum pro- 
cess for reducing orange juice first to 
a type of sherbet concentrate, then to 
a pure orange-juice powder. In 1945. 
John M. Fox, now president of 
Vacuum Foods, then sales head of 
NRC, procured an Army contract for 
the powder; with this as a nucleus. 
Vacuum Foods Corporation was 
formed. 

After the war, the plans to manu- 
facture the orange-juice powder were 
dropped in favor of marketing the 
concentrate itself in frozen form. 
Vacuum started commercial produc- 
tion in April, 1946, manufacturing 
360,000 gallons of the frozen concen- 
trated juice during 1946-47. and 
1,300,000 gallons the following year. 
Vacuum expects to produce this year 



about 40,% of the total 8-9,000,000 
gallons that will be manufactured by 
the dozen or so frozen-juice companies 
in the field. 

Vacuum lost money during the first 
couple of years of its existence, but 
by the end of the third fiscal year 
(July. 1948), it had emerged into the 
black by a comfortable margin. The 
detailed three-year profit-and-loss fig- 
ures are as follows: 



Year 
1946 
1947 
1948 



Sales 
$ 374,501 
453,919 
2,972,267 



Net 



Deficit 

$ 79,173 

371,089 



$149,566 

The company has at present two 
plants in Florida, and later this year 
it will put into operation a third plant, 
located in California. This move will 
be tied in with the firm's plans for 
national distribution for the first time 
in its operation. 

Until H. L. Crosby, Jr., entered the 
Minute Maid picture as board director 



and radio salesman, Vacuum's use of 
broadcast advertising had consisted 
solely of a September, 1947, to March. 
1948. participation on the Galen Drake 
Starlight Salute program on WJZ, New 
York. Crop shortages resulted in a 
curtailment of Minute Maid advertis- 
ing over the summer of 1948 — until 
John Hay ( Jock ) Whitney, an impor- 
tant factor in the destinies of Vacuum 
Foods, introduced Bing Crosby to a 
drink of Minute Maid orange juice . . . 
Vacuum's advertising budget for 
1949-50 will be in excess of $1,500,000, 
spread over radio — which will get 
more than 50 r /r of the total — news- 
papers, magazines, and point-of-sale. 
When Crosby first started his tape- 
recorded Minute Maid show, he was 
heard in only five markets. The past 
several months have seen that number 
increased to 13, extending as far West 
(Please turn to page 45) 



4 JULY 1949 



23 



(fe^2 



The case for 
and against 




Per 




Most stations that have a lot 
of per-inquiry advertising on 
the air are outlets unable to 
sell time nationally to regular sponsors, 
or are stations that have developed such 
a mail-order business that they find it 
highly profitable to take PI deals. No 
one really likes per-inquiry advertising. 
Agencies find it difficult to handle. Sta- 
tions have to check each product to 
find out if the offer is priced fairly. 
If they don't they run the great danger 
of airing PI advertising for a product 
that may kill off a great section of 
that station's listeners. 

PI advertising is in part responsible 
for radio's so-called excesses in adver- 
tising. Per-inquiry copy, by its very 
nature, has to go all-out selling. Since 
it's impossible for the listener to exam- 
ine the product before buying. PI copy 
has to intrigue, picture, demonstrate, 
and finally get the money or order 
in the mail. Most advertising, on or 
off the air, is called upon to do only 
part of this. The final acts, inspired by 
advertising, i.e.. demonstration and 
sales, take place at the local-retail level. 
Advertising's number-one objective is 
to inspire the ownership or use of a 
product. PI advertising has to do that 
and make the sale besides. NaturalK 
that requires a heavier impact on lis- 
tener ear drums. To the listener who 
is not a direct-mail buyer, it can be, 
and frequently is. offensive. Since the 
station, once it has accepted a PI deal, 
must produce direct sales at once to 
collect, it naturallv has the announc- 
ers go to town. 

This is true of both straight PI 
deals and direct-mail deals where the 
advertiser pays for time in the ac- 
cepted manner, but who cancels at 
once as soon as the station fails to pro- 



ii i| ii in advertising 



duce enough direct-mail sales to justify 
its rates. Frequently what is a straight 
PI deal on one station is broadcast by 
another station under a regular rate 
card contract, but with special cancel- 
lation clauses. As soon as direct-mail 
sales fall below a certain figure, in 
conies the cancellation. Thus, the Lit- 
erary Guild may buy Hi Jinx on the 
NBC flagship station WNBC for a min- 
imum contract and "gamble" on pro- 
ducing enough direct sales of member- 
ships to the Guild under the maximum 
cost-per-member, but everyone involved 
in the contract knew that as soon as 
WNBC's audience had been book- 
milked dry, Jinx Falkenburg and Tex 
McCrary would have to find new spon- 
sors — and they did, despite a really top- 
notch selling job for the Guild. This is 
PI advertising with rate-card blessing. 
It isn't loved by anyone in broadcast- 
ing, and there are very few agencies 
equipped to watch all the stations on 
the list for a campaign such as this, 
so that memberships are sold at the 
right cost. 

Has PI advertising any place on 
the air? 

The National Association of Broad- 
casters officially says "no" and does 
its best to discourage it. It does not 
discourage the buying of time for 
direct-mail selling, even though it real- 
izes that it's Pl'ing by firms that can 
afford to do it with cash. Even news- 
papers with the toughest of advertis- 
ing-acceptance rules, such as The New 
York Times, have of late added "shop- 
ping sections" that are really direct- 
mail selling sections. Thus, a great 
metropolitan newspaper recognizes PI 
advertising, for if an advertisement 
doesn't produce enough direct sales in 
a section like this, it isn't run again. 

4 JULY 1949 



There is one outstanding difference 
between printed advertising that is run 
only if it produces direct sales to pay 
off, and broadcast advertising of the 
same type. The reader doesn't have to 
read those advertisements. It's prac- 
tically impossible to avoid them on the 
air if the radio set is tuned to the sta- 
tion carrying them. 

Broadcasters are most concerned 
with per-inquiry advertising that wants 
to get on the air without paying for 
time but only paying for sales. A 
great portion of this type of advertis- 
ing pays such a high percentage of 
the direct-mail sales price as to tell 
the station manager at once that the 
product is dangerously over-priced. 
There's a reducing product direct-mail 
priced at $2.50, with the station get- 
ting $1.00 per order. Harmonica les- 
sons with a "free" harmonica at $1.69 
bring the station $.70. A Lone Ranger 
pen set with belt sells on the air for 
$1.98, with the station getting $.70 per 
sale. This pen set is advertised in the 
merchandise section of The Billboard 
for $.50 in gross lots. The fact that 
another PI operator offered the identi- 
cal pen set to stations to sell on the 
air for $1.00 (the station keeping $.25 
per order) will give some idea of how 
"deals" like this operate. The Lone 
Ranger pen offers were made by an 
agency in New York and a firm with 
a post-office box number in Waterloo, 
Iowa, for an address. The higher-cost 
deal operated from New York. Many 
of the per-inquiry offers are for prod- 
ucts advertised in "merchandise" sec- 
tions of publications like The Bill- 
board, which have high readership 
among "specialty" salesmen. 

The danger to a station in giving 
way to temptation and airing the Lone 



Ranger pen offer at $1.98, while an- 
other station takes the $1.00 offer, 
needs no detailing. Newspapers and 
magazines may have comparative shop- 
pers who are equipped to check "fair- 
value" of advertised products. Obvi- 
ously stations haven't — and everything 
that's said on the air is credited by 
a great majority of listeners as origi- 
nating from and endorsed by the out- 
let. Complete and devastating evidence 
of this is obtainable at any station 
when a situation, or even a word, 
that shouldn't be on the air is broad- 
cast. The switchboards at the stations 
light up like a Christmas tree when 
such a slip passes the microphone. 

Most per-inquiry sold products are 
willing to protect stations by refunding 
full purchase price if the buyer isn't 
satisfied. There's a rub to this. It's 
best explained by reprinting a post- 
script of a letter from a PI agency: 

" will refund the full cost 

to any purchaser through your station 
who is dissatisfied BUT do not make 
this fact part of the advertising copy." 
In other words, the seller will make 
good if the buyer squawks, but do not 
let the buyer know it. 

Some of the direct-mail sellers do 
use the "return if not satisfied and full 
purchase price refunded" appeal but 
they are the exception not the rule. 
Any station with a good listening audi- 
ence can insist on this copy being in- 
cluded in the broadcast commercial, 
but few know this. And even if it is 
included it doesn't help a station if the 
listener is unhappy with a purchase. 
Newspapers aren't blamed if an adver- 
tised product doesn't live up to the 
reader's expectation. Neither are 
magazines. But broadcast stations are. 
(Please turn to page 60) 



25 




Part two of a SPONSOR report 



When 




rolling 



The public as well 
as advertisers must be served when no newspapers are available 




It's the advertisers in news- 
papers who haven't, or aren't 
using broadcast advertising 
who are the most hit by a newspaper 
strike. The advertiser who uses both 
black and white and radio also has 
his problems. 

While the results for non-radio ad- 
vertisers are interesting, it's also im- 
portant to see what happens to regular 
local-retail broadcast advertisers dur- 
ing a newspaper strike. George's Radio 
and Television Company, one of Wash- 
ington's largest appliance dealers, is a 
regular radio and TV advertiser. The) 
use as high as 125 radio announce- 
ments and 60 TV commercials during 
a week. Their agency, during the 
strike, decided that the regular broad- 
cast approach had to be forgotten. 
They used straight price-selling copy. 
Enders, the agency, wrote hard-hitting 
copy, preceded it by a fanfare, and 
then used as many as four prices per 
station break ( 20 seconds I and more 
prices in one-minute announcements. 
The results were, to quote the sponsor, 
"amazing." Actual sales results were 



up over the same pre-Easter week the 
year before. 

How were stations able to accept all 
this announcement business? Most of 
them rightly construed that retail ad- 
vertising was just as much public ser- 
vice as promotional announcements, 
and cancelled all of the latter for the 
duration. On a single station like 
WTOP station-break announcements 
were increased from 36 to 52 per day. 
one-minute announcements from 33 
to 53. 

What do stations do to serve the 
news needs of their listeners? The in- 
dependents that broadcast news at reg- 
ular intervals every hour found no need 
of increasing the frequency of their 
newscasts. The network stations did 
increase their local news coverage, and 
in a number of" cases cancelled their 
national newscasts and replaced them 
with local news shows. While everyone 
recalls the classic example of reading 
the comics that brought the newsreel 
spotlight on New York's late Mayor 
LaGuardia. Washington found that 
reading the comics required a Fiorello. 
and they didn't have one. During the 



one-day strike they did report the do- 
ings of the characters who live in the 
strips, but didn't during the three-da\ 
walk-out. 

WTOP decided that radio logs were 
important, and broadcast the highlights 
of the stations in D. C. that were re- 
quested by the 20 stations in the area. 
That found WTOP (CBS) plugging 
WRC (NBC I. 

WTOP had scheduled its log to run 
in seven suburban weeklies. The strike 
was over before the logs ran, but it 
turned out to be a good promotional 
stunt for the station. This station also 
sent cards ( 10.000 1 listing its news 
periods to every important political 
name in Washington. That also rated 
special comment. 

A few of the advertisers who were 
introduced to the medium through the 
strike have stayed on radio and TV in 
Washington. Most of them reverted 
to their normal newspaper schedules. 
None of them had an\ doubt that 
broadcast advertising had been profit- 
able for them during the newspaper 
void, but broadcast advertising failed 
(Please turn to page 59) 



26 



SPONSOR 




BROADCASTING'S BIG JOB IS TO MOVE PRODUCTS OFF SHELVES SUCH AS THESE THROUGHOUT THE 48 STATES AND CANADA 

How's jour sponsor identification? 



PART TWO High sponsor identification is only part of the 

answer. Is your show selling? 



iHbii The abilit) of a listener to 
^L^U^jUf identify the sponsor of a 
™ * program and the sales effec- 
tiveness of the program do not neces- 
sarily go hand-in-hand. Many shows 
with really low Si's do a top selling 
job for their sponsors. Some adver- 
tisers never look at their Sponsor Iden- 
tification figures because they know in 
advance that they will be low. This 
doesn't mean that all firms with low 
SI indices want them that way. Every 
advertiser would like to feel that his 
product name has been well sold. 

The ache is that selling a product 
name doesn't necessarily sell a product. 

4 JULY 1949 



For years Edgar Bergen had a top 
Sponsor Identification. When Standard 
Brands dropped the wooden-head's 
mentor, the program had an SI of 
51.8, good considering the fact that the 
program was selling both Chase & 
Sanborn Coffee and Royal Puddings. 
The program, however, was not doing 
a good job selling C&S Coffee, despite 
the number of years Charlie McCarthy 
had been delivering an audience for 
that purpose. The low-selling impact of 
this program and its commercials is 
one of the reasons why Standard 
Brands today is not an "enthusiastic- 
sponsor." 



The high critical response to Stan- 
dard Brands' One Man's Family and 
its low SI and sales impact merelv in- 
tensified the great food organization's 
switch from broadcast advertising. 
Sponsor Identification is not enough 
in many cases to sell a product. A pro- 
gram with a high audience rating is 
a great help in selling a product. It puts 
it directly up to the advertising agency 
to build commercials which can turn 
the audience into product buyers. If 
a successful program with a great audi- 
ence doesn't sell, then its time for the 
sponsor to find a new agency, or at 
least a new advertising approach. 



27 



• 



Sponsor iilvnl ideation not 

important to American 

13 i> iiiv B' rod in- Is' proa rams 

Some air advertisers approach the use of 
the medium in the same manner that they 
approach the use of any other advertising 
medium. The medium delivers prospects. 
The advertiser sells them. 



■ 




Frequently Lux Radio Theatre leads 
all programs on the air in audience 
size. Regularly Lux Radio Theatre is 
very near the top in Sponsor Identifi- 
cation. In the Hooper February 1949 
report (sponsor, 20 June) Lux 
Radio Theatre was second with an 86.3 
SI. Only Dr. I. Q. topped it. Neverthe- 
less, in area after area where Lux Radio 
Theatre is heard, Lux Soap is an also- 
ran in product sales. On the other 
hand; Lux , ,Soap Flakes shows a sub- 
stantial sales impact in most areas. 
Marketing experts do not credit the 
success of the flakes to the broadcast 
program, for upon analysis of Lux 
commercials they can discover very 
little "reason why," or "selling copy." 

There can be little question that 
Lux Radio Theatre has real impact. 
Twenty-one-point-seven percent of all 
the telephone homes in America can 
be safely said to listen to and recog- 
nize the sponsor of this program. It 
makes use of endorsement-type com- 
mericals, which have sold facial soaps 
for eons. During its hour broadcast, it 
has plenty of time to impress its 
listeners on why they should buy Lux. 



It has almost as many women-per- 
listening-set as the average daytime 
serial (1.18). It has every attribute 
of a solid-selling vehicle. Lux facial 
soap does not lead the parade. 

Thus, even impact-ratings aren't the 
complete answer to evaluating the 
effectiveness of a broadcast advertising 
campaign. It takes a "consumer pro- 
duct study," something like a Nielsen 
pantry survey to give a really true pic- 
ture of the buying impact of a broad- 
cast program. It's also true that not 
even a pantry check-up tells the entire 
story, and Nielsen's staff research men 
go as far as marking packages to in- 
dicate usage between calls, etc. 

The only method by which the com- 
plete impact of a broadcast program 
could be evaluated is through a con- 
trol sample, and there are many who 
feel that a control sample or consumer 
panel delivers only indicative figures, 
not data that is 100'/ conclusive. Re- 
search men have long hoped for an 
advertiser to come to radio with a pro- 
duct that would not be advertised in 
any other medium but broadcasting 
and which would be introduced to the 



listening audience only through the 
air. They would like the sales organi- 
zation to eliminate, for the test, all 
sales promotion at the dealer level. 
Some radio research men would even 
like to see broadcasting force distri- 
bution as well as sales at a retail level, 
but others, being more realistic, would 
like distribution to be complete at the 
outset of the broadcast advertising 
campaign. Then the effect of the cam- 
paign and radio's impact could be 
measured without other unmeasurable 
advertising factors contributing to 
radios results. Even then there are 
marketing authorities who point out 
that the competitive picture would have 
a bearing that could not be measured. 
They point out that a hard-hitting ad- 
vertising campaign for one trade- 
marked soap flakes, for instance, will 
increase sales of all soap flakes during 
the campaign. They further point out 
that the price of the product will have 
a bearing on its acceptance, as will its 
packaging, dealer discount, and a host 
of other non-advertising consider- 
ations. 

Hooper has conducted surveys for a 



Wendy Warren and the News 30.5 



Juvenile Jury 41.0 % 



Sponsor identification 
important to General 
Foods' programs 

General Foods owns a number of great 
names in the food field. Thus, it's inter- 
ested in associating program name and 
product. When one of General Foods 
program properties is recalled by a lis- 
tener, GF would like her to think of the 
product sponsoring show at the same time. 




]t^< 



Front Page Farrell 15.9 



Hollywood Star Theater 13.9 



number of clients in radio homes that 
listened to the clients' programs. In 
these homes he checked on usage of the 
clients' products before and after cer- 
tain specific campaigns. He has not. 
however, endeavored to develop cor- 
relation figures which would make it 
possible to convert Si's into sales-im- 
pact figures. Marketing experts explain 
that "we wouldn't believe any such cor- 
relation figures no matter who de- 
veloped them." In one type of product 
a high SI would mean a high sales im- 
pact. In the case of another product 
the same SI wouldn't mean a thing in 
the way of sales. 

Certain advertisers, like American 
Home Products, ignore their Si's en- 
tirely. If they didn't, they'd really be 
unhappy. A tabulation of American 
Home Products reveals a top SI of 
22.3 and a low of 13.9. 



Program 



Sponsor Identification 



Front Page Farrell 15.9 

Just Plain Bill 22.3 

Mr. Keen 16.6 

Our Gal Sunday 19.8 

Romance of Helen Trent 20.6 

Anacin Hollywood Star Theater 13.9 

No one questions the advertising 

acumen of the American Home Pro- 



ducts and its subsidiaries. Its daytime 
programs have been successful for 
years and they continue that way. Mr. 
Keen is frequently within the Top 
Twenty Nielsen rated programs on 
the air, and it costs peanuts compared 
with practically every other program 
which it nudges in the TT. 

AHP watches the ratings of its 
programs carefully. It understands that 
Hooperatings. within the limitations 
of telephone homes, or Audimeter- 
measured homes, give it an index of 
the size of the audience for which it is 
paying. It is not interested in establish- 
ing the fact that Anacin. Bisodol. Koly- 
nos, Aerowax, Wizard Glass Wax, or 
any other item is a Whitehall or Amer- 
ican Home Product. Instead, the audi- 
ence it buys is judged as a number of 
ears upon which to imprint "reason 
why" commercials. The commercials 
are rotated, and the schedule is set to 
give the individual product the push it 
requires, when it requires it. No 
attempt is made, except in the case of 
the Anacin Hollywood Star Theater, to 
relate product with program because 
policy may dictate that the program sell 



another product over-night. American 
Home Products looks upon, right or 
wrong, radio as just another advertis- 
ing medium. It judges each "impact," 
consumer's reading or hearing an ad- 
vertising message, as what it's buying. 
Its interest in building a property is 
simply in order to have ears ready to 
hear an advertising message, not to dis- 
play to the world something that be- 
longs to AHP. It's a corporation which 
isn't interested in selling itself to the 
consumer. It is interested in selling its 
products, and while not a great enthu- 
siast about any advertising medium, it 
proves its satisfaction with radio by its 
continued sponsorship of programs. 

Quite the opposite of Standard 
Brands is General Foods' satisfaction 
with broadcast advertising. At the time 
that the Hooper organization made its 
February Sponsor Identification re- 
port, General Foods had 11 programs 
on the networks, with SI indices that 
range from 52.1 for George Burns and 
Gracie Allen, selling Maxwell House 
Coffee, to 22.2 for Gangbusters. The 
latter had been selling for Procter & 
iPIea.se turn to page 42) 



Jack Carson 29.0 



House of Mystery 29.3 



When a Girl Marries 36.9 




Hotel 



ifo* 



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*Rl 



*^1, 







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.■ <• . 







wr*" 




4 




WBRC-FM's tower not only dominates Birmingham skyline but its signal serves 24 Alaba 

30 



ma stations 




When Matt Bonebrake pro- 
posed to a group of AM 
station-owners in Oklahoma 
that they install FM receivers and let 
him feed them sports and special events 
from his powerful KOCY-FM I Okla- 
homa City I transmitter, most of them 
were skeptical. Eastward in Alabama. 
Eloise Smith Hanna proposed to spend 
a quarter-of-a-million dollars and put 
WBRC-FM in full-power operation im- 
mediately. Birmingham bankers insis- 
ted, "you'd be crazy to do it." A 
high-priced example of engineering 
talent shook his head at the notion of 
feeding a network of Alabama AM 
affiliates via FM relav. 

Problems of feeding a network of 
FM stations from a key FM station had 
been solved successfully by the Rural 
Radio Network in New York. But 
critics were skeptical about an FM-fed 
commercial AM network. 

The fact that these pioneering broad- 
casters refused to give up their ideas 
for a network without telephone lines 
has practically meant survival to a 
number of newer stations. To all 22 
affiliates of Bonebrakes Oklahoma 
Group Broadcasters, and to the 24 of 
Miss Hanna s Associated Broadcasting 
Service, the two key stations. KOCY- 
FM and WBRC-FM. provide programs 
for use as both sustaining and com- 
mercial vehicles without the expense of 
lines. Both projects make sports events 
of top local and regional interest avail- 
able to main major network and small 
independent stations that either could 
not afford them or to whom the events 
wouldn't be available for other reasons. 
Fronl both key stations popular 
regional talent and programs, includ- 
ing news coverage not available to 
many local stations, are fed to affiliates. 
These programs are available either to 
national advertisers at the network rate 
over a block of stations or to local 
advertisers at the individual local 
station rate. 

The idea for an Oklahoma AM net- 
work fed by FM occurred to Matthew 

SPONSOR 



WJJM 



Iiiiiii' lines 

••■■■■■■w I •■■■*! lieu**. 



FJI-A.M regional noiuorks. 
minus land lines, are serving state-wide needs 



H. Bonebrake, general manager of 
KOCY and KOCY-FM, who was famil- 
iar with the experiments with FM re- 
lay by Dr. Edwin H. Armstrong. One 
of the first AM-station people to set 
up the simple equipment required for 
the reception of the KOCY-FM signal 
was general manager Milton B. Garber 
of KCRC, Enid, Okla., 70 miles distant. 

Although Bonebrake started his ex- 
periments around 1947, the service 
didn't emerge as a full-fledged opera- 
tion until early in 1949, following the 
erection of a new 938-foot tower radi- 
ating 70,000 watts power. The network 
was born when one of Bonebrake's 
KOCY sponsors wanted to broadcast 
his KOCY program in Tulsa on KAKC 
1 1.000 watts) and in Seminole on 
KSMI (500 watts). 

Before any station could affiliate 
with the Oklahoma Group Broad- 
casters, its market area had to receive 
the KOCY-FM signal with sufficient 
power to guarantee good reception 
under any condition. Engineering 
checks completed, suitable antennas 
and receivers were installed, market by 
market. This was the only expense 
necessary for affiliates. 

A national or regional advertiser 
can buy any number of stations in the 
group. There is no minimum. He pays 
one check to the network, and OGB 
in turn pays each station in accordance 
with its rate. Rates were agreed upon 
between network and affiliates so that 
the final rate to the advertiser would 
be competitive with other media serv- 
ing similar areas. The rates were also 
set to enable combined groups of 
stations to compete in price as well as 
coverage with high-powered stations 
coming into the area. 

KOCY sustaining programs are 
made available to affiliates at nominal 
cost. Each station is free to sell such 
a sustainer locally. Plaza Court Broad- 
casting Co., which owns KOCY and 
KOCY-FM, obtained the network 
broadcast rights to last seasons basket- 
ball games of Oklahoma A&M College 

4 JULY 1949 



and Oklahoma University. These 
games had previously been sponsored 
in Oklahoma City only over KOCY and 
KOCY-FM. 

OGB affiliates got the right to carry 
and sell the games locally for a fee of 
$25 a game. Most did sell them. 

A group of KOCY sustaining pro- 
grams is available to affiliates, and 
most of the independents take full ad- 
vantage of these shows. Major network 
members of OGB take fewer OGB sus- 
tainers. A variety of programs is avail- 
able to appeal to both rural and metro- 
politan listeners. Programing first 
proved a problem because OGB in- 
cluded ABC and MBS affiliates as well 
as independent stations. The network 
has experimented until it feels it now 
offers programs appealing to all im- 
portant segments of Oklahoma 
listeners. 

Many OGB stations claim a local 
daytime audience much greater than 
outside "power" stations, and some of 
them claim night audiences with little 
"outside" competition because of direc- 
tional antennas and nighttime inter- 
ference. Associated Broadcasting 
Service feels this is also the case with 
many of its affiliates. Both feel this 
gives them a strong competitive posi- 
tion, particularly since they can, with- 
out extra charge, localize commercials 
in any individual station market the 
advertiser desires. 

Bonebrake believes his experiments 
were the earliest that led to the actual 
formation of a commercial AM net- 
work fed by an FM station. However, 
Associated Broadcasting Service 
started regular network operation in 
November, 1948, a few months ahead 
of the official debut of OGB. 

The ABS operation, while offering 
similar coverage opportunities to 
national and regional advertisers, dif- 
fers in several important respects. 
Affiliates contract to take the full 17 
hours daily of programing offered by 
the network (6:00 a.m. to 11 :00 p.m. ) . 
More than half of this is live. 




WBRC-FM and the Ala- 
bama Associated Broad- 
casting Service Network 



Like OGB, ABS specializes in sports 
events. The network has acquired full 
broadcast rights to many collegiate 
and professional events, including foot- 
ball, baseball, and basketball games. 
A variety of news, music, farm, and 
novelty programs round out a schedule 
designed to appeal to the widest listen- 
ing preferences of ABS audiences. 

When the time was at hand for 
Birmingham Broadcasting Co. to de- 
cide whether to carry on a limited- 
power interim operation. Eloise Smith 
Hanna, who heads the company, con- 
sulted local bankers and the heads of 
Birmingham business organizations. 
What was the outlook? The unan- 
imous reply was, in effect, "Don't 
throw your money away." 

One man thought differently. That 
was technical Director G. P. (Jerry) 
Hamann. He was convinced that Ala- 
bama's more than 48,000 FM sets sold 
in the last two years would increase 
steadly. He discerned the lean days 
ahead for small AM stations, partic- 
ularly new independent outlets. He 
[Please turn to page 44) 



31 










U, _~g_|__^__g. 






















*BMH 501009, Day-Night Area 

**Sales Management Survey oj Buying Power, May 1949 



MASTER OF 



ALL SURVEYED! 




- 



]ow again in 1949, 50,000-watt kmox is 
the undisputed master of all surveyed, 
inside and outside. In metropolitan St. Louis. 
And throughout 70 bursting-rich counties of 
Mid-America.* According to the new 1949 
cbs-kmox Listener Diary, conducted by 
impartial Benson and Benson, Inc 

IN METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS-kmox is 

way ahead of all competition as usual, with 
the biggest audience in 59.9 ' ', of the total 
504 weekly quarter-hours . . . first in almost 3 
times as many quarter-hours as any other St. 
Louis station. 

THROUGHOUT ALL MID-AMERICA i i is 

first in 78% of all quarter-hours all week 



long... with 6*/2 times as many firsts as any 
other St. Louis station and 3 times as many 
as ALL competition combined! 

Once again— as in 1946, 1947 and 1948— the 
Diary proves kmox is the unchallenged leader 
in two big-buying, big-spending markets: met- 
ropolitan St. Louis, where city-dwellers buy 
all kinds of retail products to the tune of 
nearly a billion dollars a year... and all Mid- 
America, where total retail sales in 1948 
reached a new high of more than two and a 
half billion dollars.** 

To be a leader in St. Louis ... or master of all 
Mid-America — or both— let kmox (or Radio 
Sales) show you how. 

The Louis lmlVI\#^\ 

50,000 watts • Columbia Owned 



NO 

RECESSION 

HERE! 

Retail Sales UP 
BankClearings UP 
Employment III 
Population Ui 



With one and one-half million 
dollars monthly payroll from the 
newly re-activated Camp Gordon 
(14,000 men) plus the seventy- 
two million dollar Clark Hill dam 
in midst of construction plus all 
our industries still running full 
speed . . . well, merchandise is 
still easy to move in WGAC-Land. 

AND 

WGAC billings were up 24% 
first half of 1949 over any pre- 
vious year. 

Advertisers are making real sales 
success histories on — 




580 Kc— ABC— 5.000 Watts 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Avery-Knodel 



34 



RTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . .SPONS 



—continued from page 2— 

72 TV stations on air in 41 
markets for summer 

Television Digest, reporting on state of TV 
health, as of 1 July 1949, states that one out 
of ten families in TV-served areas owned a TV set. 
As of same date, 72 stations and 4 networks are 
on air in 41 markets. TV-program material is 
being furnished by 402 firms, and sets by 
119 manufacturers. 

NBC staff changes in August and 
September. Net still commercial leader 

NBC staff changes will be announced during August 
and September. Commercial time is tighter on 
U.S.'s senior network than on CBS, but the span is 
closing monthly. 

12-month protection for TV advertisers 

urged by station representative organization 

Twelve-month protection on rates in TV is being 
urged on stations by National Association of 
Radio Station Representatives. NARSR is also 
urging that all advertisers be treated alike, 
with no long-term protection for anyone. 

7-8 p.m. children's hour in 
TV; adult peak at 9-10 p.m. 

Children's hour in TV, according to recent survey 
made by WRGB, Schenectady, is 7-8 p.m. It's much 
earlier in radio. Adult audience peaks at 
9-10 p.m. 

S.M.P.E. presentation aimed at 
selling use of film by sponsors 

Motion picture industry, anxious to show advertis- 
ers and agencies that film can be produced 
at reasonable rates if facts of lighting are 
known, went all-out with coaxial-cable showing 
of good and economical use of light 28 June at 
S.M.P.E. meeting. This was motion-picture 
industry attempt to sell sponsors on film. 

West Coast leads in selective radio 
use; drugs lead industry classification 

Selective business on West Coast continues to be 
better than nation as whole. Drug business 
leads industries in selective use during May. 
Rorabaugh report indicates continued healthy 
condition of market-by-market broadcasting. 

SPONSOR 













40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 17) 

coverage picture into proper perspec- 
tive. We circularize regularly 25 
Washington. D. C, agencies as a part 
of the WASH-FM promotion cam- 
paign, and I would like very much, if 
possible, to receive 25 reprints of this 
article so that we can forward same to 
them as one of the mailings in our 
regular promotion campaign. 

It is my feeling that "anti-radio" 1 
propaganda, as you describe it in your 
note, has almost gotten out of hand 
and certainly far beyond the realm 
of facts. Your efforts to evaluate 
properly the importance of all factors 
of broadcasting at this time are, I 
believe, a very commendable objective 
on your part and will, I know, be ap- 
preciated by all factors of the broad- 
casting industry. 

Incidentally, you may be interested 
in the mail received from one single 
spot announcement made on 7 May. 
requesting mail from FM listeners to 
WASH-FM commenting on baseball 
reception. This single 30-second an- 
nouncement offered no gimmicks, give- 
aways, or any other inducements for 
writing — it was a simple request to 
find out the reaction of the baseball 
audience to reception on FM. It tells 
the story that I am prone to believe 
too many agencies and advertisers are 
overlooking. 

FM rates are very low compared to 
AM rates as of now. and it is my 
feeling (in many cases particularly re- 
garding small advertisers who cannot 
afford heavy radio budgets ) that ad- 
vertising on FM stations progressive 
enough to program specifically for the 
FM audience is a good "buy" based 
upon the cost per thousand listeners. 
This might at an early date be an ex- 
cellent subject for you to investigate — 
perhaps publicize. 

Everett L. Dillard 
General Manager 
WASH-FM 
Washington, D. C. 



SUMMER SERVICE TEST 

WNEWs "Summer Service" which 
was inaugurated Decoration Day week- 
end 1948 was, we believe, a pioneering 
project in an aggressive, planned cam- 
paign by a local station to build audi- 
ence during the vacation months in 
{Please turn to page 39) 




The Second Most Famous 
Amateur Pianist in Washington 

Although his recitals are never reviewed by music critics, 
he, like the gentleman in the White House, plays to a vast 
audience. By Carnegie Hall standards his keyboard per- 
formance may be limited, but in his professional field his 
technique is widely admired. 

As one of the networks' best known news commentators 
he displays the same desire to get behind the news that 
he discloses in his recreational curiosity about the in- 
nards of a piano or organ keyboard. His nightly "top 
of the news as it looks from here" is heard by an esti- 
mated weekly audience of 14,000,000 listeners — and even 
his severest critics acknowledge his great influence. 

His broadcast — the Fulton Lewis, Jr. program — is cur- 
rently sponsored on more than 300 stations. As the 
original news "co-op" it offers local advertisers network 
prestige at local time cost, with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there are more than 500 MBS stations, there may 
be an opening in your city. If you want a ready-made 
audience for a client or yourself, investigate now. Check 
your local Mutual outlet — or the Co-operative Program 
Department, Mutual Broadcasting System, 1440 
Broadway, NYC 18 (or Tribune Tower, Chicago, 11). 



4 JULY 1949 



35 




Mr. Sponsor asks... 



r How can the buying of selective radio time be 
made as easy as the buying of network time?" 



Joe V. Getlin 



Manager, cereal sales and promotion 
Ralston Purina Company, St. Louis 




The 

Picked Panel 
answers 
Mr. Getlin 



Under any con- 
ceivable system 
of buying selec- 
tive radio or TV 
time, it cannot be 
made as easy as 
the purchase of 
network time. It 
is always easier 
to buy quantities, 
but quality is 
nearly always purchased with more 
care and selectivity. The very nature 
of selective radio or TV timebuying 
demands more selection, more re- 
search, more careful attention to the 
individual sponsors needs in the spe- 
cific places where his advertising dollar 
can be most effective. 

Buying time to promote one of 
Allieds house-brand lines is a perfect 
example. The only possible way for 
us to cover our oO-odd stores properly 
with the right time on the right sta- 
tions for the right audience would be 
time bought either through present na- 
tional selective channels, or locally. It 
would be very easy for us to buy a 
network show for the same promotion: 
the spot way would be much harder 
to undertake. But, for us the use of 
national selective broadcasting is the 
only way to guarantee maximum re- 
turn, proper coverage, and complete 
coverage to fit our needs, no matter if 




such timebuying methods are harder. 

The buying of selective radio and 
TV time can be made easier by a cen- 
tral research and a "clearing house" 
type of set-up. But. from my seat. I 
cannot see any possible way to make 
it as easy as network timebuying. 
Walt Dennis 
Radio & TV Director 
Allied Stores. N.Y. 



This is a good 
question, because 
in spite of all the 
old adages, it is 
still a good prin- 
ciple of salesman- 
ship to make it 
easy for the pros- 
pect to buy. But 
let us not, in our 
desire to make 
life easier, lose the most important 
thing we want to buy. namely, adver- 
tising impact in our best markets, 
where customers are most responsive, 
where they have the money to buy. 
with advertising at the time best cal- 
culated to reach our specific customers, 
and at the lowest cost-per-thousand of 
listeners, and per case of sales. With 
the warning that easy buying is not by 
any means an important consideration 
in broadcast advertising. I suggest the 
following ways to make buying of 
selective advertising easier: 
1. Analysis. In the competitive era that 
is upon us. with the need for larger 
advertising expenditures at low per- 
centage cost to sell, close analysis of 
sales figures and markets is the first 
iequirement. If we know where we are 
now selling our products, what the 
total market is by states, including 



cities, rural and urban, by sizes and 
styles, we then have the beginning of 
an easy way to buy broadcast time. 

2. Travel. Those who are buying time 
on broadcast stations will benefit enor- 
mously by seeing the United States: its 
great size and potentialities, its activ- 
ities, its local needs and habits, its 
divergencies. Several large agencies 
have established the practice of having 
their time buyers visit stations and 
markets. All agree that such experience 
is helpful and beneficial to the buyer of 
broadcast time. 

3. Your Program. A knowledge of 
what program you need to sell your 
product will make buying easy. Is it a 
time signal, a service report on the 
weather, a jingle, a 15-minute news 
program, a half-hour dramatic show, 
a baseball game, or football, or Roller 
Derby, or other sports package; or is it 
popular songs or comedy, or a broad- 
cast of the opera? Somewhere there 
exists the program best calculated to 
sell your goods as newscasts sell Esso 
and Peter Paul Mounds; as time sig- 
nals sell Bulova and Benrus: as sports 
broadcasts sell gasoline, beer, cigars, 
and safety razors: as dramatic shows 
sell Skippy Peanut Butter and La Rosa 
Macaroni. 

Close analysis of sales, and markets, 
and product, and program furnish the 
foundation on which to buy time. And 
such fundamental knowledge makes it 
possible to buv time quite simply, with- 
out the waste of unproductive markets, 
without wide variations in unproduc- 
tive time periods, with the purchase of 
time on specific stations, and with the 
piling-up of enormous impact. 

Frank M. Headley 

President 

Headley-Reed Co., N. Y. 



36 



SPONSOR 




In my opinion, 
this cannot be 
accompl i s h e d , 
because it is like 
comparing the 
problem of pur- 
chasing 26 four- 
color pages in 
Life with that of 
running a local- 
ized newspaper 
campaign, nation-wide, because the 
work involved in determining papers 
and markets is overwhelming when 
compared with determining rates for 
one publication. However, improve- 
ments can be made along the following 
lines: 

1. Complete standardization of TV 
and radio rate cards. There are a great 
many improvements possible in both 
radio and TV rate cards. Because we 
have had selective radio advertising for 
a great many years, in many cases rate 
cards have generally become standard- 
ized. This was undoubtedly accomp- 
lished by experience and practice. 
However, the television rate card of 
today needs a complete standardization 
as soon as possible, so that as new TV 
stations go on the air, their rate cards 
will conform with the form used by TV 
stations already in operation. In most 
cases today, each TV station produces a 
rate card without any consideration as 
to how the other TV stations have set 
up their rate cards; in many cases. 
they do not show the type of equipment 
available to the advertiser, particularly 
in reference to the Baloptican and also 
the size and number of the projectors a 
TV station has. The Baloptican prob- 
lem is a very important _one, partic- 
larly for advertisers using clocks or 
movable electric equipment. 

2. Standardization of the exact num- 
ber of words alloivable in a live station 
break. In some cases the station states 
the number of words available, in 
other cases they state the number of 
seconds available, in still others the 
station states both. Here again, stan- 
dardization of the length of copy avail- 
able to the advertiser is extremely 
important. 

3. Standardization of rate-protection 
structures for both radio and TV sta- 
tions. This is a very important problem 
in both the purchase of radio and 
television time. Here, too, TV stations 
are notoriously lax in supplying com- 
plete standardized data that can be 
readily and easily interpreted. Many 
TV stations give nebulous answers re- 

( Please turn to page 46) 



^eefiJftus'\o 



TO A SPONSOR'S EAR 



WCFL 

8:00- 9:00 P««- 



9:00- 9:30 p.m. 
T0:15 .U:00P.«". 
U :00-l 1:30 p.m. 



u«nv Orchestra 

* Music Lovers Hour 

MUSIC w" Cream 

for Goldenrod Ice <-re 

rfty Concert 



Community *•«- 

for Community Bullae 





*After two years' sponsorship of Music Lovers Hour 
had developed a permanent mailing list of 25,000 
listeners who were sent the monthly program lists 
of selections to be played on the program, Goldenrod 
decided to eliminate "deadwood" from the list and 
to verify the continued enthusiasm of these listeners. 

In March of this year the entire mailing list was 
cancelled. Announcement was made that names 
would be restored only upon specific request of the 
listener. Reacting immediately, the majority re- 
quested that their names be placed on the new list, 
which is as great today as it was before the cancella- 
tion. Seldom has the validity of a mailing list been 
so conclusively demonstrated. Seldom has the loyalty 
of an audience been so conclusively proved. 



WCFL 

50,000 watts • 1 000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 

An ABC Affiliate 



4 JULY 1949 



37 



Hooper * 
Says: 



WSJS 

STAYS 

ON TOP! 



• Morning 

• Afternoon 

• Evening 

•Hooper Station Listening Index 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

December, 1948 



No. 1 Market 

IN THE 
SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

AFFILIATE 

Represented by 
HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



|>.S. {Continued from page 16) 

franchises during the strike, and the company is setting up new 
distributors in several areas. Also awaiting resumption of the cam- 
paign are dealers and distributors who have signed for the series on 
.30 new stations and two regional networks. Columbine (Colorado) 
and Arrowhead I Minnesota I . 



p.s. 



See: "The automotive picture" (Parts One. Two) 

IsSlies: 14 March 1949, p. 21; 28 March 1949 p. 26 

SllbjeCt: Latest broadcast advertising develop- 
ments in the automotive field. 



Television is due for a big play in the fall advertising plans of the 
country's leading automakers. Three General Motors divisions, Chev- 
rolet. Buick. and Oldsmobile. will be using TV as the virtual corner- 
stone of their fall broadcast advertising plans. Chevrolet, industry 
sales leader and largest dollar-volume advertiser for a single line in 
the auto field, is setting the G-M pace. Chevrolet will continue the 
Monday-night NBC telecasts of Chevrolet on Broadway, and has lined 
up some impressive fall programing through the Campbell-Ewald 
agency. Coming up fast for Chevrolet is a heavy sports schedule in 
TV, the auto firm having purchased the network telecast rights to the 
Notre Dame football schedule for over $100,000. Also coming up. 
although later in the fall, is a big-time 30-minute variety package on 
CBS-TV, Inside U. S. A., a biweekly show, with a whopping $25,000 
talent cost for the half-hour, that will alternate with Jack Benny on 
TV. The Chevrolet dealer group in New York, already on the air 
with the high-rated Winner Take All on WCBS-TV. will scan a TV 
kinescope series, of West Coast origin, called Pantomime Quiz. In 
addition, the New York Chevrolet dealers may possibly sponsor the 
Roller Derby on WJZ-TV. as well as filmed weather spots on several 
New York TV stations. Other Chevrolet dealer groups, notably in 
Boston, are following the lead of the New York organization in get- 
ting into TV to sell Chevrolets in a softening auto market. 

The other two G-M divisions. Buick and Oldsmobile. are also deep 
in fall TV plans. Buick is sponsoring, through the Kudner agency, 
its new Olsen & Johnson package. Fireball Fun-For-All, on NBC-TV, 
and is going the limit on promotional activities surrounding the show. 
Oldsmobile is sponsoring TV news, and expects to expand its visual 
advertising sometime after Labor Day. 

The Ford Motor Company, long one of the leading auto air adver- 
tisers, will rely heavily on the visual medium this fall. Fords hour- 
long radio Ford Theater on CBS goes off the air as of 1 July, and 
no plans have been announced by Ford, or Ford's agency, Kenyon & 
Eckhardt. for a return to network radio selling. The Ford Television 
Theater, however, will step up its frequency as of this October to an 
every-other-week operation, telecasting dramatic shows on Friday 
nights. 9-10 p.m. Tentative plans, now in the works, call for a weeklv 
operation, beginning sometime around January of 1950. In addition. 
Ford will continue its use of selective radio and TV announcement 
campaigns. Meanwhile, the Lincoln-Mercury Dealers have been 
going all-out in their promotion of CBS' Toast of the Town, and the 
Ford Dealers have whooped it up for Through The Crystal Ball. 

Radio continues to do a less spectacular, but still efficient selling 
job for auto sponsors. Kaiser-Frazer has been meeting with success 
in its recent special promotions via Walter Winchell on ABC. K-F 
has been plugging on the air the fact that its salesmen will offer 
10.000 people weekly the chance to use a Kaiser or a Frazer car. 
free, for a day's driving, the salesmen making their calls just as Win- 
chell signs off. Among auto dealers, too, radio is doing its job. Some 
364 stations now carry, and 1.089 Chrysler-Plymouth dealers are 
sponsoring the e.t. Sammy Kaye Shouroom thrice-weekly. 



38 



SPONSOR 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 35 I 

strategic out-of-the-home areas, not 
usually reached by audience-measur- 
ing services ... in particular, beaches 
and autos. The service, as you know, 
was sold to Norge, which has returned 
again this year, three months earlier. 
Basically, the service consisted of 
approximately eight daily spots, plug- 
ging public recreational facilities, giv- 
ing beach and tide information, sug- 
gested motor trips . . . and. on week- 
ends, hourly bulletins reporting traffic 
conditions on all major highways in 
and around Metropolitan New York. 
New Jersey, and Connecticut! . . . 
To obtain these up-to-the-minute traffic 
bulletins, WNEW Special Events De- 
partment had to arrange its own 
special traffic-news-gathering set-up in 
cooperation with a dozen different 
police departments in the area. 

Another feature of the service was 
special material in the daily afternoon 
two-hour Music Hall Show — i.e. dedi- 
cating numbers to beach parties, differ- 
ent resort communities, etc. ... in ad- 
dition, a special promotional tie-up — 
aimed at reaching the auto audience — 
was made with The Good Humor Corp. 
WNEW was plugged on all Good 
Humor cars, via posters ( as you know, 
these are always stationed at major 
highway points), plus plugs on backs 
of all Good Humor wrappers. In 1949. 
the Summer Service will be basically 
the same . . . traffic news, beach 
material, travel tips, etc. . . . plus an 
important new promotion tie-up de- 
signed to hit auto listeners .... a 
tie-up with the Automobile Club of 
New York . . . Club is getting a half- 
hour musical series of its own (music 
plus AA Travel tips, etc.. safety plugs, 
etc. ) . . . WNEW. in turn, gets large 
posters in each of the AA's branch 
offices in Metropolitan N. Y. . . . 
posters in each of the several hundred 
AAA official garages in this area . . . 
plus nearly 100.000 mailing inserts 
during the summer in AAA Club mail. 

Results from last year? .... Well. 
originally the Summer Service was 
designed as strictly a sustaining public 
service project . . . but when the 
publicity broke, the sales department 
was able to sell the service almost 
immediately . . so actually the Sum- 
mer Service is a Triple Threat project: 
public service — good business — and a 



wonderful audience-promotion device. 
. . . According to Pulse, WNEW's 
summer rating 8 a.m. -8 p.m. (June. 
July. August) went up 12 'v in 1948. 
as compared to the previous summer 
. . . which is probably traceable to Sum- 
mer Service . . . and we had no way 
of measuring the audience increase on 
beaches and in cars, (although this 
year we intend to make special sur- 
veys). As for direct audience reaction 
... we offered listeners a listing of all 
the public swimming pools in New 
York City . . . and this simple offer 
regularly drew an average of a 1,000 
requests a week . . . and the station 
also received anywhere from 50 to 100 
phone calls a day following up the 
summer spots, with requests for addi- 
tional information. . . . 

Richard Pack 
Special Events 
WNEW, New York 



Your recent reprint of Radio Is 
Getting Bigger is really worthwhile 
sales ammunition. 

Kay Mllviiiiu. 
Promotion Department 
KSFO, KPIX, San Francisco 

£ These and the letters reprinted in SPONSORS 
last issue are representatives of the hundreds of 
comments SPONSOR has received on this article. 
Thousands of reprints have been distributed. 



FEDERATED NAB 

Congratulations on your very ex- 
cellent article on A Federated NAB. 

I agree with you that something 
must be done to separate the activities 
of the three methods of present-day 
broadcasting. Otherwise, the NAB will 
cease to justify its existence. 

Louis N. Howard 

President 

Coastal Broadcasting Co. 

New Bern, N. C. 



RADIO IS GETTING BIGGER Recently, I have noticed with grow- 

Your- article titled Radio Is Getting ing appreciation and enthusiasm the 

Bigger is a doozie. improved coverage job on the FM 

Aaron Beckwith segment of the radio industry being 

Commercial Manager done by SPONSOR. I can assure you 

WAGE, Syracuse {Please turn to page 42) 



Yes 



KFYR 



550 KC 



5000 WATTS 



NBC AFFILIATE 
BISMARCK. NO. DAKOTA 



comes in loud and clear in a larger area 
than any other station in the U. S. A. 




-#- 



4 JULY 1949 



39 



an open letter to 
Bill Rine, WWVA... 












.11 optimis*" i dca * 



,1 ptlmis» — 



U F . -Tl opti»i» m vxa . fltAoD 



C9 »pbeU and » ^ the alr . ^^ 

le fs sell optics ^---aMMSiJflf^^fS?^ 






-«+B beaggS aT< r — r«« r before* 
2. i-S| J:iS fe^r^era^ s'^ con6 umer of ^ is barte 



♦ do you have to gain? coiro onsenee co.»«ci*l* a 

What do you campaign °r o 

.*,. expense of jWgSN*- yo» •*»* * * , ne69Beo local* 

tSS-TS- ^^ it de an d appreciation of —— 

*• 5 S*"-*- t „ business conditio g^ 

v^tlal »«*".£& psychology 1 and 
2 k substanx l9 aostly P 

SSTS^— ° ptiBl6 " ) - rf rt olo advertising at 






irf eet behind an aggr 
, of stations fould f eirery ,„ere. 
lt hundreds of s „ lU be felt 

campaign the r 

, aVb6 are lAgb. ™ 1B SI 

The staxes »* • / 



Uorman tu 



teolTUucmoss mo. 



-Let's sell opti»i*»" 

^irs^- iiibehappy 



# . # and all other 
station managers 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 39) 

t hat a continuation of this trend will 
ultimately be greatly beneficial to your 
fine publication. 

In the 6 June issue, which I have 
misplaced, there was an article recom- 
mending changes in the NAB. This 
proposed "Federated NAB"' fits ex- 
actly with the need of the radio indus- 
try in general. 

As secretary of the FM Association. 



1 have long upheld a stand by that 
organization, in regard to rumored 
mergers with the NAB. that the FMA 
should only consider such an affiliation 
if the FMA were to be an autonomous 
group along with other such autono- 
mous groups under the general over- 
all association. My proposal fits al- 
most completely with those outlined in 
your article. 

My station resigned from the NAB 
nearly a year ago because our mem- 
bership proved of no value to us. I 
w ill vehemently oppose any merger 
until and unless it is presented under 




such terms as outlined in your Fed- 
erated NAB. 

Since I misplaced the only copy 1 
had of the story, I should appreciate 
receiving an additional two copies of 
that issue, if they are available. You 
ma\ bill us when they are mailed. 

I should like to comment, now. on 
an item in Sponsor Reports of the 20 
June issue. The item was headed. 
"FMA Tries Tearing Down AM to 
Build Up FM." I would like to say 
that it was past time for such vagaries 
as the ABC cut in Chicago of FM 
broadcasting hours, to be exposed pub- 
licly. If I may. I should like to 
quote from a letter I recently received 
from Major Edwin H. Armstrong in 
which he was discussing another mat- 
ter. It seems to apply equally here: 

"In the old days the attitude of 'the 
public be damned' was usually kept 
under cover. Now it is brazenly 
brought out into the open, and people 
who try to do things in this world 
which are manifestly in the public in- 
terest are subjected to open attack for 
disturbing the vested interests. It is 
about time that they were called." 

I think that it is obvious that FMA 
does not need to tear down AM to 
build up FM. AM has long been tear- 
ing itself down. The FMA mereh 
needs to present the facts, which is all 
that was done in connection with the 
Chicago ABC development — or rather, 
retardation. 

E. J. HODEL 

Manager 

WCFC. Beckley. W. la. 



Hoesuf-Ktutael, 9hc. radio station representatives 



AFFILIATED WITH 



KOMA 



, OKLAHOMA CITV 



SPONSOR IDENTIFICATION 

"I Continued from page 29 1 

Gamble up to the Hooper November 
1948 report. At that time it had an SI 
of 31.5. Its shift from P&G to General 
Foods lost it one-third of its P&G SI. 
That's not surprising. What Gangbust- 
ers will do in the future is another 
question. 

It's not surprising that substantial 
Sponsor Identifications are returned 
by most General Foods programs, 
without the Si's being in the strato- 
sphere. General Foods seldom switches 
products sold on a program until it 
feels that the program has sold the 
great portion of its audience on the GF 
product being advertised. Its low SI 
programs are frequently shows selling 
two or more General Foods products 



42 



SPONSOR 



Contests and Offers 



a SPONSOR monthly tabulation 



PRODUCT PROGRAM 



CANTON WHOLE- 
SALE GROCERY 


Canned 
foods 


\ Date With MTWTF 
Fame 10:30-10:35 arr 


Canned foods. 


Li~tener called must answer ph~ne 
saying "Fame famous for flavor." 


KHMO 

Hannibal, 
Mo. 


CHRYSLER CORP 


PWmouth, 
De Soto 


Fit The TiKrdav 
Jackpot 10-10:30 pm 


Chance to hit iackpot via 
telephone. 


S«nd post card with name, address, 
telephone number to program, N. Y. 


CBS 


CROSLEY CORP 


Radios, 

TV sets 


Who Said 
That 


Saturdav 
9-9:30 pm 


Crosley portable radio, plus 
cumulative jackpot. 


Listeners send in a 50-word or less 
"All Time Quote" on a specific 
weekly subiect. including where, 
how and when it was said, to pro- 
gram, N. Y. 


NBC 


E. 1. du PONT DE 
NEMOURS & CO 


Institutional 


Cavalcade 
of America 


Monday 
8-8:30 pm 


Booklet entitled "Nylon Gives 
You Something Extra." 


Send name and address to sponsor, 
Wilmington, Del. 


NBC 


GENERAL FOODS 


, 7 ■ When a Girl 
Va " cln Marries 


MTWTF 
5-5:15 pm 


Swansdown recipe folder for 
"guessing gone" cakes 


Send na-ne and address to sponsor, 
Battle Creek, Mich. 


NBC 


GENERAL MILLS, 
INC 


Cheerios Lone Ranger 


MWF 
7:30-8 pm 


Grand prize: $3,000. First 

prize: $1,000. Ten prizes of 

$100 each: twenty five prizes 

of $10 each. 


Identify Mystery Deputy and send to 
program, Minneapolis. 


ABC 


T. J. KURDLE CO. 


„ . It's Fun 
Meat To Cook 


MTWTF 
12:45-1 pm 


Book, "The Joy of Cooking," 
and 10 theatre passes for cor- 
rectness and promptness. 


Listeners must answer five true and 
false statements about cooking. 


WFBR 

Balti- 
more, 
Md. 


LEVER BROS CO 


,, . Lux Radio 
Various Theatre 


Monday 
9-10:00 pm 


Sterling silver "Neptune's 
Daughter" scatter pin. 


Send 35tf and two Lux Toilet soap 
wrappers to sponsor. Cambridge, 

Mass. 


CBS 


LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO, 
INC 


Chesterfield 
Cigarettes 


Chesterfield 
Supper Club 


MTWTF 
7-7: 15 pm 


Carton of Chesterfields, if 
letter is read on air. 


Send letter telling why you smoke 
Chesterfields to sponsor, N. Y. 


NBC 


P. LORILLARD CO 
EVERSHARP, INC 
SFEICEL CORP 


Old Gold Cig 
Pens, razor 
Watch band 


Stop the 
Mucic 


Sunday 
8-9 pm 


Various cash, merchandise 
prizes. (Minimum $1,0001. 


Listeners called must identify tune 
played plus "Mystery Melody." 


ABC 


MANHATTAN 
SOAP CO 


Sweetheart We Love 
Soap And Learn 


MTWTF 

11:15- 
11:30 am 


Lady of the Land — Rodgers 
Silverplate 


Send three Sweetheart Soap coupons 

and 25c to sponsor, Wallingford, 

Conn., for teaspoon. 


NBC 


MARS, INC 


"Snicker" „ j Q 
Candy Bars 


Mcndav 
9:30-10 pm 


Various cash prizes for ques- 
tions and sketches used on 
the air. 


Send brief sketch of famous per- 
sonality and/or set of "Right & 
Wrong" statements with 6 "Snicker" 
wrappers to program, Chi. 


NBC 


NICKLES BAKING 
CO 


r, , , , Nickles 
Baked goods Quizmaster 


MTWTF 
9:45-10 am 


Money, with sum increased 
each day question goes un- 
answered. 


Telephone contestant asked to 
answer question. 


WTRF 

Bellaire, 

Ohio 




,» Lunch At 
Var.ous U5Q 


MTWTF 

12:15- 

12:45 p.m. 


Merchandise prizes awarded 
daily 


Various studio contests. (Quizzes. 

stunts, assignments, jingles). Listener 

contest changes weekly. 


WWDC 

Wash- 
ington, 
D. C. 




Various Market 
Foods Basket 


MTWTF 
10-10:15 am 


Radio, mixer, toaster, and 
waffle iron. 


Send recipes to program. Canton, 
Ohio. 


WCMW 

Canton, 

Ohio 


PARTICIPATING 


Various 


Reid's 
Record Shop 


MTWTF 

2-5 pm 

When Detroit 

Tiger games 

are not 

carried. 


Different gift in each spon- 
sored 15-minute segment, plus 
cumulative jackpot. 


Listeners called must identify tune 
played. 


WHFB 

Benton 

Harbor. 

Mich. 




Various 


1370 
Streamliner 


MTWTFS 
5-5:40 pm 


Carton of Camels. 


Listeners asked to identify orchesrta 
leaders, songs, etc. 


WFEA 
Man- 
chester, 
N. H. 


QUALITY 

BISCUIT CO 


MTWTF 
Crackers ^% y or 11:30- 
^ ay 11:45 am 


Bedspreads 


Contestant must identify song. 


WDUZ 

Green Bay. 

Wise. 


ROGERS 


Women's 
apparel 


Mr. Mystery 


MTWTF 
9-9:30 am 


Savings bonds, assorted 
prizes. 


Telephone contestant asked to identify 
"Mr. Mystery." 


WFEA 
Man- 
chester. 
N. H. 


TRU-ADE 

BOTTLING CO 


Tru-Ade 


Sweet vs. 
Swing 


MTWTF 
5:15-5:30 pm. 


Cases of Tru-Ade. and a port- 
able radio. 


Listeners sending in best letter on 
sweet music, and best letter on swing 
music daily receive case of Tru-Ade. 
Listner sending in best letter of week 
awarded portable radio. 


WWDC 
Wash- 
ington, 
D. C. 




4 JULY 1949 



43 




YOU NEVER KNOW 

YOUR REAL FRIENDS 

UNTIL YOU GET IN TROUBLE! 

OVER 900 Calls in 6 Vi hours . . . 

May 24th was a normal day 
at WMBD . . .then BANG . . . 
bedlam broke loose! A 
transformer burned out and 
for the next 6V2 hours, 
WMBD was off the air and 
WMBD's switchboard opera- 
tors handled a call every 20 
seconds! 

During this time, an ava- 
lanche of over 900 telephone 
calls was received from 
people clamoring to know 
about WMBD's power fail- 
ure, the first serious break- 
down in over 20 years, and 
about their favorite WMBD- 
CBS programs. 

So . . . what if everything 
did go wrong? The spon- 
taneous interest in WMBD's 
power failure showed clearly 
the station's far-reaching in- 
fluence and that Peoria lis- 
teners do have a favorite 
radio station. 

Yes, WMBD does have a 
loyal audience! 

WMBD DOMINATES Peoriarea 



See Free & Peters 




CDS AFFILIATE 
AM 5000 watts 
FM 20000 watts 



and having two agencies handling com- 
mercials on the vehicle. That's like 
Second Mrs. Burton, with commercials 
for Swansdown flours and Minute Rice 
(27.4 SI), When a Girl Marries, 
( 36.9 ) . with Benton & Bowles hand- 
ling commercials for Diamond Crystal 
Salt and Young & Rubicam doing com- 
mercials for Calumet and Swansdown 
flours, and Portia Faces Life ( 26.4 SI ) , 
with Foote, Cone & Belding handling 
Instant Postum commercials and Ben- 
ton & Bowles handling the advertising 
copy for Post's Bran Flakes. When a 
Girl Marries, being a highly-promoted 
daytime program, with commercials 
for its two products having been fairly 
consistent on the program, rides much 
higher in SI than the other two pro- 
grams that share product sponsorship. 

Meredith Willson hasn't a long his- 
tory of General Foods sponsorship, but 
his very special multiple-voice com- 
mercials build a top identification of 
program with sponsor and product 
quickly. Juvenile Jury, being a quiz 
type of program, also builds a good SI 
quickly. Since the product is not a 
routine air item (Gaines Dog Food), 
it helps the identification problems. 
General Foods' programs ( as of Febru- 
ary, 1949) and their products and 
Sponsor Identification indices are: 

Product SI 

Grapenut Flakes 22.2 

Maxwell House Coffee 52.1 

Raisin Bran 29.3 

Sanka Coffee 29.0 

Gaines Dog Food 41.9 

Jello 34.4 
Instant Postum 

Post's Bran Flakes 26.4 
Second Mrs. Burton Swansdown flours 

Minute Rice 27.4 

Wendy Warren Maxwell House Coffee 30.5 
When a Girl Marries Swansdown. Diamond 

Salt. Calumet 36.9 

General Foods believes in broadcast 
advertising as it believes in all adver- 
tising. It believes in a coordinated sales 
and ad policy, since advertising and 
sales policy is in the hands of one man 
for each division, despite an over-all 
advertising supervision from the top. 

Sponsor Identification indices do 
one thing. They reveal the fact that a 
certain percentage of the listening 
audience knows that a program is com- 
mercial and who is paying the bill. 
Hooper is the first to admit the limi- 
tations of the SI figures, just as he is 
usually the first to admit the limitations 
of any of the ratings which his firm 
issues. A high SI is no guarantee that 
a commercial program is doing a sel- 
ling job. It all depends on what an 
advertiser expects from his show. It's 
true that unless the program has an 
audience it can't sell - - but it's also 
true that programs do a great selling 



job despite the fact that their Si's 
touch bottom. 

SEZ hasn't much of an SI in the area 
in which it's broadcasting — but oh. 
how it sells. * * * 



Program 
Gangbusters 
Burns & Allen 
House of Mystery 
Jack Carson 
Juvenile Jury 
Meredith Willson 
Portia Faces Life 



NO TELEPHONE LINES 

[Continued from page 31) 

believed that WBRC-FM's signal radi- 
ating from a 558-foot tower atop the 
crest of Red Mountain, with 54,600 
watts, could carry programs to every 
250-watt station the length and breadth 
of Alabama. The stations could buy 
programs cheaper than they could pro- 
duce for themselves — and they could 
sell locally for revenue in addition to 
ABS network sales. 

Equipment and studios for the oper- 
ation would cost a quarter-of-a-million 
dollars. Other members of the staff 
were dubious, but Jerry Hamann's 
vision won the day. Miss Hanna said, 
"Go ahead." 

Hamann then went out and sold 
every 250-watter in Alabama, plus sev- 
eral outlets of higher wattage. Half of 
them sold during last May ABS pro- 
grams to local sponsors amounting to 
454 quarter-hours of news, 1,432 
quarter-hours of sports, 936 quarter- 
hours of musical programs, and 94 
quarter-hours of other programs. 

The first sponsor to buy the network 
was the Cosby-Hodges Milling Com- 
pany of Birmingham, which is sponsor- 
ing two daily programs across the 
board for Tulip Flour and Jazz Feeds. 
The LeBlanc Corporation, Lafayette. 
La., makers of Hedacol ( for rheum- 
atism ) , presents Dr. Donovan Reid. 
handwriting expert, Monday through 
Friday. 

A distributor of Admiral radios and 
appliances, Long-Lewis Hardware Co., 
Birmingham, sponsors the Guy Lom- 
bardo Show, a Ziv transcribed produc- 
tion, on Sundays. Air Engineers, dis- 
tributors of General Electric radios, 
underwrites the baseball games of the 
Birmingham Barons. 

At present the FM coverage is bonus 
to network advertisers. ABS network 
operations, as this was written, were 
just $3,000 from the break-even point, 
with enough new business already in 
negotiation to put them in the black. 

Radio is not only getting bigger — 
the inexpensive linking of small-market 
stations via FM relay will provide 
national and regional advertisers with 
additional opportunities for intensive 
local coverage. * * * 



44 



SPONSOR 



MINUTE MAID AND BING 

(Continued from page 23) 

as Chicago and as far South as Miami. 
As Minute Maid gains national distri- 
bution, the Crosby quarter-hour will 
be heard in every major market, with 
the possibility of a daytime network 
program, if all of Vacuum's national 
plans materialize. 

There can be no doubt that Crosby 
has been of infinite help in the pro- 
motion of Minute Maid. From the be 
ginning. Vacuums main pitch has been 
that anyone tasting Minute Maid would 
become a steady customer — that the 
quality and taste of the concentrate far 
exceed those of the fresh fruit itself. 
Bing, aided and abetted by announcer 
Ken Carpenter and a daily guest, and 
using the same informal, congenial 
song-and-chatter technique that in the 
past has so successfully sold cheese 
and radios, continually emphasizes 
this theme of just-try-it-and-see. That, 
coupled with Crosby tie-ins at point-of 
sale and in newspaper advertising, has 
led many consumers, Vacuum believes 
to sample a product, which because of 
its "brash" attempt to improve on na- 
ture, would have had a tougher time 
establishing itself. The magic Crosby 
touch and popularity have done much 
to break down sales resistance, and 
once that has been accomplished, the 
firm feels that word-of-mouth can do 
— and has done — a further sales job. 

The major premise of Vacuum's ad 
campaigns is: Minute Maid orange 
juice is a better product than juice 
squeezed from fresh oranges. The 
company bases that broad statement on 
several things: the concentrate is made 
up of a blend of different oranges, it 
retains the flavor and nutritional values 
of the juice of tree-ripened fruit, it 
has more vitamin C content than there 
is to be found in juice squeezed from 
oranges off a grocer's stand, time and 
effort are minimized in preparing the 
juice (the concentrate returns to na- 
tural taste and strength merely by 
adding three parts of water ) . 

The biggest single victory Vacuum 
has won in its endeavor to overcome 
the normal resistance to canned juices 
as against freshly-squeezed juice came 
with the acceptance by many hospitals 
of Minute Maid. In a number of hos- 
pitals and clinics Minute Maid is be- 
ing used to the exclusion of juice from 
ordinary oranges because of the sani- 
tary angle, for one thing, that makes 
it unnecessary for it to be touched by 




^ 



FIRST IN THE 



QUAD 



DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND, MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



AM 



5,000 W 
1420 Kc. 



FM 



47 Kw. 
103.7 Mc. 



TV 



C.P. 22.9 Kw. visual 
and aural, Channel 



Basic Affiliate of NBC, 
the No. 1 Network 



WOC is the FIRST individual station . 
the only Quad-Cities station . . to 
offer its clients commercial copy analysis. 
On request WOC's Research Department 
tests WOC advertisers' copy for sales 
effectiveness through listening ease and 
human interest . . according to a proved 
formula developed by renowned analyst 
Dr. Rudolph Flesch. All WOC-wntten 
copy is so evaluated. Another in WOC's 
long list of "FIRST'S" ! 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, Manager 



v; 



DAVE N PO RT, I OWA 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 





WHICH IS TALLEST? 

|uoisn||i |e>j|do ud s,4i— „3„ 

But It's No Illusion That 

ADVERTISING 

ON YOUR 

"XL" Stations 
Get Kesults 

Put Advertising Dollars 
to Work the "XL" Way 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 

Eastern Western 



HOOPER REPORTS* 

WAIRadio leads in Winston- 
Salem with the HIGHEST 
rated Day, Night and Sun- 
day Afternoon Half Hours. 

"Continuing Fall-Winter 1948-1949 
Report 




NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



4 JULY 1949 



45 




...//at local 
station cost 

See your station 
representative or write 

WORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W. 57th ST.. NEW VORK 19, N. Y. 



SPARTANBURG-GREENVILLE 
MARKET! 



AIR YOUR WARES OVER 




.t>» 



BO* 6 ' 



Represented By: — 
John Blair & Company 
Harry E. Cummings * 
Southeastern Representative , 
Roger A. Shaffer /l 

Managing Director ~ y 
Guy Vaughan, Jr.. Sales Manager 



CBS Station For The 
Spartanburg-Greenville Market 



5,000 Watts - 950 On Your Dial 

WSPA-AM and WSPA-FM Are Sold As 
A Single Service 



46 



human hands. Vacuum makes much 
of this hospital acceptance in its ad 
copy, plus the fact that it packs Min- 
ute Maid for sale to hotels, airlines, 
and divers institutions. 

One drawback to 100 /> distribution 
of a frozen-food product is the inabil- 
ity of most grocery-store outlets to 
handle frozen foods. Out of the coun- 
try's 450.000 grocery outlets, only 
about 150.000 have the proper facili- 
ties for storing frozen foods. Vacuum 
plans to get around this handicap by 
supplying groceries with a special cabi- 
net for Minute Maid juice, letting deal- 
ers have the cabinet on a rental basis 
until they own the containers outright. 
Vacuum expects in this way to be in 
most, if not all, of the country's re- 
tail food outlets within the next three 
years. 

Vacuum and its advertising agency. 
Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield. Inc.. 
New York, have had remarkably clear 
sailing in the promotion of Minute 
Maid. The only threat to their plans 
occurred recently when an awkward 
situation developed at CBS regarding 
the time slot for the Crosby broadcast 
over WCBC. the network's New York 
outlet. The contretemps arose when 
Arthur Godfrey entered a deal to do 
an extra quarter-hour morning net- 
work show for Spray-a-Wave. Cali- 
fornia hairdo outfit, in return for a 
block of the company's stock, and it 
was understood that he would fill the 
10:15-10:30 a.m. time preceding his 
hour coast-to-coast program. 

What complicated things a little was 
the fact that Crosby had been allocated 
the same spot for his Minute Maid 
show. It thus became a case of tran- 
scribing Godfrey and airing him in 
the afternoon in New York, or pull- 
ing Bing out of the time set for him. 
It was at this point that Jock Whitney, 
as a Vacuum Foods guiding light and 
as CBS head man William S. Paley's 
brother-in-law. straightened things out 
to everybody's satisfaction, except God- 
frey's. Crosby remained in the 10:15 
slot. 

Vacuum Foods, off to an excep- 
tional start with its orange-juice con- 
centrate in three short years, plans 
considerable expansion in the future. 
The next step is opening markets west 
of the Rockies, via the California 
plant: then will come complete national 
distribution, set for this coming fall. 
Advertising, particularly broadcast ad- 
vertising, will keep pace with those de- 
velopments. Vacuum feels that its use 
of radio can be extremely flexible. 



since it markets only one product. Al- 
though plans call for the addition to 
the Minute Maid line of other citrus 
fruit concentrates, the company still 
considers that it will be selling just a 
single product. All its future advertis- 
ing will be geared that way. 

Thus far. a sound idea, shrewd mer- 
chandising, and a board director 
named Harry Lillis Crosby, Jr.. have 
combined to put a frozen-food staple 
on grocers' shelves in a big wav. 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

( Continued from page 37 ) 

garding rate protection. Rates are de- 
termined by the number of sets in the 
market, and are increased when the 
higher number of sets is reached. Who 
determines the information regarding 
where the number of sets comes from, 
and how accurate the information 
might be, has never been adequately 
handled. 

4. Coverage. TV stations have not 
established among themselves any 
basic material regarding coverage. 
NBC gives the station credit for all TV 
sets in a 40-mile service radius. C. E. 
Hooper gives the station credit for 
coverage for all TV stations within 50 
miles. Standardization should be 
accomplished quickly. 

5. Program Schedules. In spite of all 
the shortcomings that exist in many 
cases in rate cards for both radio and 
TV. undoubtedly the worst hodgepodge 
of information is submitted to adver- 
tising agencies in the form of program 
schedules for both radio and TV. I 
realize, of course, that radio and TV 
shows change rapidly. TV more rapidly 
than radio. Nevertheless, one single 
form could be set up so that time- 
buyers, secretaries, etc., could de- 
termine what programs a particular 
spot precedes and follows without hav- 
ing to check representatives or stations. 
Wherever possible where spots have 
been sold to advertisers, the adver- 
tisers' names holding these adjacencies 
should be incorporated on the 
schedule. This. I realize, in most cases 
would be a task for the station manage- 
ment, but certainly would pay off in 
the long run. because availabilities, 
subject to final clearance, could be 
picked off the schedules rapidly by 
assistant timebuyers or secretaries. 

Adrian J. Flanter 
Advertising Director 
Benrus Watch Co.. N. Y. 



SPONSOR 






THE BIG PLUS 

(Continued from page 21) 

the game and bring their portables. At 
one stadium in New York, during a 
normal weekday 438 portables were 
brought into the park. Actually, the 
number was no doubt larger, since 
every gate was not under constant 
surveillance by the stadium staff as- 
signed for the day to this survey duty. 
The portable carriers not only listened 
to the broadcast of the games they 
were attending but other games when 
action on the field lagged. 

A year ago, April-May 1948, Hearst 
Publications checked the ownership 
of portable radios in Metropolitan New 
York. Hearst's published figures re- 
ported that 10.7% of New York fami- 
lies (387,200) owned a portable re- 
ceiver. Radio dealers in the city re- 
port that portable sales from May 
1948 to May 1949 have jumped, and 
claim that the current figure would be 
nearer 15%. 

These portable receivers are used at 
picnics, beaches, and wherever people 
gather for relaxation. A check-up at 
Grand Central Station in New York, 
of people going away for the Deco- 



The Biggest Year 
in its 26- Year History 

\ACUSE 




... in 1948 carried the greatest 
volume of advertising ever 
broadcast by a Syracuse sta- 
tion — 

• FIRST in Network 

• FIRST in National Spot 

• FIRST in Local 

• FIRST in Total Advertising 

• FIRST in Popularity with 

Syracuse and Central New 
York Listeners 

• FIRST in Merchandising & 

Promotion 

• FIRST in Coverage Area 

WW m^WTWwr 5 jo kc—5000 watts 

Headley-Reed, National Representatives 

NBC AFFILIATE IN CENTRAL NEW YORK 



ration Day weekend, revealed thai in 
a two-hour period (the only period 
checked) 33% of the non-suburban 
travelers carried portable radios that 
could be seen. How many had them 
in luggage was of course not check- 
able. 

People don't carry equipment away 
for a weekend without having the in- 
tention of using it. Nevertheless, their 
weekend use of the portable sets was 
uncheckable, and no survey reported 
to sponsors what they were receiving 
from this away-from-home listening. 

While a considerable part of out-of- 
home listening is daytime listening, 
this does not apply to auto listening. 
There is. of course, considerable dial- 
ing in cars between 6:45 and 8:03 
a.m. and between 4:30 and 6 p.m. This 
doesn't mean that there isn't consider- 
able automobile-set listening at other 
hours. In a recent Gilbert Youth Sur- 
vey made for NBC, the 13-19 year 
old audience was discovered as listen- 
ing to radio in automobiles between 
9 and 11 p.m. to a considerable extent: 



Time 


% 


liste 


ning in 


auto 


9:00 p.m. 






2.5 




9:30 p.m. 






3.3 




10:00 p.m. 






3.9 




10:30 p.m. 






3.2 




11:00 p.m. 






3.3 





While parent-teacher organizations 
and educators may find this time sched- 
ule something to cavil at (the kids 
ought to be home and in bed), it can 
be seen why composition-of-audience 
figures frequently show so few young- 
sters listening at home. They're just 
not at home. During the same period, 
over three percent are visiting their 
friends and listening to radio in their 
friends' rooms, while .5 percent are 
listening while they work. 

Shifting to another group, the hos- 
pitalized section of the nation, exposes 
another section of radio's unsurveyed 
audience. Even in municipal hospitals 
patients frequently have portable sets 
in wards and semi-private rooms. In 
private hospitals there is generally a 
special radio-rental service, if there 
isn't a special installation in every 
room. Hospitalized men and women 
find radio God-sent while they are ill. 

Most hotels are radio-equipped these 
days. A check-up of rooms by the 
chambermaids in one Chicago hotel in- 
dicated that the radio equipment was 
used by over 65% of the transients. 
(The check-up was based upon the 
switch-setting one night compared with 
(Please turn to page 60) 



Please 
Count Carl 
Out! 




Some station managers are execu- 
tives and let the hired help do all the 
work. 

Please count Carl out! 

Some station managers just open 
the mail and take a peek to see who 
sent in some new business, and then 
go fishing. 

Please count Carl out! 

Then there are station managers 
who take a personal interest in busi- 
ness that comes in, even if it's only 
a one-time spot. 

And that's where you can count 
our Carl in! 

Carl goes over the availabilities 
with a fine toothcomb looking for 
the best times to run spots which 
agencies send in. He's a hard man 
with the traffic dept. and worries 
them half-silly demanding the best 
. . . not just a lot of hand-me-down 
availabilities. The traffic dept. says 
he couldn't be more finicky if it were 
his own money he were spending. 

But then maybe that's why 
WDSM and WEVE are doing such 
a good job for advertisers here in 
our neck of the woods. We admit 
we got a weak signal in Los Angeles 
County, but we really cover the 
Duluth-Superior market and the 
Iron Range with our 2 ABC sta- 
tions . . . which you can buy in 
combination for the price of ONE 
Duluth station! 

Want to make Carl keep his nose 
to the grindstone for you? Then 
check on WDSM (Duluth-Superior) 
and WEVE (Eveleth). Ask any 
Free & Peters man for the lowdown. 



4 JULY 1949 



47 



( 




^ 






SUNSET MANAGES TO DEMONSTRATE ITS TV SETS WHILE ITS PROGRAMS ARE ON THE AIR, SELLING UP TO $400,000 A WEEK 




Sunset puts s:LOOO weekly into TV advertising. It pays off 




The U. S. market for TV and 
radio sets, and for most 
home appliances, has in 
recent months shown all the alarming 
symptoms of softening. Price-cutting 
is common, and in some areas, partic- 
ularly New York, it is hard to sell a 
big set or a large appliance without 
giving a 20$ discount. However, to 
merchandising-conscious dealers in the 
set-and-appliance field, slow sales are 
no reason to reduce advertising. Latest 
nation-wide figures show that almost 
a quarter (24.7 f /( ) of the video adver- 
tising placed at the dealer level is by 
radio, TV, and appliance retailers. 
Selective radio, which in these dealers' 
eyes seems to lack much in not having 
the visual element of TV, receives 
about 8.7'r of the money going to 



radio advertising locally from local 
radio, TV, and appliances business. 

Typical of the dealer-level adver- 
tisers in the field of sets and appliances 
who have found TV to be productive 
sales-wise is a New York one-store 
firm with the ambitiously-pluralized 
name of Sunset Appliance Stores, Inc. 
This firm, currently spending some 
$3,000 a week on New York's WPIX, is 
one of the heaviest TV advertisers at 
the dealer level. About half of the Sun- 
set ad budget is co-op money from 
DuMont and RCA, but the actual dol- 
lar expenditures of Sunset rank it as 
one of the leading advertisers among 
dealers in the set-and-appliance field. 

Sunset, which opened for business in 
the Borough of Queens in the fall of 
1946, is largely the brainchild of 



Joseph Rudnick. a soft-spoken, pro- 
motion-conscious dealer to whom sell- 
ing sets and appliances on a large scale 
is an old story. Rudnick, who used to 
run an appliance store in nearby 
Brooklyn for years, knows his terri- 
tory and his customers the way a 
Queens resident knows his stop on the 
Independent subway. 

As a result of well-planned TV ad- 
vertising and above-average business 
acumen. Rudnick's Sunset Appliance 
Stores (he is president of the firm I 
is doing what amounts to a land-office 
business in TV sets, most of it, sur- 
prisingly, in the large-size models. 
Rudnick has grossed as much as $30- 
$35,000 a week on one of his two lead- 
ing lines (RCA and DuMont) alone. 
Rudnick's business is a steadv. 52-week 



48 



SPONSOR 



business. Nearly a third of the deals he 
closes involve a trade-in on an older 
set, usually a matter of a set-owner 
swapping it in for a set with a larger 
screen than the one he had before. Rud- 
nick is quick to point out that his sell- 
ing operation is not a bargain-base- 
ment one. He does not cut prices right 
and left in an attempt to bring in the 
trade. Sunset has built its business by 
steady advertising, an efficient and re- 
liable repair service (Rudnick has 11 
repair trucks and 40 TV-trained tech- 
nicians), and several ingeniously 
simple merchandising wrinkles. 

From the beginning, the programing 
axis of the Sunset air advertising has 
been sports. Sunset came to TV on the 
5th of December, 1948, for a 13-week 
run on WPIX. The program was a tele- 
cast of the New York Rovers hockey 
game from Madison Square Garden 
on WPIX. Previously, Sunset had been 
a consistent newspaper advertiser, with 
good results, but the return from Sun- 
set's sports sponsorship was a surprise, 
and a pleasant one, for Rudnick from 
the beginning. Sunset was actually in 
the category of "experimenter" when 
they went on the air to sell television 
receivers via television programing. A 
few dealers had been buying spots and 



station breaks, still fewer, such as the 
across-the-board daytime TV program- 
ing of Southern Wholesalers I RCA- 
Victor distributors in Washington) on 
WNBW, had gone in for actual air 
advertising via visual programs. Rud- 
nick felt that television could do a job 
of selling his goods and services, but at 
the beginning it was largely a gamble. 

On the first Rovers hockey game, 
televised on a Sunday afternoon, he 
had the store's phone number flashed 
on the screen several times. Quickly, an 
average of 30 phone calls during the 
show began coming into Sunset. In the 
first week, about 50 people came into 
the store as a direct result of TV adver- 
tising for Sunset they had seen the 
previous Sunday. They bought an 
average of $350 worth of merchandise 
(mostly the air-sold models) for a 
weekly take of $17,500. Nothing con- 
vinces a dealer of the power of an ad- 
vertising medium like a healthy sales 
curve. Rudnick was no exception. Sun- 
set had come to TV. and. as far as 
Rudnick was concerned, there Sunset 
was going to stay for quite awhile. 

At the end of the 13-week contract, 
which ran out in mid-March of 1949, 
Sunset promptly started the sponsor- 
ship of a second TV series. Again, 



SPORTS HAVE HELPED PUT SUNSET ON MAP. IT HAS TELECAST (I) BOXING 



Rudnick chose a sports show. There 
were several reasons for his continuing 
with this type of programing. For one 
tiling, Rudnick knew, from talking 
with his customers and making calls 
on neighborhood bars and taverns in 
Queens, that sports shows on TV drew 
a sizable share of the TV audience. For 
another, WPIX. faced with the prob- 
lem of operating as an independent TV 
station in a major network TV market, 
was trying hard to build up an im- 
pressive "block" of TV sports pro- 
grams, and was promoting them heav- 
ily to viewers. Rudnick saw the value 
of riding the station's theme and was 
quick to buy one of WPlX's top-rated 
sports shows, the wrestling matches 
televised from the Eastern Parkway 
Arena. Since TV-wrestling has a pre- 
ponderantly female viewing audience 
at home, Rudnick changed his sales 
pitch to the distaff angle, and plugged 
hard on the eye-appeal of his sets, and 
on the reliability of his service ogran- 
ization. The commercials grew better 
and more elaborate. Since Rudnick was 
"co-oping it" with firms like DuMont 
and RCA, he began using open-end TV 
films prepared by these firms. Again, 
as it did with the Rovers hockey, the 
{Please turn to page 58) 



4) WRESTLING 









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more than meets the eye 



More than the cameras, the lights, the settings— 
and NBC has the finest the industry can offer . . . 

more, too, than the superb NBC amplifiers, transmitters, 
mobile units — the whole complex array of television facilities . . . 

more than any of these . . . 



July 1949 



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it's experience that makes NBC programs the most viewable in America. 
For back of the varied skills of the NBC engineer, producer, 

director, and cameraman are more than twenty years of NBC -RCA 
experiments in sight-and-sound . . . brilliant innovations, advanced 

techniques, tested and refined on five owned-and-operated stations. 



its experience that has made NBC Television America's No. 1 Network. 



VACUUM 4 li: Wilts 



MEATS 



SPONSOR: The Hoover Company AGENCY: Leo Burnett. Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Hoover Company spon- 
sored the program "At Our House" for a 13-week 
period over WE1NK-TV in Chicago. The show was used 
to promote the Hoover vacuum cleaner, with only one 
broadcast set aside to plug the Hoover iron. For dem- 
onstration purposes, the iron was used to affix "No-Darn" 
mending patches. The "No-Darn" kit was then offered 
to viewers sending postcards to the station. At the 
expiration of the time limit. 1.750 requests for the kit 
had been received as a result of this one-time offer. 
WENR-TV, Chicago PROGRAM: "At Our Holm" 



TV 

results 



SPRING WATER 



SPONSOR: Juengling Meat Co. AGENCY: Placed direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Viewers of the "Kitchen 
Klub. ' the oldest commercial program on WLW-T, were 
shown a Juengling recipe book and were told if they 
would call or write the station they would receive a 
card telling them where to go to the nearest Juengling 
dealer to get the book. Within 30 minutes after the 
program 320 calls were received at the switchboard at 
Mt. Olympus. Eighty calls were received throughout the 
second day. although the offer was made only once, and 
the sponsor received 280 pieces of mail direct. 

WLW-T, Toledo, Ohio PROGRAM: "Kitchen Klub" 



POLAROID FILTERS 



SPONSOR: Office Equipment Co. AGENCY: Placed direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Office Equipment Com- 
pany of Louisville. Kentucky, reported some recent suc- 
cess as a result of using a Polaroid Filter one-minute TV 
film commercial. Company received 12 calls on the day 
following the announcement, and made eight sales directly 
traceable to the TV-advertising. The Shackleton Piano 
Company carried the same announcement the following 
week, resulting in the sale of two more filters by Office 
Equipment to people who remembered the announcement 
of the previous week. 

WAVE-TV, Louisville, Ky. PROGRAM: Announcement 



VAN COMPANY 






SPONSOR: Glacier Springs Water AGENCY: Placed direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On the first "Peter Grant 
News" broadcast sponsored by this company, viewers 
were offered a free gallon bottle of the product deliv- 
ered to their homes, if they would call a given telephone 
number. Three hours after the show, 132 calls had been 
taken; since there was no switchboard, it was impossible 
to judge the number of calls which could not be com- 
pleted. Sponsor found equal success with subsequent 
programs, dropping them only because spring water is 
essentially a seasonal product. 

WLW-T, Toledo, Ohio PROGRAM: "Peter Grant New.-" 



SPONSOR: J. Norman Geipe, Inc. AGENCY: C. D. Ferguson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: John W. Geipe, of the J. Nor- 
man Geipe Van Lines, Inc., reports: "In the 33 years 
that our company has operated in Baltimore, we have 
found our television spots on WMAR-TV to be the most 
productive medium of advertising we have ever used. 
We are in the position of being able to trace directly 
the source of our business, and we have found that 
our WMAR-TV spot has delivered the goods time and 
again." This is only one of many tributes received by 
this TV station from its local advertisers. 

WMAR-TV, Baltimore. Md. PROGRAM: Announcements 



HAIR CREAM 



BOOKLETS 



SPONSOR: Venida Hair Net Co. AGENCY: Placed direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The makers of Venida Hair 
Cream, Venida Hair Net Company, participating spon- 
sors on " . . . And Everything Nice," starring Maxine 
Barratt. offered a jar of Venida hair-dressing cream to 
televiewers. The jar normally retails for $1.50, but on 
this special television offer, viewers could have a jar free 
merely by sending in a Venida hair-net envelope. The 
offer was carried over a period of one week only — at the 
end of which time the company had received more than 
400 envelopes. 

WABD, New York PROGRAM: "... And Everything Nice" 



SPONSOR: None 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On "The Television Shopper," 
WABD's Monday-through-Friday morning half-hour pro- 
gram. Kathi Norris, who conducts the show, recently had 
as a guest a woman from the State Department whose 
job consists of setting women up in careers. This woman 
had just published a booklet entitled "A Business of Her 
Own." and just happened to mention that if any of the 
women tuned in to the program would like a copy, she 
would be glad to send it to them. The one casual men- 
tion resulted in over 500 requests. 
WABD. New York PROGRAM: "The Television Shopper" 




The Fireworks 
Will be a Little 
Late This Year 



Carolinians are holding their fireworks until July 15 this year — the debut of 
the Carolinas' first television station — WBTV — Charlotte. 

For years Carolinians have been looking forward to their own television service — 
a natural outgrowth of the South's Pioneer AM Station, WBT. For months, distributors 
and retailers have been flooding the Charlotte area with television sets. 

TV reception in an area embracing 1,000,000 North and South Carolinians is 
assured from WBTV's Spencer Mountain tower, rising I 135 feet above the surround- 
ing terrain. Effective Radiated Power will be 16,300 watts for video, 8,200 watts for 
audio. 

Contracts already signed with the four major TV networks will give Carolina 
viewers a choice selection of the best in network television programs on film. 

WBTV offers advertisers the first television approach to the south's market-on- 
the-move, a minimum of 16 counties with Effective Buying Income* of close to a 
billion dollars. 

Represented Nationally by Radio Sales 

* $961,964,000 Sales Management— 1949 



Channel 3 




JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 

CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAROLINA 



4 JULY 1949 



57 



spot commercials 

feature films 

programming 

animation 

umsimr 

ENTERPRISES 

Incorporated 



Producers and Creators of 

16mm Motion Pictures for 

Television - Industry - Education 



20 East 42nd Street 

New York 17, New York 

Murrayhill 7 0463 




SCIENTIFIC SALESMAN 

[Continued from page 49) 

grunt-and-groan telecasts from Eastern 
Parkway Arena brought a happy 
gleam to Rudnick's eyes. The business 
at Sunset Stores, at this point almost 
90% concentrated in television sets 
and service, had actually doubled, be- 
tween the time Sunset went on the air 
on WPIX in December 1948 and May 
1949, when the wrestling series ran 
out. 

When the time came to buy another 
TV show, Rudnick took a real plunge. 
Instead of one show, Rudnick bought 
three on WPIX, all basically sports 
shows. The first two were nighttime 
telecasts, boxing from Queensboro 
Arena on Thursday nights, and wrest- 
ling from the Coney Island Velodrome 
on Tuesdays. Both (they are still run- 
ning on the air as SPONSOR goes to 
press) are done with co-op support, the 
former in conjunction with RCA; the 
latter with DuMont. The third show, 
also still a current item, is Sport of Call, 
a 20-minute telephone sports quiz 
which is scanned just before the home 
games of the New York Giants, and 
which is scheduled at a time when it 
gets the benefit of the heavy viewing 
of baseball fans for the Chesterfield- 
sponsored Giant games. 

Like the others, Sport of Call is a 
co-op effort, done in conjunction with 
the makers of Rembrandt TV sets. The 
shows (Sport of Call is usually scanned 
twice on a weekend, before Saturday 
and Sunday games), when not plug- 
ging a particular make of TV set with 
Sunset being identified as the place to 
buy it, is stressing the fact that Sunset 
accepts phone calls for repair service 
as late as 10 o'clock at night. Several 
of Rudnick's own merchandising gim- 
micks are worked smoothly into the 
commercials on the three shows. 

Since a lot of New Yorkers, Rudnick 
has found, are just waiting around to 
see if TV-set prices will tumble down 
when the market is saturated, Rudnick 
offers a written year's guarantee to re- 
fund the difference between the price 
a customer bought a standard make 
for and the new price in the event 
that one of the major companies drops 
the price levels on its TV line. Actually, 
Rudnick is playing it pretty safe. Since 
nearly 95% of the sets he sells are Du- 
Mont and RCA, and since neither firm 
plans any price-cutting moves in the 
near future, there is not much likeli- 
hood that Rudnick will be handing out 



refunds in wholesale quantities. It 
does, however, make a good merchan- 
dising point in the commercials, since 
most RCA and DuMont prices are fair- 
traded and not subject to dealer-cut- 
ting, thus giving Rudnick the edge 
over most of his nearby competition. 
Says Rudnick: "I wish RCA and Du- 
Mont would cut the price on the line. If 
I had to hand out $10,000 in refunds, 
I guarantee I'd get $50,000 worth of 
business out of it from a publicity 
standpoint in the long run. Every re- 
fund check would be a top drawer pro- 
motion. I'll bet 50 to 100 people would 
see each refund check and the name 
of Sunset." 

Rudnick, who knows his New 
Yorkers as generally sound credit 
risks, also plugs away at the time-pay- 
ment plan for buying a TV set as 
another inducement for immediate 
buying. To backstop this, and to 
appeal to viewers who already have a 
TV set, Rudnick offers trade-ins of 
$100 to $500 for TV receivers taken in 
by Sunset toward a newer model. 

Rudnick has a few special shots in 
the sales-promotion locker. One of 
them is to offer a large TV set, usually 
in the $1,000 bracket, to a bar-and- 
grill for a night's trial. By pre- 
arranged coincidence, the set and a 
Sunset installation man usually show 
up on a night when one of Sunset's 
shows is on the air. Smiles Rudnick: 
"Our man tunes the set to WPIX and 
leaves it on. The owner is exposed to 
our commercials and our set most of 
the evening. The combination seldom 
fails." 

Another recent Rudnick-invented 
promotion stunt was to give away two 
choice tickets to a New York Giants 
game to the first person who bought 
a TV set specifically as a Father's Day 
gift. Although the tickets were given 
awav shortly after the announcement 
on the air, several other orders con- 
tinued to come in, the idea prompting 
the action. Rudnick is a great believer 
in promotion, and although his ad 
budget is 100% in television adver- 
tising, he and his sales force try to 
work out a new merchandising wrinkle 
every other week or so. 

The close integration between sales 
and advertising pays off. Some 60% 
of the TV sets sold by Sunset, Rud- 
nick estimates, are sold as a direct re- 
sult of TV advertising. Keeping the 
customer sold on Sunset, just as auto 
dealers trv to keep themselves sold to 
motorists after a car has been pur- 



58 



SPONSOR 



chased, is a continuing part of the 
job. too. The service business is im- 
portant, just as it is to dealers in the 
automobile business, and the service 
end of the Sunset operation receives 
frequent mentions on the air. Rud- 
nick has also found that his business 
is already reaching the point where 
his old customers are bringing in their 
1947 and 1948 model TV sets to trade 
in for new ones, usually asking for a 
screen size larger than their old ones. 
To encourage this, Rudnick usually 
manages to have a heavy neighbor- 
hood store traffic passing through the 
TV department of Sunset on a night 
when one of his shows is on, giving 
visitors a chance to see new-model 
sets in operation. 

Sunset Appliance Stores, Inc. has 
no ad agency. This has been some- 
thing of a problem to Rudnick. His 
account is not big enough to interest 
seriously any of New York's major 
agencies with TV departments, and 
the smaller agencies haven't been able 
to convince Rudnick that they can do 
a job for him in TV. As a result, 
Rudnick has been handling his ac- 
count with WPIX on a direct basis, 
as many TV-set dealers do, and has 
hired a TV-trained girl copywriter, 
Marjorie Shields, to write the copy 
needed for live narration over the 
slides and silent films that tell Sunset's 
sales story visually. Rudnick is a real 
student of TV. going out on remotes 
with the WPIX crews and supervising 
the telecasting of his commercials at 
the director's elbow. With Sunset's 
business growing all the time, doub- 
ling in brass as boss of Sunset and as 
his own agencyman has Rudnick fre- 
quently on the run. 

Rudnick has some big plans for the 
future of Sunset Stores. The plural 
title is no accident. Rudnick intends 
to expand his operation in the next 
year or so. He also intends to con- 
tinue with his TV advertising, now 
averaging nearly five hours of pro- 
graming a week and going as high 
as six-and-three-quarters when Sunset 
is sponsoring a WPIX sports one-shot. 
The existing contracts for Sunset's 
three sports shows run out this fall, 
and renewing each will be a matter of 
scheduling and options, and also, ac- 
cording to Rudnick. "how much 
money I have in the bank." In any 
case, Sunset will definitely continue 
its successful TV advertising, with the 
probable emphasis on sports program- 
ing. The reason is simple: it sells. 



WHEN PRESSES STOP 

(Continued from page 26) 

to collect upon its opportunity. Busi- 
ness isn't too bad in the capital, so 
why 

When the newspaper strike hit 
Seattle in 1945, broadcast advertising 
business was lush — there were wait- 
ing lists on several of the stations in 
town. Thus it became a problem of 
public service, rather than a matter of 
commercial time on the air. And 
Seattle's stations did a top job. KOMO 
carried a classified section on a stag- 
gered a.m. and p.m. schedule, with 
ads for free, if they justified it — lost, 
found, sell, buy, etc. Fleetwood Lawton, 
network newscaster, was replaced with 
a local news program. Church and 
school notices were given the right of 
way. Time was also cleared for com- 
mercials for theaters. It was, to repeat, 
time sold on a "service" basis, rather 
than a commercial basis. 

KOL carried an obit column. Its 
local newscasts were increased also, but 
it was the who-died-yesterday news 
that received the play. 

KIRO had to drop all its sustaining 
programs. It sold the time to local re- 
tailers. It's Swap 'n Shop Department, 
which started during the strike, ran for 
two years afterwards to good audi- 
ences. It found that a good part of the 
local-retail business that came to the 
station during the strike stuck with it. 
if not in as great a quantity, 
afterwards. 

KJR added some local newscasts and 
double-spotted commercials to make 
room for all who wanted to use the air. 
As a result of a previous newspaper 
strike in 1936. Bon Marche, an import- 
ant department store, had come to 
radio and continued right along. It 
caried as many as seven newscasts a 
dav on WJR, had a heavy schedule on 
KOOM up to recently. Bon Marche is 
now trying TV. 

The independent stations in Seattle 
practically came of age during the 
strike. There was business for all. and 
they proved they had listeners. 

The big problem presented to adver- 
tisers by newspaper strikes is that they 
have to use broadcast advertising at 
once to replace newspaper advertising. 
They have neither the time nor the 
facilities to change over to radio think- 
ing overnight. Even when strikes, like 
Seattle's, run for months, the day-to- 
day problems are paramount - - the 
intelligent use of the medium is still a 
great big question-mark. * * * 




He had just checked 
into his hotel room when the phone 
rang . . . sales manager calling 
from New York. "Just decided 
to run a radio schedule in your 
market. What station do you rec- 
ommend?" 

"Had to think fast," says the 
salesman. "Didn't have time to 
check Hoopers, coverage and all 
that. So I told 'em, 'Give Me 
KDYL.' I knew I couldn't go 
wrong on that." 

Of course we're pleased he 
thought of KDYL first — but then, 
practically everybody does in the 
Salt Lake market. 

And with television success 
stories we have to show, they're 
thinking first of KDYL-TV too! 



National 
Repreientative: 
John Blair & Co. 




ask 

John Blair & Co. 

about the 

Hots & Martin 

STATIONS 

IN 

RICHMOND 



HI! IN. 
II I'll II 
WT11I 



AM 



FM 



TV 



First Stations of Virginia 



4 JULY 1949 



59 



(We're ww r 
) ABC! 




BC 



TELL! SELL! 



The WLOS Market 

Whose Busy Center Is 

a's Neville 



HOUNTAm MIKf " 



and whose reach embraces 
over a million folk in 25 
North Carolina-South Caro 
Una -Tennessee counties. 



Retail Sales: $606,991,000 

Primary and Secondary Listening Areas 
(Sales Management Estimate for 1948) 

Radio Homes bmb: 178,410 

Contact Toy/or-Borroff lor Full Market Facl$ 




5,000 Watts Day— 1.000 Night— 1380 Kc 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



BMI 



SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 

Networks .... 23 

AM 1,962 

FM 408 

TV 68 

Short-Wave . . 4 

Canada 1 50 

TOTAL BMI 
LICENSEES.. 2,61 5 s 

You are assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

* As of June 27, 1949 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



THE BIG PLUS 

{Continued from page 47) 

the setting the following night. If the 
setting was the same the radio set 
was marked down as not being used. 
This may have shortchanged radio, 
since it's conceivable that the occupant 
of the room might have wanted to 
listen to the same station that the 
previous occupant enjoyed. 

Uncounted millions listen to radio 
daily. As the summer reaches its 
peak, these uncounted millions increase 
due to vacations and summer bunga- 
lows. Nevertheless, the uncounted sum- 
mer listening is only a small part of 
radio's shortchanging of itself as an 
advertising medium. At work, at meals, 
relaxing away from home, or on wheels, 
America listens with no Hooper, Niel- 
sen, Pulse, or other survey to check its 
dialing. 

It's time now to count broadcast ad- 
vertising's bonus audience. * * « 



PER-INQUIRY ADVERTISING 

(Continued from page 25) 

There's a relationship between broad- 
caster and listener that doesn't exist 
between publisher and reader. 

Broadcast advertising can be a di- 
rect selling medium. Years ago, the 
networks and great stations decided to 
keep radio out of the nickle-and-dime 
advertising field and concentrate on 
selling with a broad stroke. They for- 
got that all sales are local. They know 
it now and there's no lack of realiza- 
tion of radio's selling impact. This 
doesn't mean direct-mail selling im- 
pact. There are ever so many areas in 
which direct-mail selling just shouldn't 
be and isn't a factor. It doesn't make 
sense for stations to by-pass the local 
retailer. When a broadcaster stresses 
direct mail, he at the same time infer- 
entially sells the retailer short. The 
most successful stations, like WLW. 
Cincinnati, stress the importance of the 
local retailer. What's true of this Cros- 
ley operation is true of most outstand- 
ing broadcasters. 

It's quite different when the station 
covers a broad expanse where listeners 
are far removed from population cent- 
ers and are devout direct-mail buyers 
— the Sears and Montgomery Ward 
country. Then stations like WNAX 
I Yankton, S.D.), WLS (Chicago), and 
a host of others serving rural America 
know they do not offend retailers for 



there aren't retailers at every cross- 
road — even today. Direct mail at sta- 
tions like WNAX is like blood in a 
human body. When it ebbs, station 
executives worry. When it hits the 
normal flow, then there are smiles at 
the station with the Big Aggie tower. 
There has been a great increase of 
firms trying to crash the per-inquirv 
field of late. Several devices are slick 
and several "insult" station manage- 
ments. One of the slick devices is to 
record a program with the PI offers 
in the show — and then suggest to sta- 
tions that they run the program at 
Vz to y>> the national rate. The op- 
erator further suggests that the pro- 
gram be sold to a local sponsor so 
that the station will get its full rate for 
time. A list of prospects for the pro- 
gram is sent with the offer — the pro- 
spects being firms with products that 
do not conflict with the PI offers in- 
cluded on the disk. The same firm 
also suggests that if the station doesn't 
like this idea, it can use "live" con- 
tinuity to sell the products on a 
straight PI basis. 



WE 
DON'T 

DRIFT 
INTO 
SNOW (Ky.)! 

Area that >t we ™ „ to pr.cH- 
BMB A-**"*, » °rf tbi. big 
e,Hy ever? "" " 
„,„ important are.. 

„„ ahine. our great 
Sleet, r»» or abM * jm . 

"-"""'.C «, oiber aeeuoo 

have to u«= " -ni-now? 
^ help dig you out no 




60 



SPONSOR 



Another slick device is that prac- 
ticed hy a number of magazines that 
record top-drawer material from their 
issues and offer the transcription free 
or at a nominal cost. In some cases 
local stores that carry the products 
advertised in the magazine are sug- 
gested as sponsors, and stations fre- 
quently have been able to sell the disk 
to local retailers. Up to this point 
there's no per-inquiry slant to the pro- 
gram. If the promotions stopped there, 
and most do, then everything would be 
satisfactory. The Pl'ing starts when the 
circulation manager of the magazine 
realizes that the programs are building 
up good will for him. and he decides to 
do something about it. A typical ex- 
ample is the case of Parents' Magazine, 
which sends Parents' Radio Forums to 
stations. Last December it invited sta- 
tions using the Forum to air offers of 
"Seven issues for $1.00," with the sta- 
tions retaining $.50 of each subscrip- 
tion received. When the NAB called 
the attention of Parents' Magazine cir- 
culation manager to its violation of the 
industry's code of ethics, he confessed 
that he did not know that he had vio- 
lated "the ethical standards of the radio 
industry." 

Some programs tied up with national 
publications are excellent shows and 
highly salable. Typical is Calling All 
Girls, for which the Harry Goodman 
office won an award for top-drawer 
promotion from the College of the 
City of New York. There's no Pl'ing 
to these programs, both the producer 
and the publication working together 
to create a top audience-appeal pro- 
gram which is made better because it 
carries the name of a national maga- 
zine and is promoted through the pub- 
lication. 

Broadcasting is a most effective ad- 
vertising medium. A good advertising 
medium must sell products at a low 
enough cost per sale to justify a manu- 
facturer's using radio. It's this ap- 
proach that PI deals of all kinds use. 
What is forgotten is that it forces radio 
to produce at the very moment the 
advertising is aired. It forces the com- 
mercial to use the "hurry, hurry, 
HURRY" technique. It forces radio to 
deliver its audience for milking at 
regular intervals, until it's completely 
milked and disgusted with broadcast- 
ing. Using the air to make a pressure 
sale, rather than the reasoned sale, 
hurts both the stations and the regular 
merchants and manufacturers using 
the medium. 

Typical of these sales are the piano- 



playing courses sold throughout the 
U. S. via the air. The salesman who 
sits down to the piano and then asks 
the audience, "wouldn't you like to 
play as I do?", naturally is a potent 
lure. The number of courses returned 
for refund is a good index to how 
listeners buy products for which they 
have no need. The number of fans 
who have sent in their money for a 
course or paid for it COD when the 
mailman called, and yet had no piano 
at home on which to study, is amazing. 

While few per-inquiry broadcast ad- 
vertising plans originate among the top 
hundred advertising agencies, there are 
important agencies in practically every 
big city in the U. S. that do make PI 
plans available. A favorite device is 
to buy time for PI sale product and 
then use the results on the stations 
from which time has been bought to 
influence other stations to gamble. For 
every PI offer that's turned over to 
the National Association of Broadcast- 
ers to investigate, there are ten that 
go on the air, without anybody being 
the wiser. Because a station may turn 
down a hundred per-inquiry deals and 
accept offer 101, the agencies and 
manufacturers keep trying. 

They can't get away with it in 
printed media. America's pitchmen 
and specialty salesmen are a diminish- 
ing brood. So the man who wants to do 
business on the other man's dollar has 
only broadcasting left. There are too 
many stations on the air. The com- 
petition of TV and the increasing 
buyers' market are softening some sta- 
tion managements — managements that 
perhaps shouldn't have been in the ad- 
vertising business to start. The result 
is more and more PI advertising creep- 
ing into broadcast schedules. 

It's a good plan to follow the rules 
of one outstanding advertising man- 
ager of a leading food corporation. If 
a station takes PI it doesn't get this 
firm's selective business. The station 
never knows why it doesn't get any- 
where with this national advertiser be- 
cause he never tells station representa- 
tives or even his own agency why he 
turns down certain stations. He ex- 
plains that it might be taken as coer- 
cion. 

"If they want per-inquiry business, 
they have a right to take it and I have j 
the right not to want to be on the 
same station with PI products. We 
don't advertise in the pulps, for similar 
reasons." 

To which the PI stations answer, I 
"We have to keep alive." + •* * 



VWMMVUVVMMWIWIMWMVUIMMA 



IT'S ONLY A FEW 



BILLION 



but 

WILL YOU GET 
YOUR SHARE? 



$2,995,897,000.00 

1948 Retail Sales* in WOW-LAND 
counties (BMB). 

All authorities agree this year's re- 
tail sales may be slightly lower . . . 
BUT . . . they also say . . 

26 fo 

28 fo 



of 19-49 retail sales will 
be made in the third 
quarter; 

of 1949 retail sales will 
be made in the fourth 
quarter. 



5o-o-o- 

Get YOUR share of the . . . 

22% Spent in food stores; 

40 °/o Spent in general mer- 
chandise stores — inc. ap- 
parel and furniture; 

38% Spent in other retail 
outlets. 

You WILL get Your share if 
you use the advertising facilities 
of Radio WOW— the ONLY 
single advertising medium that 
covers the vast territory within 
150 miles of Omaha in every 
direction. 

For availabilities see your John 
Blair man, or telephone Omaha, 
Webster 3400. 



* (Based on SALES MANAGEMENT'S fig- 
ures — May 10. Surrey of Buying Pouer — 
except for lou-a, ubich is based on state 
sales lax receipts.) 



RADIO 



OMAHA 

SOOO WATTS • 590 KC 
JOHN J. GILLIN, JR., PRESIDENT 
JOHN BLAIR, REPRESENTATIVE 



VVVVVXAAAAAAAAAA/WVWWWN* 



4 JULY 1949 



61 




Uncounted Millions 

Four months ago sponsor decided 
to check on the size of radio's unsur- 
veyed audience. As each week went 
by, the staff became more and more 
amazed at the millions who listened 
and went uncounted as part of the 
great air audience. 

It wasn't alone the great audience 
on wheels which ran up into the multi- 
millions every day, nor the enormous 
number of men and women who lis- 
tened as they ate. These were the 
obvious uncounted millions, but they 
were only part of the audience which 
wasn't being surveyed. There are the 
"at work" audience numbering into the 
multi-millions, the resort and vacation 
millions, and the millions who own 



portable receivers and use them at any 
time or place, even when they're at- 
tending a baseball game. 

If no one listened at home, the out- 
of-the-home broadcast advertising aud- 
ience would be the greatest advertising 
audience in the world — and yet it has 
never been sold — it has never been 
counted as part of what the sponsor 
buys when time is purchased. 

SPONSOR reports on The big plus, 
the great uncounted audience, on page 
19. It's the first report on the "great 
unmeasured." yet it is a logical part 
of sponsor's first audience revelation, 
Radio is getting bigger, 23 May, re- 
prints of which, in excess of 4.000. 
have been placed in the hands of key 
advertisers by agencies and stations. 

It's important that advertisers know 
what they're buying, when they buy 
time. If broadcasting wants to throw 
in millions of listeners as bonus audi- 
ence, it has the right — but sponsors 
should know it, so that they can mer- 
chandise the fact. 

If vou have read this editorial be- 
fore reading The big plus, mark this 
current article as "must" reading. 
Know what you're buying that can't 
be checked by Hooper, Nielsen, or 
Pulse. 

Summer Business Up 

Nothing happens of itself. The fact 
that business is better at a number of 
stations throughout the nation than 
it was at this time last year is no 
accident. Neither can we of sponsor 
take top billing for this increase. 



WCCO, Minneapolis, tried fighting the 
summer advertising slump last year 
and found that the fight paid off. This 
year, sponsor decided to carry the 
good word that business can be and 
should be good in the summertime to 
all who advertise or live by broad- 
casting. It published a Summer Sell- 
ing issue, without fanfare, without un- 
due promotion. The broadcasting in- 
dustry took the ball from there. Sta- 
tions all over the nation, agencies in 
both the U. S. and Canada, took the 
SPONSOR-uncovered facts to clients. 
Outlets like WOR. New York, started 
with SPONSOR facts and went further to 
prove that summer broadcast advertis- 
ing pays. 

It's too early for SPONSOR to make a 
report on summer broadcast advertis- 
ing that wasn't on the air last year. 
Even now. however, agencies report 
summer broadcast advertising five mil- 
lion dollars above 1948. 

Advertising moves people to buy 365 
days in a year. Its impact is neither 
less nor more in the summertime. 
What is different is where people listen, 
since in many thousands of cases 
they're not at home. 

Advertising is always important. It 
is extra-important now. since it must 
change a war-inspired habit of saving 
to a peace-desired habit of spending. 
To have stopped doing it this summer 
might have had disastrous results. 

Some minds haven't been changed, 
but enough have reversed the field to 
permit the nation to think construc- 
tivelv in terms of vear-round selling. 



Applause 



Hands Across The Border 

Broadcasting, U. S. and independent 
Canadian brand, is cut from the same 
pattern. It's all to the credit of the 
north of the border contingent that 
this is so. For years they have gone 
out of their way to have the men and 
women of U. S. who make their liv- 
ing from commercial radio feel at 
home in Canada, in or out of conven- 
tion time. 

Timebuyers, who want to know the 
facts of Canada's markets, are wel- 
comed as are transcription producers, 
music-rights representatives, research- 
ers, executives of NAB, and U. S. sta- 
tion managers. Once they visit Canada 
it's no problem to bring them back. 



In 1949, the U. S. contingent num- 
bered over 75. The NAB was well 
represented on the program from 
Judge Justin Miller to Lee Hart, who 
talked retail radio. The Broadcast 
Measurement Bureau, in the person of 
Ken Baker, talked BMB and the Bur- 
eau of Broadcast Measurement, which 
are one and indivisible. 

The Broadcast Music organization, 
that protects broadcasters in Canada 
as it does those in the U. S., had a 
sizable contingent, headed by Carl 
Haverlin. kept the Canadian broadcast- 
ters aware of BMI progress. To U. S. 
radio men it appeared as though it 
were another NAB convention. 

That's no accident because Canadi- 



ans attend the annual NAB meets with 
a regularity that makes Harry Sedg- 
wick, Jim Allard, George Chandler, to 
mention three, seem part and parcel 
of state conventions. 

The physical border between Canada 
and the U. S. is a line seldom patrolled 
and one that both Canadians and 
Americans cross without a second's 
thought. The air-waves cross the self- 
same border as though it weren't even 
a line on the map. Broadcasters know 
this and happily feel and act as one 
great fraternity. In their relations with 
each other they serve as perfect ex- 
amples of good international relations. 
Thev work together for the good of 
broadcasting. 



62 



SPONSOR 



KMBC 



HEART 




RM 



BEATS 



Special 
Trade Paper Edition 



JLnmn the Meant oA wm&Uecv 



Kansas City, 
Early Summer, 1949 



KFRM Again First In 1949 Survey 



KMBC AGAIN FIRST 

CHOICE OF KANSAS 

CITY LISTENERS 

Proof that KMBC con- 
tinues to be the most 
listened-to station in 
Greater Kansas City is 
contained in the latest 
Kansas City survey re- 
leased by Conlan & As- 
sociates. 

This general coinci- 
dental telephone survey 
was conducted in March 
to April, 1949, under 
the joint sponsorship of 
KC radio stations in- 
cluding KMBC. Over 
70,000 basic calls were 
made during the one 
week survey period be- 
tween the hours of 7:00 
a.m. and 11:00 p.m. 

Although KMBC 
rated first mornings, 
afternoons and eve- 
nings, most spectacular 
ratings were in the f ore- 
noons when KMBC 
topped its nearest com- 
petitor 34%. KMBC led 
its competition in this 
survey by an even 
greater margin than in 
a similar survey in No- 
vember, 1948. 

This new survey and 
other surveys giving de- 
tailed information on lis- 
tening habits through- 
out the Kansas City 
Trade Area — western 
Missouri, all of Kansas, 
and portions of adja- 
cent states — are avail- 
able to advertisers and 
agencies for their ex- 
amination and study. 
Simply call any KMBC 
or KFRM man, or any 
Free & Peters "Colonel". 



KFRM AREA 


SURVEYS 


SPRING — 1949 AND 




FALL— 1948 


12.8 

1 1.4 




Percentage of 


11.1 


Total Audience 


K 
F 
R 


~9.5 






13 _ 

6.7~ 


IT 


' Tr : 


5.8 


5.5 


M 











1st "2nd '3rd 4th 5th 



Kansas Farm Station Tops 1948 
Fall Rating 12%; Remains First 
Choice of Kansas Listeners Daytime 

Kansas radio listeners have again named KFRM as 
the most listened-to station, daytime, in the Sun- 
flower State. Moreover, the "Kansas Farm Station" 
leads its competition by 



LEGEND: 

The larger figures and 
solid lines indicate the 
March, 1949 Survey, and 
the stnall figures and dot- 
ted lines denote the Fall, 
1948 standing. The aster- 
isks denote Wichita sta- 
tions. 79 Kansas counties, 5 
Oklahoma counties and 4 
Nebraska counties were in- 
cluded in the March, 1949 
Survey. 73 Kansas, 5 Okla- 
homa, and 4 Nebraska coun- 
ties were included in the 
Fall, 1948 Survey. 

A total of 62,368 basic 
calls were made and 14,423 
listening homes surveyed in 
this new study. 

The Kansas, Oklahoma 
and Nebi-aska counties are 
dramatically pictured on 
the map below. All comities 
are within KFRM's 0.5 
mv/m contour. 



a greater margin even 
than before according to 
a March 1949 radio sur- 
vey made by Conlan & 
Associates. 

This coincidental sur- 
vey, one of the largest of 
its kind ever conducted, 
required over 62,000 tele- 
phone calls within KF- 
RM's half-millivolt con- 
tour. 

Essentially rural in na- 
ture, this Conlan Survey 
covered 79 counties in 
Kansas (all except the 
eastern-most and north- 
eastern Kansascounties), 
four in Nebraska and 
five in Oklahoma. Popu- 
lation of these 88 coun- 
ties is 1,038,146, not in- 
cluding the metropolitan 
centers of Hutchinson 
and Wichita, Kansas 




which were not surveyed. 

KFRM leads all broad- 
casters for the morning 
periods, and is first dur- 
ing the afternoon periods 
— first in listener prefer- 
ence for both time peri- 
ods, as well as for the 
entire survey. 

KFRM's programming 
is specifically designed 
for the area served, in- 
cluding up-to-the-minute 
daily livestock and grain 
markets direct from Kan- 
sas City, as well as other 
outstanding daily farm 
features. In addition, 
KFRM programming pre- 
sents special newscasts, 
women's programs, 
sports, special events, 
educational features, as 
well as top-flight enter- 
tainment programs fea- 
turing members of the 
KMBC-KFRM talent 
staff. This popularity in- 
dicates that listeners are 
getting the kind of pro- 
gram service they like 
and need from KFRM. 

KFRM joined with 
KMBC forms The KMBC- 
KFRM Team. Together, 
The Team provides ad- 
vertisers with the most 
complete, effective and 
economical coverage of 
the huge Kansas City 
Primary Trade Area! 



CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND - - - 



A Domm$0lM&ket 




mtmitmmmtMmm 



Consider sales potentials. 

of the nation. Sales Manage- 
ment's Survey of Metropoli- 
tan County Areas ranks 
Worcester County: 



V Population /, 



34th 



in numoer 
of Families 



41st 



tive Buying 
Income 



■ in Food 

\ Sales Household and 

\£? /}. Radio Sales 




c/< 






***.**"'** 



'Or . 



f 'n, 



KiApHJ- 9 * lZ°*« 



M G 






eft 



co w? «*: *w*s. 






^Mg s fQf ln ° n all h °s 





8JULY 1949 • $8.00 a Year ^ 




Fall Facts digest— key 
to (all advertising— p. 23 

J. Walter Thompson's Linnea Nelson still smiles at timebuying 

A N OZ 





B ll°i 

won ;;.'. 



Selective 
radio 



♦^\ 



■•PN, 




I E.T. 
1 directory 



FM 

status 

page 69 

Network 
status 

page 73 

Package 
programs 

page 7c 



V 


Network 
packages 

page 8! 


Hl 


Research 
status 




page 8! 



rar 



Ad agency 
TV dept's 

page 10 

TV film 



packages 

page IC 



Greatest Sho 
In Virginia 



«/ 



Throughout the length and breadth of Virginia 
there's nothing to equal Havens & Martin Stations. 

Top attraction is WMBG, with its scintillating 
combination of NBC and local highlights, 
high on the applause list since 1926. 

WTVR is Virginia's only television station. 
Where but WTVR can Virginia viewers turn for 
visual wonders gathered the world over by NBC-TV. 

Nor is FM forgotten. For WCOD serves its 
enthusiastic audience. 

Small wonder that the Havens & Martin trio are 
the First Stations of Virginia. Small wonder that 
they're preferred by national advertisers 
who know Virginia markets. 




WMBG am 
WTVR tv 
WCOD 



FM 



3%w4J ' < dwtfamA efty}tjw/nm 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 20, Va. 
John Blair & Company, National Representatives 
Affiliates of National Broadcasting Company 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



18 July 1949 



Pat Weaver really 
boss of NBC-TV 



Death of Regula- 
tion W spurs credit- 
furniture ads 



CBS sells 
Roi-Tan Joan Davis 



FLQG organiza- 
tional committee 
starts work 



Farm news at 
all time on air 



Folsom's 2nd in 
command now 
executive v. p. 



Pat Weaver, new NBC TV-vice president, is first network executive 
since Frank Mullen to have web's TV operations under his wing 
100%. Sales, engineering, and programing all report to Weaver who 
takes over 1 August. Weaver is bringing Fred Wile, Jr., along from 
Young & Rubicam to backstop him at web. Weaver appointment means 
that NBC-TV is virtually autonomous operation. 

-SR- 

End of credit restrictions (Regulation W) will spark increased com- 
petitive air-advertising by furniture credit houses and appliance 
dealers. Pre-war, more money was made frequently on charges for 
credit than on products themselves. Credit furniture firms have 
always found broadcasting tops among advertising media. Semi-annual 
Chicago furniture market last week reported better sales to 
merchants than in January but only in low-priced field. 

-SR- 

Ef fectiveness of network packaging of programs is seen in recent 
CBS sale of "Leave It to Joan" to Roi-Tan Cigars (American 
Tobacco) . Program features Joan Davis and bowed sustaining 4 July. 
It will fill first half hour of hiatus-vacated Lux Radio Theater 
time until 9 September when it goes commercial and shifts to 
Fridays 9-9:30 p.m. 

-SR- 

Foreign language broadcasting will not flounder from now on. Ralph 
iVeil (WOV) heads Foreign Language Quality Group committee which 
includes Frank Blair, Jr. (WSCR) , George Lasker (WBMS) , Samuel 
5ague (WSRS), and William Jory (WJLB) . Plans call for actively 
selling major foreign markets with facts and figures. 

-SR- 

In Northeast U.S. alone, there are 203 stations carrying farm 
market news, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture. This is 
almost 50% of stations (417) in 12 states canvassed by department. 
Peak farm news periods in area are 6:30-7 a.m., 12:15-12:45 p.m., 
and 6-6:15 p.m. Latter period changes in importance according to 
season of year. Farm news programing is at all time high. 

-SR- 

Position of Frank Folsom, as president of RCA, has been strength- 
ened by election of Joseph McConnell as executive vice president of 
the Radio Corporation. McConnell is a Folsom man. 



SPONSOR, Volume 3. No. 17. IS July 1949. Published biweekly bv SPONSOB Publications. Inc.. 32nd and Elm. Baltimore 1. Md. Advertising. Editorial. Circulation Offices 
40 W. 52 St.. N. Y. 19. N.Y. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. post office under Act 3 March 1879. 



18 JULY 1949 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS.. .SPONSOR 



4 networks to 

sell time for 

editorials 

Continental com- 
mercial radio men 
exchange ideas 



Zeisel places radio 

third in national 

advertising 



KXOK leads way 

in rate card 

changes 



National ratings 
under strong attack 



Sunkist growers 
fight frozen 
orange juice 



Elgin competition 
to buy Thanks- 
giving broadcast? 



Although it has only been announced by CBS, all 4 networks will 
shortly sell time for "opinion" now that the FCC has okayed 
editorial broadcasting. ABC has always been pro-opinion on air. 

-SR- 

Commercial broadcasters of Europe have joined hands to work to- 
gether to build acceptance for advertising-supported radio. Next 
meeting (1950) will be in Luxembourg with 1951 meeting scheduled 
for Madrid. Organization was inspired by Louis Merlin (Radio 
Luxembourg) and Bernard de Pias (French Advertising Federation) . 

-SR- 
Over-all figures of Dr. Hans Zeisel for Printers Ink show newspaper 
advertising first for 1948 ($1,749,600,000) with radio second 
($596,900,000) and magazines third ($512,700,000). Over-all tabula- 
tion obscures fact that national advertisers' use of media place 
magazines first ($512,054,200), newspapers second with 
$391,286,700, and radio third with $376,844,600. It's local adver- 
tising, a field that radio has neglected, that makes newspapers 
lead. 

-SR- 

Although there has been great agitation on part of agencies and 
advertisers to have stations "adjust" rate cards, first station to 
do so is KXOK, St. Louis. Station has split its former "A" time 
into "A' and "A-2" time. KXOK class C time has been broadened 
to include all time prior to 8 a.m. and after 10:30 p.m. 

-SR- 
Talk of scuttling national rating reports is tantamount to remov- 
ing only index advertisers have of broadcast effectiveness. 
More than ever broadcast advertising requires Hooperatings, Nielsen 
Ratings, and local ratings like Pulse. Advertising industry should 
fight for improved information from these sources and prevent 
attempts to throw only media research of it kind in scrap heap. 
Some of same interests that tried to axe Broadcast Measurement 
Bureau are now out to elimiate all research that pinpoints 
listening. 

-SR- 

Effectiveness of advertising of frozen orange juice is seen in 
slant new Sunkist orange advertising is taking. California's 
Sunkist group calls the orange itself the only "package" of fresh 
juice. What Sunkist master minds forget is that research recently 
revealed that users of frozen juice drink 100% more than squeezers, 
and it all comes from citrus fruit. 

-SR- 

Shift of Elgin's 1948 Thanksgiving and Christmas broadcasts 
CBS to NBC, with CBS selling its holiday broadcast to another 
sponsor and therefore splitting up home dialing has switched Elgin 
from its traditional sponsorship. While Elgin is spending the 
$200,000 in other advertising another watch manufacturer is said 
to be considering buying the traditional Thanksgiving broadcast 
for itself. It thinks the Santa hour a waste of time. Watch com- 
pany president says, "What have they got left to spend on 
December 25. " 






SPONSOR 



1 T/bey 6offi /ore MtMM-d mmca 



^- 




GREATER KANSAS 


CITY 


Morning 


Afternoon 


Evenin 


j (Sund 


jy throu 


gh Saturday) 






Sh 


are c 


• f Au 


dience 






Nov. 


March 


June 


Nov. 


April 






1947 


1948 


1948 


1948 


1949 


Station 


i KCMO 


18.3 


18.7 


19.3 


19.0 20.5 


Station 


A . . . 


11.5 


8.5 


9.4 


11.5 


11.4 


Station 


B . . . 


26.7 


27.4 


27.2 


27.8 


28.7 


Station 


C . . . 


31.0 


28.7 


21.7 


25.9 


23.9 



ST. JOSEPH, 


MISSOURI* 


Morning, Afternoon, Eveninc 


(Sunday through Saturday) 




Share of Audience 




Nov. June Nov. 




1947 1948 1948 


Station KCMO . . . 


. . . 17.4 16.6 19.4 




... 1.6 5.6 




... 9.6 6.8 9.9 




20.5 17.8 21.9 



One Does It In Mid-America 



l 



Station 
Rate Card 
Spot on the Dial 
Set of Call Letters 




National Representative: 
John E. Pearson Co. 



^m 



Source — Robert S. Conlan & .Associates 
*Kansas City stations only 

Since KCMO jumped to 50,000 watts power back in Sep- 
tember, 1947, our listenership has steadily increased. And — not 
only has KCMO's popularity risen with Greater Kansas City's 
700,000 "home-folks". . . but we are fast becoming one of near- 
by St. Joseph's most popular stations. There, too, 52 miles up 
the broad Missouri, you'll find KCMO up front with an ever 
increasing share of the radio listeners! 

Reasons? First, there's KCMO's keen ability to plan and 
produce programs keyed to Mid-America! And second, it's a 
supercharged signal that always comes in fine! A signal that 
blankets 213 rich counties inside KCMO's V2 mv. measured area. 
Smart timebuyers agree that for low, LOW cost per 1000 cover- 
age it's KCMO ... of Kansas City. 

KC M O 

and KCMO-FM 

KANSAS CITY,MISSOURI-94.9 Megacycles 

Basic ABC for Mi d - A m e r /' c a 



18 JULY 1949 




VOL.3 



uo.tf 



* SBW A9A9 



SPONSOR REPORTS 


1 


40 WEST 52ND 


4 


ON THE HILL 


10 


MR. SPONSOR: W. H. RTTER 


12 


NEW AND RENEW 


17 


P.S. 


20 


FALL FACTS DIGEST 


23 


FALL FORECAST 


25 


SPONSOR CHECKLIST 


28 


SELECTIVE RADIO: FALL 1949 


2? 


COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 


51 


TRANSCRIPTION AVAILABILITIES 


56 


FM BROADCASTING: FALL 1949 


69 


FM MAP 


71 


NETWORKS: FALL 1949 


73 


INDEPENDENT PACKAGES 


76 


NETWORK PACKAGES 


81 


RESEARCH: FALL 1949 


82 


MR. SPONSOR ASKS 


88 


4-NETWORK PROGRAM COMPARAGRAPH 91 


TELECASTING: FALL 1949 


97 


TV MAP 


101 


AD AGENCY TV DEPARTMENTS 


102 


TV FILM FACILITIES 


105 


TV LIVE PACKAGES 


107 


SPONSOR SPEAKS 


110 


APPLAUSE 


110 




Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Executive. Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 
Street, New York 19. N. Y. Telephone: Plaza 3-(1216. 
Chicago Office: 3150 N. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Fin- 
ancial 1556. Publication Offices: 32nd and Elm. Baltimore. 
Md. Subscriptions: United States $8 a year. Canada $H. 
Single copies 50c. Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1949 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC.' 

President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. 
Koehler. Associate Editors: Frank Bannister, Charles 
Sinclair, Dan Richman. Researcher: Stella Brauner. Edi- 
torial Assistant: Joseph Gould. Art Director: Howard 
Wechsler. Advertising Director: Lestei .1. Blumenthal Ad 
vertistng Department: M. n LeBlang; Beatrice Turner: 
i Illcago Manage] Jerry Glynn. Jr. Circulation Managei 
Muton Kaye. Circulation Department: Marcia Chinlt2 
Emily * "nt ill.). Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 

COVER PICTURE: Timebuying problems have tripled due 
to all of broadcast advertising's new facets, but Linnea 
Nelson (J, Waltei Thompson) can still smile over a dc-k 
piled high with everything from transcript!, ris to lilin 
shorts. 



400 West 52nd 



EYE-AND-SCISSOR-WORN 

SPONSOR is certainly to be congratu- 
lated for the many excellent articles on 
radio and television. Your publication 
is one of the most eye-and-scissor- 
vvorn that this agency subscribes to. 

The only complaint is a natural one; 
naturally, there just aren't enough clip- 
ping copies of sponsor for agency per 
sonnel, accounts, and friends. This is 
especially true of one particular article. 
How to Read a TV Rate Card. Is it 
at all possible to secure permission to 
reprint part of this article for distri- 
bution to some of our TV clients? If 
so. please advise. Naturally, proper 
credits would be given sponsor. 
Herbert True 
Radio, TV Director 
Carter Advertising Agen"y 
Kansas City, Mo. 



RAILWAY FAIR PUBLICITY? 

There seems to be a difference of 
opinion about the press or radio giv- 
ing much attention to the Railroad 
Fair. Life issue of July 11th ( pa<re 
104) starts off its story "Variety Re- 
called Its Surprise Success of 1948'' 
and front paged the story "Chicago 
Railroad Fair Tees 2nd Year to Boff 
Crowd.*' 

Paul Harvey in his radio program 
last Tuesday evening paid a glowing 
tribute, and the Chicago newspapers is- 
sued special editions. 

Now as to question of selling travel 
— last year in our exhibit while talking 
ing to two visitors, who had planned 
to drive west, I made train reservations 
for four people (two compartments), 
Chicago to New Orleans and return on 
our Panama Limited. The tickets were 
picked up the next morning. 

Come on out to Chicago and enjoy 
the "World's Greatest Show"' then you 
can retract your article. 

2Vi2 million in 1948 couldn't be 
wrong. 

A. W. Eckstein 
Advertising Agency 
Illinois Central Railroad 
Chicago 



"CRIME" MARCHES ON 

We at Schwerin Research read with 
great interest your 20 June article 
about the qualitative research done on 
[Please turn to page 6) 



Wh 



en 



You 



Use 



UJKDR 



in 



NASHVILLE 

Your 
Average 
Cost is just 

1.2 MILLS* 

Per 
Radio 
Home 

* Based on 101 half minute 
daytime rate and employing 
C. E. Hooper's Nashville Re- 
ports on WKDA's 1/10 millivolt 
area. 

uikdh 

MORE RADIO HOMES 

for your 

ADVERTISING DOLLAR 

Forjoe & Co., Inc. 
National Representative 



se 



I 



11 



e 




Greater Miami ( 



Net E. B.I. $511,190,000.. UP 13% 
Retail Sales $517,808,000.. UP 17% 
Population 410,000.. UP 23% 



•Sales Mgt. Survey, 1949 



76,400 new customers. ..$75 
million more spent this year 
than last (a grand total of more 
than $'/ 2 billion in retail sales) 
...Yes, all the figures are 
pointing up, Up, UP this year 
again in Greater Miami. 



«*#*•* 



And here are the top selling media 
in this bustling year-round market 



1 ■ The Miami Herald; 3rd in the nation in 
Total Advertising Linage for 1948 -- First 
paper in Florida to reach a Quarter-Million 
circulation -- Offering blanket coverage of 
Metropolitan Miami and the entire Gold 
Coast market. 



im Stye iflliatni Herald 







2 - WQAM, Miami's First Station, whose 
non-directional transmitter is located in the 
heart of Greater Miami's population center, 
and whose record Hooper indicates more 
listeners at lowest cost per listener in 
Greater Miami and its 15 adjacent counties. 



WQAM 



WQAM 



F M 



National Representatives 
STORY. BROOKS & FINLEY 
A. S. GRANT, Atlanta 



18 JULY 1949 



A. B. C. in Miami 

OWEN F.URIOGE. General Manager 



4MOS 



ANDY 



tf* 




t*C>* 



Gr OUc h ~ 



ffofa"' 



WW/ 



TO THE MAN WHO 
WANTS TO REACH THE 
GREATEST AUDIENCE 
IN THE RICH CENTRAL 
NEW YORK MARKET 

ft .a/wt'we#%& GONE j 

/F tfOtt DOM TACT FASTf 

This Fall, CBS presents, over WFBL, the greatest line-up 
of top-talent shows ever offered by any network. The 
newcomers shown above are just a part of this great 
listener-building schedule. If you have spots before your 
eyes, make sure they're WFBL spots . . . spots that are 
highest in Hooperatings and sales results. So get your 
order in early before the many choice spots — day 
and night — are all gone. 



We'll be glad to show you the list of 
availabilities. Just Call 

% Free & Peters, inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 





WFBL 



BASIC 

SINCE 

1927 



IN SYRACUSE . . . THE NO. 1 STATION 
WITH THE TOP SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
MORNING, AFTERNOON OR EVENING 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

Suspense. It is an excellent example 
of the growing importance of such re- 
search, and all of us in the field owe 
a real debt to the pioneering of Frank 
Stanton and Paul Lazarfeld, out of 
whose work the Program Analyzer ac- 
tivities grew. 

May I, however, correct one un- 
fortunate implication? The compari- 
sons made in the story would leave 
the casual reader with the idea that 
while Suspense's audience has grown 
by leaps and bounds, that of Crime 
Photographer has been standing still. 
To review the record: 

Suspense has been on the air for 
seven years. Crime Photographer is a 
much younger show, having been on 
for less than 3V2 years. In spite of 
this difference, a comparison of aver- 
age Hooper audience figures during 
the past two years shows a nip-and- 
tuck situation: 

1948 
Suspense 



Crime Photographer 



Rating 

Share 

Rating 

Share 



12.5 
38.6 
12.3 
40.0 



1949 
14.7 
38.8 
14.6 
40.0 



Five editions of Suspense, according 
to your article, have been tested in 
the past seven years. Twelve episodes 
of Crime Photographer have been 
tested by the Schwerin System in the 
course of one year. 

The Toni Company, sponsor of 
Crime Photographer through July of 
this year, as well as John Dietz. its 
producer, and Alonzo Deen Cole, its 
writer, has throughout been very for- 
ward-looking in applying research's 
findings to improvement of the pro- 
gram. That these efforts have paid off 
so rapidly attests to such healthiness 
of attitude and is reflected in steadily 
rising reaction scores. L'nder Toni s 
sponsorship to date, the average Hoop- 
er rank of Crime Photographer has 
been 18th, as compared to an average 
of 39th place under the previous spon- 
sor. 

Far from detracting from the im- 
port of your article, therefore. I feel 
this Crime Photographer story serves 
as still another example of how the 
intelligent use of qualitative research 
—whether over an extended seven- 
year period or in large doses within 
a shorter period — can contribute to a 
radio program's success. 

Horace S. Schwerin 
Schwerin Research Corp. 
New York * * * 

SPONSOR 




Reminder... for a CIGARETTE manufacturer: 




SPOT 
RADIO sells the 79,000,000 who smoke! 



OFFICES IN CHICAGO 
18 JULY 1949 



If you have a new cigarette to estab- 
lish, or an established brand that needs new 
sales . . . Spot Radio will do the job! Take your 
choice: hammer home 15 -second chain breaks 
all day long all over the country . . . sponsor 
the best programs in selected markets ... or 
combine both plans. Any way you work it you 
get radio's impact, right where you want it . . . 
selling cigarettes profitably for you! 

Your John Blair man knows how to 
put Spot Radio's selective power to work selling 
products costing 5 cents or 5 G's! He's ready 
now to apply his knowledge of radio, markets 
and merchandising to your own problems. 
Ask him today! 




JOHN 
BLAIR 



NEW YORK 



t COMPANY 

DETROIT ST. LOUIS 



ASK 



REPRESENTING 



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LEADING 



JOHN 



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BLAIR 



STATIONS 



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ARE YOU SELLING 'EM 

WHERE THEY LIVE 
ON THE PACIFIC COAST? 




IJon lee and only don lee can give you local 
network radio sales coverage on the Pacific Coast . . . because only Don Lee is designed especially 
for the Pacific Coast, where markets are big but mighty far apart. 

Think we're kidding? Take a look at a map; compare the Pacific Coast with the East Coast. The 
Pacific Coast is just as big, but there's also a big difference. The Pacific Coast is covered with moun- 
tains — high ones — many of them over 14,000 feet. Nearly every worthwhile market is surrounded 
by mountain ranges. 

Look how many stations the networks use to cover the East Coast. Well, long range broadcasting 
is even more unreliable on the West Coast. If you need complete coverage, complete local penetration 
of this big, rugged, 1,352-mile-long Pacific Coast, you need the network that has enough stations (45) to 



lewis allen weiss, Chairman of the Board • willet h. brown, President • ward d. ingrim, Vice-President in Charge of Sales 
1313 north VINE street, Hollywood 28, California • Represented Nationally by JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



Of 45 Major Pacific Coast Cities 



ONLY 10 

have stations 
of all 4 

networks 




3 

have Don Lee 
and 2 other 

network stations 




7 

have Don Lee 

and 1 other 

network station 




25 

have Don Lee 

and NO other 

network station 






P 



SPONSOR 




release your sales message locally from within the 45 important buying markets . . . that's Don Lee. 
To completely cover the Pacific Coast's 15/2 billion dollar sales markets — locally — buy the Pacific- 
Coast's own point of sale network: Don Lee . . . and sell the people where they live. 

Don Lee Stations on Parade: KWAL-WALLACE, IDAHO 

KWAL is one of three Don Lee stations used to give localized coverage of the wealthy northern section of Idaho, which 
would otherwise be virtually without network service. Mountain ranges and mineral deposits between this area and other 
remotely located network stations make "long-distance" reception unreliable. Shoshone, KWAL's home county, alone has 
a population of 19,100 and 1948 retail sales of $25,799,000 according to Sales Management's 1949 Survey of Buying 
Power. KWAL typifies Don Lee's policy of rendering localized service where your best Pacific Coast customers live — 
where they spend their money. 



The Nation's Greatest Regional Network 




iSiffiiffliTi, 



OH THE HILL 



Low-cost housing builders and 
modernization firms start expanding 

U. S. housing bill just passed commits the nation to a 
subsidized building program that will run until 1994. 
Immediate results will be more advertising for low-cost 
housing developments which the bill is set up to help. Just 
as important will be the modernization sections of the 
bill, which will help materially buildings firms which do 
most of their business in repair work. Expect firms that 
compete with Johns Manville to open up their advertising 
war chests. The U. S. will be spending $500,000,000 a 
year for the next six years through the Federal Housing 
and Home Finance Agency. 

FCC pressure starts 
easing on most fronts 

Pressure on the Federal Communications Commission by 
prospective licensees has tapered off to practically nothing. 
A number of firms would like TV permits ( freeze is still on) 
but the word has spread that it's possible to lose millions 
before getting into the black and this has cooled the ardor 
of even the most ambitious prospective TV station opera- 
tor. Result FCC can and does now operate with some 
degree of order and matters like theater-TV, color-TV and 
the hundreds of others services regulated by the commis- 
sion, are being handled with unpressured intelligence. 
Even the perennial hot potatoe, the clear channel fight, is 
being taken in FCC stride, despite plenty of needling from 
Senators who speak for the anti-clear channel forces. 

Drys making capital of 

U. S. 1948 alcholic spending 

Capital will be made, it's expected, of the figures recently 
announced on U. S. consumer expenditures for alcoholic 
beverages. In 1948, drinkers in the 48 states spent $8,800,- 
000,000 for distilled spirits, wine, and beer. This includes 
the tax on these products and service charges of places 
which serve liquor. Taxes, state and U. S., amounted to 
$3,000,000,000 of which the U. S. took $2,200,000,000. 
Despite the fact that these figures are down from 1947 
(14%), drys are making capital of the billions, and their 
philosophy is creeping into newscasts as well as newspaper 
reports on the so-called recession. 



Congress would like U. S. 
departments to get together 

Feeling in Congress is that it's time for some direction 
on national policy. Governmental department releases 
range all the way from being depression-slanted to car- 
in-every-garage optimism. Some congressional groups were 
prepared to attack radio commentators until fact that these 
newscasters were using U. S. releases as basis for reports 
was made clear to them. Only a man without a job is sure 
that '"business is bad."' 

1949 profits expected to 

be half of 1948 but still okay 

Indicative of profit trends are unofficial estimates bv 
Department of Commerce sources. Unless the unexpected 
happens (unexpected means war), net profits after divi- 
dends and taxes will be half of what they were in 1948. 
They will still be better than most years prior to 1946. 
Dividend payments, which the public likes, will be onlv 
$100,000,000 under 1948, $7,700,000,000 as against 
$7,800,000,000. This is good news and won't be heard 
or read much. Communications' net I that includes radio 
and TV) will be exactly that of 1948, which was at an 
all-time high. 

Attempts to pass mandatory 
fair-trade acts hurt fair-trading 

Fair-trade laws which make it possible for manufacturers 
to include prices in their national advertising aren't being 
helped by attempts, like that in the District of Columbia, 
to force products under mandatory fair-trade regulations. 
These regulations compel every product sold in a specific 
classification to be fair-trade priced. Fair-trade acts have 
tough sledding even after they're on the books. Florida's 
Supreme Court killed one such act and Florida had to 
pass another. California's legislature only recently killed 
an amendment which would have made its fair-trade 
statue impotent. It's one thing however to permit a manu- 
facturer to fair-trade his products and another to compel 
him to do it. Honest fair-traders don't want mandatory 
acts. 

Don't be too big, it 
isn't even half-safe 

It's dangerous to be too big. Thats the low-down from 
the anti-trust thinkers. U. S. verus DuPont. AT&T- Western 
Electric, and other suits in the making all point to On the 
Hill planning to break up inter-organization financing and 
"working agreements." RCA was on the agenda of the 
Justice Department, but NBC's loss of top programs crossed 
it off. 

Kenough's trade-mark bill raises 
plenty fuss among big corporation 

While most national advertisers would like tighter trade- 
mark regulations, Representative Gene Kenough's bill, 
which would give the U. S. "the power to regulate the use 
and ownership of trade-marks."' makes their hair stand 
straight up. Trade-mark owners want to be what the name 
implies, "owners," not permittees using trade-marks by 
governmental sanction and under governmental regulation. 



IC 



SPONSOR 



Has it ever happened to you! 



:::::: By aldrich 




L 




Now! The Presto Executive 

THE PLAYBACK OF BROADCAST STATION QUALITY 

NOTHING kills a client audition as quickly as a poor playback. 
Wows, wavers, turntable rumbles and harmonic distortion 
can make your best recording sound sour. 

Don't let a tired playback kill a sale for you. Get a PRESTO 
EXECUTIVE. It's the transcription turntable you will see in most 
broadcast stations, made by the world's largest producers of broad- 
cast station equipment. PRESTO executive is durable, time- 
tested, dependable. It's a complete transcription playing unit with 
16-inch turntable, high fidelity amplifier, 12-inch speaker, and 
lateral reproducer for both standard and microgroove recordings. 

No wires, cables or separate amplifier and speaker will confuse 
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phone, extra equipment.) 

For highest fidelity, record your programs on Presto Discs. 



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Mailing Address: P. O. Box 500, Hackensack, N. J. 

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WORLDS LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF I NSTANTAN EOUS SOU N D RECORDING EQUIPMENT AND DISCS 



City_ 



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18 JULY 1949 



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for profitable 

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WDEL 



WILMINGTON 

DEL. 



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LANCASTER 

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Represented by 

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A S S O 

New York 
San Francisco 



C I 



A T E S 

Chicago 
Los Angeles 



Cloir R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




Mr. Sponsor 



Ed irard L. Jiabru 

President 
Vick Chemical Company, New York, N. Y. 



Vicks VapoRub was concocted in 1885 in the back room of a 
Greensboro, N. C, drugstore. Like other famous nineteenth-century 
drugstore-originated products, such as Captain Emerson's Bromo- 
Seltzer and Dr. Bunting's Noxzema, VapoRub was first sold at 
retail only. By the time young Ed Mabry, Greensboro-born, gradu- 
ated from high school and took his first job with Vick, VapoRub was 
a leading seller to the cold-and-cough contingent. That was in 1916, 
when Mabry was 17. They tried to make an auditor of him. but 
the personal side of figures interested him more; so he got himself 
transferred to sales. He became president of the firm late last year. 

Mabry was more of a thinker than a talker; but when he spoke 
up there was plenty of meat in what he said. Early in his career he 
became interested in better ways to promote, and when Vicks Cough 
Drops and Va-tro-nol were launched he had a big share in their 
promotion. From early days the company was advertising-and- 
promotion-minded. and this aspect of selling fascinated Mabry. 
Vick experimented with network radio as early as 1928. They tried 
both daytime and nighttime shows, including news, drama, and 
musical. Nelson Eddy and Jeanette McDonald were among the famous 
names who sold Vick products. When Vick acquired Prince Matcha- 
belli. Inc., in 1941 Mabry gave loving attention to the famous 
Stradavari Orchestra program that sold perfume for several years. 

Matchabelli became a part of the Vick family in a move started 
some ten years ago to diversify the company's products. One of 
Mabry's chief responsibilities as executive assistant to the president 
was in the acquisition of subsidiaries. Among other firms acquired 
were Vitamins Plus, Inc., The Sofskin Co. I hand creams for women), 
Seaforth toiletries for men. Seaforth and Sofskin have been pro- 
moted via selective radio, and for several years the entire radio 
budget for Vick cold-and-cough products has been concentrated in a 
26-week winter-season schedule over approximately 100 stations. 
Announcements account for most of the effort, although 5-10-15- 
minute programs are used in markets where experience has shown 
they pay off. Believing that advertising is the life-sustaining element 
of Vick business. Mabry puts constant thought into ways of making 
it do more work for his products. 



12 



SPONSOR 




DuMont has only one "baby." 

With the Du Mont Television Network, it's television and 
nothing but television. When you talk television advertising 
to a DuMont representative you will talk 
only television — he has nothing else to sel!. 
And over the Du Mont Television Network, your message 

can reach 99% of all the television receivers in America. 



DUMONT TELEVISION NETWORK 




I 



515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 



COPYRIGHT 1949, ALLEN B. DU MONT LABORATORIES, INC. 



18 JULY 1949 



13 



...over 



five million 

people 

'■■■ B 

one station 



every wee 



t 



; 

: 

! 



including the nation's 

t mers. Six of the 
richest farmers. 

» „ California 
ten Southern Calit 

counties are among the 

■ „>« WP 25 in gross cask 
nat ,on s top 

,„. m income. Los /ms= 

,he heart of * I,A 

b the ..eoUhiest farm 
area, is " le 
county in ^ V. >• 




KNX 



Io5 ^rcge/es • 50,000 Faite 



COLUMBIA OWNED 
Represented by RADIO SALES 




Yes, more than 5,000 busy farmers and ranchmen left their important spring work to 
participate in the second Annual KVOO Calvacade of Greener Pastures held May 23 
through 27th! Cooperating with the KVOO Farm Department in sponsoring this great 
week of progress were: The Oklahoma Extension Service, The Arkansas Extension Serv- 
ice, Chambers of Commerce, Civic Clubs, and other agricultural agencies of the USD A. 
The purpose? To show some of the more than 3,000,000 acres of Southwestern pasture- 
land which is entered in the KVOO Greener Pastures Contest! Why? To promote and 
encourage the building of better pastures in the Southwest; to demonstrate methods and 
materials which produce better pastures; to provide a place for KVOO Farm Deparment 
advertisers to show their products; to better serve the Southwestern farmer and rancher 
. . . the prime purpose behind the KVOO Farm Department! 

"The best field day ever held in Arkansas!" so said Mr. Lipert S. Ellis, Dean of 
Agriculture at the University of Arkansas, and this was typical of other comments from 
agricultural leaders who attended this great cavalcade. 

Advertisers who have products of interest to farm and ranch folk will find the great 
Southwest a profitable place to sell, especially if they tell their story over KVOO, Okla- 
homa's Greatest Station — the station farm and ranch listeners always depend on for 
entertainment, information and news! 



mnnnHMnn 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



50,000 WATTS 



EDWARD PETRY AND CO., INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA, OKLA 



16 



SPONSOR 






'yyyyyyy 






18 JULY 1949 




\i>ic and rvnen 



THESE REPORTS APPEAR IN ALTERNATE ISSUES 




New National Selective Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Bank of America 

Bristol-Myers Co. 

Falstaff Brewing Corp. 

Federal Life & 
Casualty Co. 

G. & R. Laboratories 

General Mills, Inc. 

H. J. Heinz Co. 

Lever Bros. (Pepsodent 
Div.) 

Mason's Chicks, Inc. 
Messing Bakeries 



Timeplan service 

Ipana 

Falstaff Beer 

Insurance 

Floradent 
toothpaste 

Gold Medal 
Flour 

"57 Varieties" 

Ammoniated Pep- 
sodent powder 

Baby Chicks 
Bakery products 



Chas. R. Stuart 
(San Fran) 

Doherty, Clifford 
& Shenfield 

(N.Y.) 
D-F-S- (N.Y.) 



William Warren 

(N.Y.) 



direct 



D-F-S- (N.V.) 



Maxon (N.Y. & 
Detr.) 

J. Walter Thomp- 
son (Chi.) 

Metropolitan 

(N.Y.) 

Blain-Thompson 

(N.Y.) 



Indef* 
(Test campaign in Pac- 
ific mkts) 
5-10* 
(Limited expansion in 
South, S.W. mkts) 
Indef* 
(Adding mkts in South- 
west) 
1* 
(Fall test. May ex- 
pand later) 
Indef 
(Slow expansion plan- 
ned in N.W. mkts) 

Indef* 

(Spasmodic purchases 

in farm mkts) 

20-30* 

(Part of summer 

all-media drive) 

Indef* 
(National cam- 
paign planned) 

Indef* 

(Fall expansion 

planned 

4-5* 

(May expand in 

Eastern mkts) 



Time signals; early Jul; 13wks 
K.t. spots, breaks Jun-Jul; 13 wks 



E.t. spots, breaks; var dates in 
Jul; 13 wks 

Partic, spots; about Sep 1; 13 wks 



Live spots to introjuce new prod- 
uct; early Jul; 13wks 

Farm-appeal prgms; thru Jul; 13 
wks 

E.t. spots; Jul 18; 6 wks 



Var e.t. spots, breaks, etc; Jul- 
Aug; 6-13 wks 

Spots in farm-appeal prgms, breaks; 
early fall; 13 wks 

Partic, breaks; Jul-Aug; 13 wks 



"Station list set at present, although more man be added later. 
I Fifty-two weeks generally means a lH-week contract with options for 
any 18-week period) 




S successive renewals. It's subject to cancellation at the end of 




New and Renewed Television (Network and Selective) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Alliance Mfr. Co 
American Television Co 
American Tobacco Co 
(Lucky Strike) 



Benrus Watch Co 
Borden Co. 
Bowman Gum Co 
Bowery Savings Bank 
Brown & Williamson 

Tobacco Corp (Kools) 
Lorraine Burton Foods 
Carter Products, Inc 

(Arrid) 
Chevrolet Dealers 
Cushman Bakeries, Inc 
Eastern Wine Corp 

(Chateau Martin) 
Fedders Quigan Co 

(Air Conditioning 

Equipment) 
Hill Shoe Co 
Kendall Mfr. Co 

Levi-Strauss Co 
McKesson & Robbins, Ii 
Philip Morris & Co 



Foster-Davies 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Turner 


WNBQ, Chi. 


N. W. Ayer 


WNBT, Chi. 




WNBQ, Chi. 




WPTZ, Phila. 




KTLA, L. A. 


J. D. Tarcher 


WNBT, Chi. 


Young & Rubicam 


WPTZ, Phila. 


Franklin Bruck 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Wilson-Bird 


WCBS-TV, N. Y. 


Ted Bates 


KTLA, L. A. 




WABD, N. Y. 


McNeil & McCleary 


KNBH, H'wood 


Sullivan, Stauffer, 


WCBS-TV, N. Y. 


Colwell & Bayles 


WABD, N. Y. 


Campbell-Ewald 


WABD, N. Y. 


Samuel Croot 


WABD, N. Y. 


Feldman 


WABD. N. Y. 


BBD&O 


WCBS-TV, N. Y 


Schank 


WABD, N. Y. 


Kastor, Farrell, 


WBZ-TV, Bost. 


Chesley & Clifford 




Honig-Cooper 


WCBS-TV, N. Y 


Benton & Bowles 


KTLA, L. A. 


Biow 


WCBS-TV. N. Y 



Film spots; July 1; 14 wks (n) 
Film spots; June 15; 13 wks (n) 
Film spots; June 30; 13 wks (r) 



Film annemts; June 20; 12 wks (n) 
Film spots; June 1; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; June 15; 52 wks (n) 
Films spots; June 15; 13 wks (n) 
Slides; July 4; 52 wks (n) 

Film annemts; June 20; 13 wks (n) 
Film annemts; July 16; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; July 1; 13 wks (r) 
Film spots; July 5; 52 wks (n) 
Slides; June 29; 39 wks (n) 

Film spots; July 15; 5 wks (n) 

Film spots; Aug 5; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; June 15; 13 wks (r) 

Film annemts; July 6; 12 wks (n) 
Film annemts; May 28; 12 wks (n) 

Ruthie On The Telephone; M-F (except Wed) 7:55-8:00 pm; 
Aug 7; 52 wks (n) 




• in next issue: New and Renewed on Networks, Sponsor Personnel Changes. 
National itroadcast Sales Executive Changes. New Agency Appointments 



New and Renewed Television (Continued) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start duration 



Peter Paul, Inr 

i Mounds) 
K. .1. Reynolds Tobacco Co 

(Camels) 
Ronsdn Art Metal Works 
Jacob Kuppert Brewery 

(Beer) 
t . S. Ac mj & Air Force 

Recruiting 
Waring Products Corp 



Platt-Forbes 


WPTZ, Phila. 






WAnn, n. v. 


William 


Fst> 


KTLA. H'wood 


Cecil & 


Presbrey 


WPTZ, Phila. 


Biow 




WABD, N. Y. 


Gardner 




WCBS-TV. N. Y 


Grey 




WABD, IS. 1 



Film spots; June 311; 13 wks (r) 

Film spots; July II; 2fi uks <n> 

Film spots; June HI; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots; July I; 26 wks hi 

Film spots; July 13; 13 wks (n) 

Red Barber Club House; Sat 6:30-645 pm; July 2; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; July 2.">; 6 wks I ll I 



Adveriscng Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



L. E. Ahlswede 
Richard Ash 
G. N. Beecher Jr 
Byron A. Bonnheim 

Bob Bright 

J. L. Brotherton 

George I. Chatfield 
W. R. T. Cory 
Anthony C. De Pierro 
Herschel Deutsch 
Milton Douglas 
Chester W. Dudley Jr 
Hutchinson K. Fairman 

James H. Frankenberry 
Fred F^reeland 
Budd Getschal 
Gerald H. Gould 
Henry H. Harjes 
Fran Harris 
Lou Holzer 
Fred M. Jordan 
Eric T. Lifner 
William J. McLaughlin 

Everard W. Meade 
Frederick A. Mitchell 

Thomas M. Mullins 
Howard J. Murfin 
Maurice V. Odquist 
John K. Ottley Jr 
Frank B. Patterson 
Doris A. Pilat 
Murray Platte 
John H. Porter 
Elliot R. Rose 
Arthur Ruhicam 
Victor Seydel 
Samuel Sheplow 
Frederick B. Sherman 
Bert K. Silverman 
Athol Stewart 
George Vonderlin 
Kenneth Warden 
Robert B. Wesley 
Bob Williams 
David P. Williams 
Sidney B. Wolfe 
Jeff York 
Iz /am 



Reincke, Meyer & Finn, Chi., acct exec 
Blaine Thompson, N.Y., gen mgr 



Bob Blight Productions, N.Y., head 
PictSweet Foods, Mt. Vernon Wash., adv 
mgr 

Harry E. Foster, Toronto Canada, act exec 
Buchanan, N.Y., media dir 
Small & Seiffer, N.Y., vp 
DuMont, N.Y.i producer, dir 
Benson & Benson, N.Y., vp 
Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, N. N .. 
acct exec 

WBKB, Chi., program coordinator 
Stuart Bart & Getschal, N.Y., vp 
Rossum & Stanley, N.Y., vp, acct exec 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, (hi., TV dir 
Lockwood-Shackelford, L. A., radio dir 

Walt Disney Productions, H'wood., adv mgr 
Hamilton Copper & Brass Works Inc, Hamil- 
ton O., adv, sis prom mgr 
Young & Rubicam, N.Y., vp, radio dept mgr 
Marathon Corp, Menasha Wis., marketing 

research, sis analysis head 
Irwin Vladimir, N.Y., asst to pres 

Newell Emmett, N.Y., mdsg dir, acct exec 
Atlanta Journal, Atlanta Ga., adv dir 



Ralph H. Jones, Cinci. 
Berk T. Silverman, Wash., head 
McConnell, Eastman, Montreal 
BBD&O, Detroit 

Atlas Film Corp, Oak Park 111., pres 
Hamel Food Inc, Dallas, adv dir 
Erwin, Wasey, L. A., acct exec 
I. T. Cohen, Wash. 
KLAC, L. A., act exec 



pres 
acct exec 



Fuller & Smith & Ross, Chi., acct exec 

Getschal & Richard (new), N.Y., vp 

Kenyon & Kckhardt, N.Y., acct exec 

Weiss & Geller, Chi., acct exec, Elgin American div, 

Illinois Watch Case Co 
Emil Mogul, N.Y., radio, TV dir 
Brisacher, Wheeler, S. F., acct exec 

Compton, N.Y., vp 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N.Y., acct exec 

Geyer, Newell & Ganger, N.Y., media dir 

Dorland, N.Y., vp 

Stanton B. Fisher, N.Y., TV dept mgr 

Compton, N.Y., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Jackson, N.Y., arct exec 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, (hi., TV dir 
Getschal & Richard (new), N.Y 
Norman D. Waters, N.Y., 
Doremus, N.Y., acct exec 
Same, H'wood., TV dir 
Same, vp in chge radio 
Erwin, Wasey, L. A., vp 
Erwin, Wasey, L. A., acct exec 
Venable-Brown, Cinci., acct exec 

Same, radio dept dir 

Needham, Louis & Brorby, Chi., acct exec 

Atherton, L. A., prodn mgr, acct exec 

Doremus, N.Y., vp 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, N.Y., acct exec 

Liller, Neal & Battle, Atlanta Ga. 

J. M. Lenz, H'wood., acct exec 

Artwil, N.Y., acct exec 

Norman D. Waters, N.Y., media dir 

Buchanan, N.Y., acct exec 

David Malkiel, Boston, acct exec 

Morey, Humm & Johnstone, N.Y., acct exec 

Anderson, Davis, & Platte, N.Y., radio, TV head 

Luckoff, Wayhurn & Frankel, Detroit, radio, TV head 

Grey, N.Y., acct exec 

Henry J. Kaufman, Wash., acct exec 

Walsh, Montreal, radio dir 

Same, Chi., acct exec 

White, Berk & Barnes, N.V., vp 

Turner, Chi., acct exec 

Ross Sawyer, L. A., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Same, TV dir 

Hunter, L. A., acct exec 

H. W. Hauptman, N.Y., acct exec 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



WFMY-TV, Greensboro N. C. 
WHTf, Holland Mich. 
WLAM, Lewiston-Auburn Me. 
WNEL, San Juan P. R. 



ABC, CBS, DuMont, 

Independent 

ABC 

NBC 



NBC 



Harrington, Righter & Parsons 

W. S. Grant 

Fvere tt-Mr Kinney 

Ashrroft & Banninger, for N. Y, 



WHO LISTENERS 

SEND 260,000 PARCELS 



TO EUROPE! 




i 



n December, 1945, WHO began telling 
its listeners about the great need for 
clothes, medicine and food in Europe — 
told its listeners that by writing to WHO, 
they could get the actual names of needy 
families in Europe to whom relief pack- 
ages could be sent. The results for the 
first four months were startling: Listeners 
in 39 states sent 22,500 packages to fam- 
ilies in Norway, Holland and France! 

Elated, WHO decided to continue the 
appeals for as long as the need existed, 
though a rapidly-diminishing response 
was anticipated. Time proved otherwise. 
Instead of losing interest in the following 
three years, WHO listeners stepped up 
their rate of giving — have now sent more 
than 260,000 parcels to eight European 
countries! 

What sort of star-studded program 
does WHO use for this European 



Relief Project? It's "The Bill- 
board," a public-service program 
conducted by M. L. Nelsen, our 
News Department Editor, and 
heard three nights a week from 
10:30 to 10:45! 

Here is magnificent proof of 
WHO's listener-acceptance. 

It stands to reason that advertisers, too, 
benefit from all the things that make WHO 
the favorite staion in Iowa Plus. Get the 
proof — write for your copy of the 1948 
Iowa Radio Audience Survev. 

WIHI® 

*/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines • . • 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
/*>v P. A. Lovet, Resident Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 




18 JULY 1949 



19 



New ilerelopmeuls on >/*0 Y>0#{ stories 



p.s. 



See: "Squeezing the most out of Bing" 

IsSlie: 4 July 1949 

Subject: Sponsor shift on WCBS. New York 



The fart that the 10:15-10:30 daytime Godfrey wasn't 
heard during the first few weeks of his sponsorship by 
Spray-a-Wave was not due to any Crosby-Godfrey or 
Minute Maid-Spray-a-Wave contretemps. It was just 
a case of a third sponsor who couldn't be moved for 
three weeks, due to contractural obligations. Crosby is 
now heard in New York at 10 a.m. and Godfrey starts 
at 10:15. Thus the Crosby-Godfrey back-to-back sched- 
uling hasn't changed and everyone's happy, except per- 
haps the sponsor who isn't on the WCBS air any more. 
Everything is okay between CBS and Minute Maid. The 
Columbia friendship recently brought Minute Maid from 
WHDH (Boston) to the CBS owned-and-operated outlet 
in the Hub, WEEI. 



p.s. 



See: "Per-inquiry advertising" 

IsSUe: 4 July 1949 

Subject: A few misplaced credits 



While Harry Goodman has won awards for his weather 
jingles and other programs, it is the Frederic Ziv tran- 
scription organization that represents Calling All Girls 
and that won the CCNY accolade for promoting this 
transcribed program. 



No estimate of the business placed on a per-inquiry 
basis was made in the 4 July report. This omission was 
deliberate. There are no accurate figures available. Any 
estimate is crystal-hailing. 



p.s. 



See: "The national rating problem" 

ISSUe: 6 June 1949 

Subject: Cost-per-thousand figures, etc. 



Although it has been generally understood that Nielsen's 
compuation of his cost-per-thousand figures I which he 
reports on the inverse basis of "homes reached per dol- 
lar" I was based upon gross-time figures, they have in- 
stead been figured on "a series of discounts which develop 
a figure very close to the net amount actually paid by 
the sponsor." 

Also, most recent Nielsen figures are based upon the 
newlv BMB-reported 39.275.000 radio homes, rather than 
the old 37.623.000 figure. 

It is also Nielsen's claim that his unusable tapes which 
average "less than 109* of the total tapes.'" create pro- 
gram-rating differences of only a fraction of 5%, which 
it's claimed is "well within the margin of statistical 
error inherent in all sampling operations." 

It is also reported that with the new mailable Audi- 
meter tapes, Nielsens advance ratings will not be at 
variance with his final ratings. 

The expected violent opposition to Hoopers network- 
TV ratings has thus far not materialized. There is nothing 
to prove Hoopers figures wrong and he s gambling that 
there wont be. 




20 



SPONSOR 



/ 



! 



a Re f l** 1 

fi W ** • VG N ba* \ eNV chemic 

H °AtcV-^ i0etY W7oUbe^ 



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rtvo stU l., t b^est 



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sig 

sbiPP l0 r g : 

Texas U 
listener; 



° f t U - aCb r^Beau-o^ 



nearby 
d GaW« 
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B MBsaY^ Ho0? 

^ {ormuVa tot ^ 
petry °° W 



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City » . a Urt0fll iag C 



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,50 WV0 CYCV 'co^'\ 



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■ 



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^^H 



^ 



NORTH CAROLINA'S 

NUMBER 1 SALESMAN 



50,000 WATTS 680 KC 

NBC AFFILIATE 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

FREE & PETERS, INC 

NA TIONA L REPRESENT A TIVE 




SUBJECT 



Forecast 



Checklist 



Scope of selective 
radio 



Farm audience 

Out-of-home 
listening 



Block programing 



Availabilities 



DESCRIPTION 



Of the 31 industries checked and forecast by SPONSOR in this Fall Facts 
issue over half will be using advertising more aggressively in 1949-1950 than 
last year. Business is off in many of the fields and advertising will be price- 
conscious. 



SPONSOR'S Checklist, revised in this issue for the third time, is life-insurance 
for every broadcast advertiser. One peculiarity of the air is that the more 
you do with it the more it does for you. 



Every market is different. The sales and entertainment appeals of broadcast 
advertising frequently can do their best job when they're tailored to the 
individual market. 



The farmer has 10-15% less money to spend and asks more questions before he 
spends it. Rural America is still a great market. 



An important segment of the U.S.'s over 140,000,000 listen to radio away from 
their firesides. That's important to advertisers and data is being gathered on it. 



Back-to-back scheduling of same-appeal programs insures sponsors of reaching 
regular listening audiences. 

Station breaks and other choice announcement time will be available this Fall. 



PAGE 



25 



28 



29 



30 



32 



38 



41 



Continued on next page B 






*.mimUi 'ii. 



Fall Facts Digest: 1949 (Continued) 




SUBJECT 


DESCRIPTION 


PAGI 


Station 
representatives 


The national salesmen for stations have turned into national sales ambassadors 
for broadcast advertising. They're the good right arm for many an advertising 
manager too. 


42 


Independent 
stations 


The station that couldn't ach-eve a, network affiliation was a fringe outlet a few 
years ago. Now, in many cases, it leads the parade in its market. 


46 


Regional 
networks 


Highpowered FM stations help build regional networks. Sponsors are finding 
that intense coverage, blanketing a market, is ideally achieved by state-wide 
or area-wide chains. 


48 


Transcriptions 


Although the quaPty of recorded programs has been high during the past few 
years, it's even better this year. 


56-6! 
78 


vJjSjIa fm 


Frequency Modulation has suffered outrageous setbacks. Once again, it's on the 
way up. Transitradio and storecasting are helping it. 


69 


( v Network 


The names of the networks are the same but they're different as Fall 1949 
approaches. 


73 


Network 
packages 


One way the different chain picture is revealed is through the programs they 
are building for saie. 


81 


Contests and 
offers 


The "million dollar" contest has gone on its way. The new radio promotions 
are tied to charities, box tops, and proof-of-sale. 


80 


( Research 


Radio research still sets the media pace. 


82 


ii 

Rates 


"Mr. Sponsor Asks" has a few answers to the question of "cost-per-thousand" 
figures. 


88 


:, 

«4fJ| TV 


It's an advertising medium now. 


97 


Film 
facilities 


An industry of major size awaits the TV sponsor. 


98, 10! 


• 
Ad agency 

TV department 


While most agencies only have one man departments hundreds are ready to 
cope with sponsor problems. 


102 


TV programs 


Networks, stations, and independent packagers, are all building programs 
despite the fact that it costs great sums to audition a visual show. 


107 



for 



FALL FORECAST 



1 . food 



1. The food industy has general- 
ly adjusted its inventories and its 

sights so that it knows where it's going 
this Fall. Food sales continue at all 
time high with the U. S. and Canada 
eating better than they have in their 
entire histories. There will be no 
shortages despite the drought which 
has hit the Northeast and the farmers 
in this area. With Europe scheduled 
to take less foods from the Americas 
than in 1948 and 1947, food processors 
will find it necesasry to step up do- 
mestic consumption. Luxury products 
are not selling, and forecasts indicate 
that they will not sell this fall. Result 
is that lush products like canned fruit 
for cocktails are being price-revised in 
an effort to put them in the staple class. 
All food processors and marketers 
are adding to their budgets for promo- 
tion. Broadcast advertising will have 
more extensive campaigns from radios 
regulars. A number of food firms that 
haven't used the medium to any extent 
will also take to the air. Because of 
spotty distribution of most food prod- 
ucts, more selective broadcast adver- 
tising will be used than network, al- 
though network food business will also 
be up this fall. From a profit view 
point food processors will report lower 
incomes for this year with increased 
grosses. How low the profit-margin- 
per-dollar can go and still pay divi- 
dends is a debatable point. 

2. Cigarette smoking will con- 
tinue up this fall and winter. There 
is no indication of a reversal of the 
trend of the past few years. Most ciga- 
rette advertising is directed at the yet- 
to-start-smoking age group and the fe- 
male of the species. Only a small per- 
centage of smokers can be persuaded 
to change their favorite brands. It re- 
quires so much advertising to accom- 
plish brand switches that most copy 
appeals try to accomplish this only- 
while selling the new smoker. 

18 JULY 1949 



Cigar smoking continues on the de- 
cline, with pipe puffing maintaining an 
even keel but not increasing. An at- 
tempt will be made this fall to reverse 
the downward trend in cigar smoking 
with leading manufacturers spending 
more than in previous years to make 
the cigar socially acceptable. 

There is nothing startling scheduled 
in radio or TV for tobacco sponsors. 
Most programs and commercials will 
follow accepted formulas. Philip Mor- 
ris, as usual, is looking for something 
different, but hopes that Horace Heidt 
will continue to do okay. Old Gold 
still likes the Original Amateur Hour, 
with a switch in TV networks, but to- 
bacco on the air. with the possible ex- 
ception of Roi Tan's sponsorship of 
Joan Davis, will not be very different 
from the 1948-1949 season. 

3. Gasoline and oil are in over 
abundance. This follows the forecast 
of Sponsor in its 1948 Fall Facts 
issue. The only difference, as fall 1949 
approaches, it that it's generally con- 
ceded that this is so, while in 1948 
general predictions were for a con- 
tinued tightness in supply. Thus far 
there hasn't been any great rush of the 
oil companies to the air. Instead, the 
refiners have been thinking of new ap- 
proaches to the product itself. Con- 
ferences have been and are being held 
with motor manufacturers looking to- 
wards bringing out new gasolines with 
extra power and pickup. These gaso- 
lines are useless unless automobile en- 
gines are manufactured that can take 
advantage of the possibilities of the 
product. 

A number of brands that have not 
been too active in advertising will re- 
turn to the air this Fall. Budgets of 
several of the brand leaders are being 
increased as this issue of sponsor goes 
to press. Because television enables 
gasoline refiners to demonstrate claims, 
there's great interest in this medium. 



2. 


tobacco 


3. 


gasoline and oil 


4. 


beer 


5. 


soap 


6. 


beauty products 


7. 


automobiles 


8. 


pens and pencils 


9. 


drugs 


10. 


fuel 


11. 


department stores 


12. 


milk 


13. 


coffee 


14. 


flour 


15. 


baked products 


16. 


men's wear 


17. 


women's wear 


18. 


insurance and finance 


19. 


candy 


20. 


radio and TV sets 


21. 


home wares 


22. 


watches and jewelry 


23. 


farm machinery 


24. 


farm feed and seed 


25. 


home appliances 


26. 


building 


27. 


soft drinks 


28. 


books 


29. 


home furnishings 


30. 


auto accessories 


31. 


travel 



The radio regulars, Esso, Gulf, Stand- 
ard Oil of New Jersey, American, At- 
lantic, etc., have no intention of for- 
saking the aural medium — they'll be 
using both. 

There is no possibility of the U. S. 
consuming gasoline at the current rate 
of production, so some fields will have 
to be shut down and others operated 
on a partial-week basis. There'll be a 
real battle for that gasoline dollar this 
Fall and Winter. 

4. The beer industry will end 
1949 with a banner year. The strike 
in New York which shut down leading 



25 



brewers in that cty for weeks will hit 
the profits of these firms, but the rest 
of the nation will report good brewing. 
thank you. 

Beer is one of the leading sponsors 
on the air in dollar volume, although 
this is seldom noted because the money 
is not spent on network broadcasting 
but on a regional or selective basis. 
Some of the biggest special networks 
are assembled for sportcasts of brewers 
like Goebel. 

Brewers will continue to sponsor 
baseball, fights, and all other sports 
that permit beer sponsorship. They 
now agree that beer drinking is an all- 
year-round habit, and most of the big 
regional firms budget on a 12-month 
basis. 

There'll be no curtailment of beer 
advertising on or off the air. 



5. Two major shifts in advertis- 
ing emphasis may be noted this 
Fall in the soap field. P&G and 

Lever Brothers are expected to em- 
phasize their use of selective announce- 
ments with a far greater percentage 
of their advertising budget going into 
this form of radio than these two com- 
panies have set aside for this purpose 
in the past. At the same time, Colgate- 
Palmolive-JPeet is expected to use some 
daytime air on the networks. In the 
past C-P-P has spent most of its net- 
work radio advertising money for 
nighttime programs. 

Production in the soap field has now 
reached the stage that Lifebuoy can be 
half-priced for an "introductory" sale. 

The housewife who made her own 
during the war is being won back by 
the soap companies. The leading deter- 
gents are now controlled by the lead- 
ing soap manufacturers so that the soap 
firms no longer worry about a shift 
from standard soaps to detergents. The 
independent chemical firms that were 
expected to invade the home washing 
field haven't made much progress and 
are not expected to do so. 

While the death of Lord Leverhulme 
has raised some questions about who 
will control the Lever Brothers business 
in the Lnited States — and that has a 
bearing on the soap business in the 
U. S. — there is not apt to be any shake- 
ups within the next six months. After 
that - — ! 

6. Cosmetics and all beauty prod- 
ucts have been having a bad time 
this spring. Many of the firms have 
run out of consumer appeals to use in 



advertising and require new creative 
blood. I nlike Toni. which keeps re- 
versing the field and thus leading it, 
there is little being done to make mi- 
lady feel naked without a specific- 
brand of beauty aid. 

Buyers of cosmetics and other beaut) 
aids are price conscious at present, but 
the past has proved, as will the future, 
that price is no deterrent when the 
product is something that she must 
have to enhance her beauty. 

Beauty products, except Toni, have 
not used broadcast advertising to any 
degree during the past 12 months. 
Neither have they flocked to television, 
although the latter seems ideally suited 
to creating the urge to buy. Participa- 
tion in video fashion shows and an oc- 
casional one-minute announcement-type 
commercial is the extent of the beauty 
field's use of TV. 

One beauty firm will break the ice 
this fall and sponsor a program which 
will be heard on radio and seen on 
TV at the same time. If it goes — and 
the product is new and may start a 
trend — the advertising approach of the 
entire field will change. The success 
of Toni's use of broadcast advertising 
hasn't convinced most beauty product 
advertisers that broadcast, advertising 
is for them. Early cosmetic failures on 
the air still rankle the make-them- 
beautiful contingent. 

7. The automobile business has 
left the ranks of rackets and is now 

operating on a buyer's market basis. 
The $1,000 under the counter, the used- 
new car, the "must-extras." and all the 
other dodges which forced the public 
to pay as high as 50% more than the 
list-price for a new car, have departed. 
Automobile manufacturers' advertising 
is in full swing. Detroit loves tele- 
vision and most of the leading manu- 
facturers will have at least one TV pro- 
gram on the air this Fall. Most of them 
will also have a radio program on the 
air. despite statements of firms like 
Ford, that all its air dollars would go 
for the visual medium. 

By December 1949, there will be 
cars available for delivery on the floors 
of most dealers. That means hard- 
hitting selling and getting away from 
the institutional approach. 

8. The bottom dropped out of the 
pen and pencil business during 
1948-1949. With the bottom went 
most of the broadcast advertising of 
these firms. With the bottom also went 



the president of Eversharp. Martin 
Strauss. He was forced to resign by 
stockholders. Nevertheless, Eversharp 
is still on the air and expected to spend 
more money on its $64 question pro- 
gram than ever before. Eddie Cantor 
is taking over from Garry Moore short- 
ly. Its expected that the program for- 
mula will also change with Cantor, al- 
though the quiz device will contine. 
Eversharp hasn't suffered a gross-sales 
drop as big as some other firms, but 
its net loss has been greater, and that's 
why Strauss had to go. Eversharp's 
razor business has helped sustain the 
firm. Ballpoint pens at $.25 to $1 have 
hit all pen firms and it will be several 
years, it's expected, before the busi- 
ness rebounds. As most pen firms see 
the future, they must return to a holi- 
day and gift business, which the high- 
priced pens were for so many years. 
When the pen and pencil firms have 
something they can sell the public at 
a profit, they'll be back on the air. It 
doesn't look like it will be this Fall. 

9. While the leading drug firms 
hide their annual statements much 
better than the L . S. seems to hide its 
diplomatic secrets, business has settled 
to a pre-war level with many leading 
firms. Ammoniated toothpastes upset 
the mouth wash and standard tooth- 
paste business this Spring and will con- 
tinue to do it this Fall. Several mouth- 
washes will add the same ingredients 
that make the ammoniated products 
effective and thus offset the business 
drop they have suffered since the first 
of the year. Its been found that 
people using the new toothpowders 
and pastes still wash out their mouths 
afterwards and thus lose the benefits. 
An ammoniated mouthwash will find 
a market, despite the fact that it isn't 
needed, if America uses the powder or 
paste properly. 

Standard drug products have leveled 
off inventories and manufacturers will 
continue to sponsor the programs they 
have on the air. with the usual re- 
volving commercials. There is not ex- 
pected to be any upsurge, or drop, in 
drug broadcast advertising. There'll 
be the usual new products with test 
campaigns, etc. but nothing startling. 
The drug business is in good shape. 

10. Coal is a glut on the market 

and will continue to be for the next 12 
months. This will be so whether or not 
John L. Lewis calls a strike. Coals 
problem is that it is rapidly losing its 



26 



SPONSOR 



status as a low-priced fuel. Cost of 
mining has gone up and up and this 
cost must be passed on to the consumer. 
For a number of years there has been 
talk of an industry campaign to sell 
coal to the public, but nothing has 
come out of it. The new "dust-less" 
coal for stokers has garnered some ac- 
ceptance, but nothing really has hit 
the market since Blue coal. The 
Shadow. D. & H. Miners and a few 
other regional programs will continue 
to do a good selling job competitively. 
The big job — to sell coal itself — will 
continue undone. 

11. Department store business is 
sliding and there will be a number of 
mergers and a few failures this Fall. 
While upstairs business has declined, 
basement business has increased, for 
this is a price-conscious America. De- 
spite the fine \AB-Joske experiment, 
department store advertising depart- 
ments are still run by black-and-white 
advertising executives, and department 
stores generallv have not learned how 
to use broadcast advertising. TV has 
interested them more than the aural 
medium, but there hasn't been too 
much use of the visual medium, be- 
cause in most areas there is very little 
daytime video — and department stores 
feel that they should sell in daytime. 
( Same-day impact is important to 
these stores, or at least they think so). 

There will be less emphasis on de- 
partment store selling via radio on the 
part of the new NAB department, the 
Bureau of Broadcast Advertising. The 
new local-retail emphasis is to be 
placed on the smaller retailer who 
hasn't too many fixed notions about ad- 
vertising. 

Department business will continue to 
ease off. The stores will use more TV 
advertising and for the most part very 
little radio. 



12. Milk has over-priced itself out 
of the adult market in many areas 
of the country. It still continues to be 
a must for Junior and sister, but 
mother and dad generally think that 
its too expensive for them. The dairy 
interests thus have a two-fold problem. 
They must find ways of reducing the 
price of fluid milk, and re-educate 
adult America on the necessity of 
drinking it for goodness and healths 
sake. 

Dairy advertising budgets will be 
watched very carefully. State regula- 
tory bodies have been investigating the 



marketing costs of milk, and advertis- 
ing is one of these costs. 

Advertising for milk by-products, 
cheeses, etc., will expand this Fall. 
Warehouses have been filled to over- 
flowing with various cheeses and they 
must be emptied to permit new cheese 
to age. Cheese prices will be lower this 
Fall and "rare" cheeses will be avail- 
able. 



13. Coffee prices will be lower 
this Fall, and Coffee advertising will 
continue at a high level. No new na- 
tional coffee brands will be introduced 
and selling pressure on liquid and 
powdered coffee will be lessened. Many 
coffee merchandisers feel that the con- 
centrates will find their buying level 
this Fall and will stay there. Only the 
liquid coffees, which do not compete 
with a bean or ground coffee, will be 
pushed. 

14. Aggressive selling of flour will 
return to the air this Fall. The na- 
tion produces 50% more flour than it 
requires and with a lessened demand 
from Europe, it becomes a highly com- 
petitive matter as to who will sell the 
commercial as well as the home baker. 
All the important mills will use broad- 
cast advertising on or before 1 Oct- 
ober. 



15. "Buy It Baked" will be a sales 
rallying cry for the bakery in- 
dustry this Fall. National advertisers 
of products that bakers use will be 
asked to use this slogan, or one like it, 
in their air copy, and local-retail 
bakers will combine in many towns to 
sponsor campaigns to sell the idea that 
commercially baked bread and cake 
are better. Test compaigns have proved 
that these local campaigns increase 
bakery busines as much as 20 r < dur- 
ing the campaign. 

16. There will be little national 
advertising on the air or in maga- 
zines for men's wear this Fall. The 

greatest part of the money spent to 
sell men clothing will be spent at the 
local-retail level with manufacturers 
paving part of the cost for the men's 
clothiers. 

Price levels this Fall will be from 
20 to 40% lower than they were a 
year ago, and they won't be window 
dressing. Men just won't pay top prices 
for daily wearables. Lower prices will 



be the major appeal even of the class 
retailers. 



17. There has been little national 
broadcast advertising in the wo- 
men's wear field. Until Madamoi- 
selle, Glamour, Seventeen, Calling All 
Girls, and like magazines were pub- 
lished, there had been very few na- 
tional brands in the women's wear 
business. A few years ago Teen- 
Timers. Inc.. came to radio with an 
idea, a product, and a good junior- 
trade name. It was a top bobby-sox 
program, both on NBC and later on 
MBS with top point-of-sale promotion. 
It introduced the firm and its line of 
dresses and built an acceptance out- 
standing for a Seventh Avenue dress 
house. When the better garment mar- 
ket went to pieces in the bobby-sox 
field. Teen-Timers had to retrench. It's 
off the air and no nationally advertised 
line has thus far considered network 
advertising for the Fall. A few of the 
dress houses are making transcriptions 
available and paying part of the cost 
of local-retail advertising for their key 
outlets. A number of other firms are 
shooting film for use on local TV sta- 
tions and a few like Handmacher-Vogel 
are selling via film spots in certain 
TV areas. H-V is the exception rather 
than the rule but its success has 
prompted other women's suit makers to 
consider similar operations. TV may 
bring more women's wear makers to 
the air. 

More women's wear specialty shops 
used broadcast time this Spring than 
in many previous seasons. The formula 
hasn't been developed which permits 
them to use TV yet, but plans are 
afoot at a number of stations which 
should make it easy and inexpensive 
for women's specialty shops to use 
telecasting. 

18. Insurance had its best year in 
1948 and the first half of 1949 was 
even better. However, all insurance 
firms on the air, regionally as well as 
locally, are currently selling aggres- 
sively. This Fall, there will be even 
more pressure in broadcast commer- 
cials selling insurance and a number 
of life underwriters who have not used 
the air before will use national selec- 
tive advertising. It's possible that one 
national insurance firm that has been 
off the network air for years may re- 
turn this Fall and that another firm, 
new to broadcast advertising, may take 

(Please turn to page 64) 



18 JULY 1949 



27 



Sponsor cheek list 



htm- it* ust' hroadeast utlrvrtising -;- 



D 1 



n 



n 
n 



D 

D 

D 

D 

D_ 

D 



□ 



Determine what you expect broadcast advertising to do 
tor your organization.* 



a. Force distribution 



b. Move product 



c. Build Prestige 



d. Build brand name acceptance 



e. Improve dealer-manufacturer relations 



f. Impress stockholders 



g. Improve employee relations 



h. Supplement printed media advertising 



□ " 



Make certain that talent pictures, biographies and full 
program information (week-by-week details) are available 
to everyone requiring them. 



D '2 



□ 13 



i. Carry organization's primary advertising burden 



*The nine items cover general requirements of manufactur- 
ing and sales organizations but each organization has its 
own peculiar problems. These must be ascertained in ad- 
vance or else any advertising campaign will probably fail. 



□ 2 



□ 3 



Determine territorial coverage desired. 



Centralize responsibility for broadcast advertising. 



Working with your organization's advertising agency select 
the broadcast form (selective radio, network radio, TV, FM, 
storecasting, transitradio) to carry the campaign. 



^J ; Build or buy the proper program or announcement to reach 
the market for the product. 



□ « 



□ 7 



□ » 



The program and stations or network being selected, hold 
conferences with your staff so that the entire organization 
knows the campaign and its objectives. 



Hold district meetings with your sales staff, briefing them 
on the broadcast advertising campaign. There should be 
preliminary meetings during which ideas of the sales staff 
in the field are obtained on the campaign. 



Set up a public relations conference with network or 
station publicity men, your organization's publicity de- 
partment, agencie's press staff, independent publicity 
relations men of talent, and perhaps package owner 
publicity men.* 

'Working as a team these men can increase the audience 
of any program. Without organization and cooperative 
operation, waste through duplication of publicity material 
is inevitable. 



□ » 



□ io 



Establish a publicity plan for the campaign. 



Make c?rtain that everyone involved knows the person 

in the organization who is responsible for your broadcast 

advertising.* 

"That executive must be briefed on not only what the 

broadcast is supposed to accomplish but the public 

relations aspects of the program. 



□ 14 



Plan tie-in advertising, point-of-sale material, dealer 
mailings.* 

"Correlation of all advertising activity with broadcasting 
pays substantial dividends. 



Plan the program debut as a show, not as an opportunity 
for organization executives to discourage listeners through 
long talks. 



See that effective on-the-air promotion of program starts 
at least two weeks before the program makes its bow.* 

*Free network and station time is available but many 
advertisers are finding it productive of sales and increased 
audiences to buy bigger announcements to supplement 
what the stations and networks do. 



□ is 



□ io 



U 17 



□ is 



□ 19 



See that a complete promotion kit goes out to stations 
(if yours is a network program, the web's publicity de- 
partment will work with your agency and your advertising 
manager on this). 



Design a dealer and distributor promotion kit on the 
program.* 

"Make certain that the material does not duplicate that 
which network stations will use for the same purpose. 



Once the program has started to build its audience, travel 
it. 



Formulate plans for continuing promotion. Only through 
week-in-week-out exploitation can a new program really 
be sold to its full audience. 



Tie program in with 
plans. 



all merchandising and advertising 



D20 



Make certain that everything that is done promotion wise 
— guest stars — special exploitation reaches the publicity 
departments of the stations, networks and your distribu- 
tors and dealers in time for them to obtain newspaper space. 



"I *}J P\an mail-pulls (contests and give-aways) far enough in 
' advance so that they may be merchandized at the point- 
of-sale as well as on the air. 



~| 22 Don't forget to write "thank yous" to the stations that 
make promotion reports on your program. 



~| Hit Where possible have product packaging include refer- 
ence to the program. 



D2J 



Check newspaper reaction to the program.* 

*A special press clipping order is broadcast advertising 
life insurance.* 



f Broadcast advertising is a living thing; it requires broad- 
cast-by-broadcast watching, nursing, cultivating. It's a 
product that is being sold as well as one that is selling for 
you. Broadcasting has to be worked at and with to return 
full dividends. The easy way is the non-productive way. 



28 



SPONSOR 



It's 



a basic medium 




Age of specialization 

Specific buying groups can be reached 
as a result of pinpoint programing 



Radio listening is a habit. It's a 
habit that pays substantial dividends to 
broadcast advertisers. For years, it 
has been a habit which most advertis- 
ers have felt was built, nurtured, and, 
promoted almost solely by networks 
and their affiliated stations. This has 
never been 100% true, but it has been 
a common misconception. It's a greater 
fallacy today that it ever has been. 
That's because stations all over the na- 
tion are no longer trying to reach the 
great mass audience and are program- 
ing for specific segments of the pub- 
lic. One outlet becomes known as a 
sports station. Another is the music- 
and-news station. Still a third sta- 

18 JULY 1949 



tion becomes the favorite of the folk- 
music coterie. Competition has forced 
stations to stop trying to be something 
to everyone. Instead many are trying 
to reach and satisfy a vertical segment 
of the listening public. Stations are 
not only trying to build, but actually 
are building, audiences on this basis 
and are delivering sales at low cost. 

There was a time when it would 
have seemed impossible for any area 
to support over ten stations. Today 
there are a number of sections where 
it's possible, throsgh AM and FM com- 
bined, to tune over 20 stations and find 
most of the 20 doing a good job for 
advertisers. 



Vertically programed stations make 
it increasingly difficult for timebuyers 
to buy selective announcement and 
program time. They require a custom- 
tailoring of time buy to product 
and they also require careful sched- 
uling of the correct advertising mes- 
sage. As stations develop specialized 
audiences, agencies must conceive and 
release specialized advertising copy. 
This has always been done for foreign- 
language stations. It now must be 
done all over the nation when buying 
low-cost-per-listener outlets. 

Not only have non-network stations 
become very important during the past 
ten years, but recently many network 
outlets have let down the bars, and 
it's now possible, even on web owned- 
and-operated stations, to buy an- 
nouncement time between any and all 
programs. This does not mean that 
time is available on all stations for an- 
nouncements, but that all station break 



29 



f 



time is sold. There were a number 
of stations prior to 1948 that said 
"no" to announcements between top- 
appeal programs. There are practically 
none of them today. Not all announce- 
ment copy is acceptable by all sta- 
tion-, for in letting down the bars for 
station-break commercials the nation's 
great stations set up acceptance stand- 
ards that are just as high for the an 
nouncements as network standards are 
for in-program commercials. 

Timebuyers face a herculean task in 
setting selective schedules. Whereas it 
was a question of some 900 stations 
prior to the war, today it's a question 
of evaluating three times that number, 
without including the growing field 
of the visual air (76 stations this 
month). The total listening audience 
is increasing annually. Each radio re- 
ceiver (in non-TV homes) is receiving 
more usage per month because there's 
more and more varied fare on the air 
than ever before. 

Selective broadcast advertising has 



The farm audience 



grown faster than any other form of 
radio advertising. Its the air medium 
that permits an advertiser to spend as 
little or as much as his budget will 
permit. It's the air medium that en- 
ables the advertiser to evaluate, mar- 
ket-by-market, the effectiveness of his 
advertising. It has flexibility. It's 
backed with a miximum of station pro- 
motion. There's an extra plus this 
coming season. Program availability 
will be tops during the 1949-1 950 sea- 
son. 

TV is a great selective medium also. 
In this, sponsor's third annual Fall 
Facts edition, video has been consid- 
ered as a unit. The TV section, start- 
ing on page 97. reports on the visual 
air as a network, selective, and local- 
retail medium. It even considers it as 
a storecasting device. The time will 
come, however, when TV will be ac- 
cepted as just part of the broadcast ad- 
vertising picture. It will then be re- 
ported upon in the selective, network, 
and local-retail sections of sponsor's 
Fall Facts edition. + * -* 



llural listeners are worth cultivating, 
but don't forget to talk their language 



The term "farm market" may mean 
everything or nothing to an advertiser, 
depending on what he has to sell. That 
follows from the fact that there are 
big and little producers; that women, 
and to an important degree children, 
may be included in the phrase ''farm 
market." It is not enough at this 
time for an advertiser to know that 
the "farm market" despite an income 
slightly off from last year, still has 
more to spend than it ever had before 
( lush war years excepted ( . 

Farmers will still be buying what 
the) need. But they'll be buying more 
closely. That has two implications im- 
portant to advertisers. First, the days 
of being able to sell a prosperous farm- 
er anything up to a mechanized silo 
are slipping away, and no amount of 
advertising is likely to halt the trend. 
The shoe is a psychological one. and 
it's on the other foot. 

The successful advertising pitch for 
the forseeable future will show the 
farmer how the product actually en- 
ables him to cut operational costs, or 
in some positive manner add countable 
dollars and cents to his profits. While 



this has always been a foundation of 
solid selling to farmers as well as other 
producers, the fact is that now it must, 
in the light of the current economic 
mood, be emphasized at the expense of 
other approaches. 

It will also be necessary for many 
advertisers to carefully convince farm 
audiences they are not being robbed by 
increased prices for whatever the item 
may be. Frank and literal explanations 
of any price increases will be very 
much in order if sponsors succeed in 
avoiding a sales resistant wall of re- 
sentment at increasing prices in face 
of (at best) static farm incomes. 

Farmers are generally anticipating 
produce price declines in the Fall, and 
are therefore attempting to reduce their 
inventories. In situations where it can 
be definitely shown that conditions are 
such as to make lower prices on given 
commodities unlikely, the advertiser 
may do both himself and the farmer a 
favor by clarifying the matter. Nobody- 
is served if a farmer delays buying, for 
example, needed fertilizer only to dis- 
cover later in the year that its cost is 
higher or at best the same. The best 



contacts a sponsor can have to ascer- 
tain the feeling of a given farm market 
about supplies, equipment, etc. are the 
station farm director (where a full- 
time specialist is employed) and the 
County Agricultural Agent. 

The actual "farm market" doesn't 
consist merely of a farmer-prospect 
for supplies and equipment. Some 
phases of the farm business are almost 
exclusively under the control of the 
farm wife: in others her influence is 
important. She too will have to be 
convinced that a buy is good before 
she is favorably disposed to okay other 
than minimum necessary expenditures. 

Another aspect of the selling prob- 
lem is the actual breakdown of high- 
producing and low-producing farmers 
because of this influence on income. No 
substantial farm advertiser can afford 
to spend his ad-dollars in ignorance of 
who the high income group is and 
where it is located. According to a 
special report of the 1945 sample 
census of agriculture of the Census 
Bureau. 8.79r of the farmers get 50 r i 
of the farm income. 

This same report shows that instead 
of the nearly 6,000.000 "farmers" re- 
ported ( 1945 Census ) only about 
3.000,000 actually produce food for 
the market. 

These facts, including the distribu- 
tion throughout the country (as shown 
in charts accompanying the special re- 
port referred to above) of higher in- 
come farmers, strongly influence (or 
should) the programing policies of 
agricultural advertisers. 

It has been well-demonstrated that 
highlv specialized farm service pro- 
grams appeal to the higher-producing, 
more prosperous farmer. 

One of the important checks of po- 
tential audience-getting power, in addi- 
tion to previous sales records of farm 
programs, is whether the show is con- 
ducted by a qualified farm expert (the 
problems of farm programing are dis- 
cussed in detail in a sponsor series 
starting October. 1948). Once an ad- 
vertiser has determined to use a cer- 
tain station, it is to his interest to in- 
sist that the farm director be in on all 
phases of the campaign, particularly 
the commercials. He is in a unique 
position to understand his farm audi- 
ence. 

For the advertiser, a cheerful infer- 
ence to be drawn from the Census 
report previously referred to, is that 
the most lucrative part of the farm 
market — the higher-income group — is 
increasing. * * + 



30 



SPONSOR 







MR VOICL.fi GREATER HO THE DCTROIT AREA 





A 



Guardian Building, Detroit 26 

National Rep. 
Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 



Mutual System 

Canadian Rep." 
H. N. Stovin & Co. 




ii^L 



IS JULY 194? 



31 







V\A/WAAAArtAA/W\AAAAAA*\/W\AA 



Cooperative programs 



J 



IT'S ONLY A FEW 
BILLION 

POUABS 

• ••but 
WILL YOU GET 
YOUR SHARE? 



$2,995,897,000.00 

1948 Retail Sales* in WOW-LAND 
counties (BMB). 

All authorities agree this year's re- 
tail sales may be slightly lower . . . 
BUT . . . they also say , . 

26% 
28% 



of 1949 retail sales will 
be made in the third 
quarter; 

of 1949 retail sales will 
be made in the fourth 
quarter. 



5o-o-o- 
■tfpfgJrU <!«*" 

Get YOUR share of the . . . 

22% Spent in food stores; 

4QO>k Spent in general mer- 
chandise stores — inc. ap- 
parel and furniture; 

23 0/ Spent in other retail 
outlets. 

You WILL get Your share if 
you use the advertising facilities 
of Radio WOW— the ONLY 
single advertising medium that 
covers the vast territory within 
150 miles of Omaha in every 
direction. 

For availabilities see your John 
Blair man, or telephone Omaha, 
Webster 3400. 



* (Based on SALES MANAGEMENTS fig- 
ures — May 10, Survey of Buying Power — 
except lor Iowa, which is based on state 
sales tax receipts.) 



RADIO 



OMAHA 

SOOO WATTS • 590 KC 
JOHN J. GILLIN, JR., PRESIDENT 
JOHN BLAIR, REPRESENTATIVE 



WVAASW\AA/WVW\AAAAAA/\AAA* 



>BI8S and ABC constantly building new 
programs for selective sponsorship 



Network shows available as coopera- 
tives to local and regional sponsors 
give ABC and MBS networks a big 
stake in selective radio selling. For 
several years as good time periods 
have become scarcer, CBS co-ops have 
diminished. This Fall there will be 
only three, all news programs offered 
affiliates. NBC, who reached this happy 
state ahead of CBS, has four news 
shows available as co-ops. 

ABC is already offering four net- 
work TV programs to local advertisers. 
MBS, the leader in number of radio 
co-ops offered locally and in total num- 
ber of sponsors, will probably offer TV 
programs to local advertisers when the 
MBS-TV network is set. DuMont so 
far has made only one show. Small 
Fry, available on a local basis. Neither 
NBC nor CBS has any present plan to 
offer network TV programs as coopera- 
tives. 

With 21 radio shows MBS leads 
ABC by seven in number available to 
local sponsors. The theory of Bert 
Hauser, co-op department head, in sell- 
ing programs is to provide station 
salesmen with a continuous stream of 
promotion ammunition and keep ever- 



Out - of - home listening 



lastingly at them with suggestions on 
how to use it. ABC's Hal Day is also 
strongly promotion-minded. By last 
1 June, 304 MBS stations had co-op 
sponsors. Newsman Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
leads in number of stations sold. News 
has always been leading seller among 
the co-ops on all nets. Automotive 
agencies are Lewis' biggest sponsors, 
and news is a favorite program type 
with automotive people generally. Sales 
to them account for 15' [c of all MBS 
co-op sales. 

Kate Smith, John Nesbitt, Cedric 
Foster, and Gabriel Heatter follow in 
that order in number of MBS stations 
sold. 

ABC's 14 co-op programs have over 
800 sponsors. Best sellers are Agron- 
sky, Baukhage, Breakfast In Holly- 
wood, Headline Edition. Dorothy Dix, 
and Elmer Davis, in that order. The 
highly touted Abbott & Costello went 
off in June, never having attracted 
more than 50 sponsors at one time. 

Automotive dealers and suppliers 
still lead the parade of sponsors, but 
dairies, houeehold appliance firms, and 
building suppliers have made strong 
gains over last year. * * * 



The r *big plus* 9 in radio audiences is 
being measured for the first time 



The measuring of out-of-home lis- 
tening has really started. In the past 
few years there were a few stations 
like WRC, Washington; WHHM, 
Memphis; WHDH, Boston; WOR. 
WNEW, New York, and WITH, Bal- 
timore, that invested a few research 
dollars into different phases of out-of- 
home listening. The great mass of 
stations simply forgot all about it. 

WRC wanted to find out about the 
listening that went on in automobiles 
in the nations capitol as did many 
sponsors. They found out that during 
certain early a.m. hours it exceeded 
listening in homes. WOR checked lis- 
tening at beaches and found out that 
it was sizable. WNEW checked fac- 



tory and other out-of-home listening. 
It also found that it was sizable. WITH 
checked listening in business places. 

The problem that now faces adver- 
tisers who are interested in reaching 
out-of-home audiences is to obtain 
facts and figures on just which sta- 
tions dominate in each area. Many 
are convinced that the out-of-home lis- 
tening is important. 

There is little question but that 
station WITH leads in radio audiences 
in Baltimore's commercial establish- 
ments. The Johns Hopkins School of 
business had two seniors make a sur- 
vey of the business area of the city. 
WITH was first in grocery, and drug 
(Please turn to page 36) 



32 



SPONSOR. 



' 







M 



6666 



"W* 



® 






, 



■■. 















mm. 



IDENTIFYING BRANDS IS EASY 

. . . when you know what to look for ! 



p RANDS are read from top to bottomland from left to right p> . 
They represent plane geometry in its ABC -form. For example, a straight 

horizontal line is a rail, such as a ^O takes to build a corral. A 

similar line turned at an angle \ or this / is a slash. A shorter horizontal 
line _ is a bar. Here's a box Q ; a circle Q is larger and rounder 
than the letter o. Sometimes a rancher uses a quarter circle /< ~ > * , or a half 
circle f l . Upside down y, it may become a rocking symbol, thus: > fv / 
the Rocking R. A running brand, such as the Running M, </Z/£/ extends 
itself and leans slightly ahead. Lazy brands, like the Lazy 3, lie down: LA-/- 
Brands fly, too, in the manner of the Flying X: jC . Many brands explain 
themselves. There are millions of combinations possible to produce these 



romantic 



V J pyroglyphics i%fQ<:'- of the range. Using the above tips, how 



'Ro- 



many of the brands on this page can you identify? Identifying brands is 
easy, pardner, when you know what to <e* *S> for. In the Bv-£/ 



.^ 



Southwest folks have a cinch identifying brands of products 
OQoO ' to °' Decause \W campaigns over the Famous Brand 
Station \J\J Kj hi I tell them what to <j> <s> f° r - Are 



telling them about YOURS? 



£ 



s7 









Here's a message in Brand Language from lf\l \J r-i I 
4 NONE VLU AT A/N $ GO ~2~ 



9 



•:■:•;•:■:■:■:■:■:■, :•;■:■: ;. . 




HJsented by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. - New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, St. Louis, Dallas, San Francisco, Atlanta, Boston 



Exclusive Representatives: 
Radio 



ALBUQUERQUE 


KOB 


BEAUMONT 


KFDM 


BOISE 


KDSH 


BOSTON-SPRINGFIELD 


WBZ-WBZA 


BUFFALO 


WGR 


CHARLESTON, S. C. 


WCSC 


COLUMBIA, S. C. 


WIS 


CORPUS CHRISTI 


KRIS 


DAVENPORT 


woe 


DES MOINES 


WHO 


DENVER 


KVOD 


DULUTH 


WDSM 


FARGO 


WDAY 


FT. WAYNE 


WOWO 


FT. WORTH-DALLAS 


WBAP 


HONOLULU-HILO 


KGMB-KHBC 


HOUSTON 


KXYZ 


INDIANAPOLIS 


WISH 


KANSAS CITY 


KMBC-KFRM 


LOUISVILLE 


WAVE 


MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 


WTCN 


NEW YORK 


WMCA 


NORFOLK 


WGH 


OMAHA 


KFAB 


PEORIA-TUSCOLA 


WMBD-WDZ 


PHILADELPHIA 


KYW 


PITTSBURGH 


KDKA 


PORTLAND, ORE. 


KEX 


RALEIGH 


WPTF 


ROANOKE 


WDBJ 


ST. LOUIS 


KSD 


SEATTLE 


KIRO 


SYRACUSE 


WFBL 


Television 




BALTIMORE 


WAAM 


FT. WORTH-DALLAS 


WBAP-TV 


LOUISVILLE 


WAVE-TV 


MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 


WTCN-TV 


NEW YORK 


WPIX 


ST. LOUIS 


KSD-TV 


SAN FRANCISCO 


KRON-TV 




Old Colonel F&P isn't really an elderly 
jelloiv — his average age is slightly under 
40. But he's certainly "been around"! 
For instance, our 22 Free & Peters Colo- 
nels have had an aggregate of 69 years 
in college, alone, even though some of 
us didn't ever get past High School! 



34 



SPONSOR 



M 



7^ 



H 



^/ 



& 




r 

ONE 




F 




Sac6elo>i o£ /4nfo, Sciences, 



Y, 



. ESSIR, he's a graduate of Amherst, 
Brown, California, Columbia, Duke, North- 
western, Wisconsin, and lots more! 

That's why he kin read and rite so good! 

But far more important to you, Colonel 
F&P (who is all the men at Free & Peters) 
has his degree in the field of radio and tele- 
vision selling, too. 

To F&P, "selling" does not mean the 
art of slapping backs, passing out cigars, or 



remembering your childrens' names. To 
us, selling means knowing all there is to 
know about our "product" — organizing all 
this data and information so that we can 
find it when you want it — then passing it 
on to you promptly and in whatever detail 
you wish, whenever you need it in your 
business. 

What facts or figures on national spot 
radio or television do you want, now? 
We'd certainly like to supply them! 



F 



P 



REE & Jr ETERS, INC 

Pioneer Radio and Television Station Representatives 

Since 1932 



NEW YORK 



ATLANTA 



DETROIT 



FT. WORTH 



CHICAGO 



HOLLYWOOD 



SAN FRANCISCO 



18 JULY 1949 



35 



OUT-OF-HOME LISTENING 

(Continued from jtage 32) 

stores, in barber and beauty shops. It 
was also first in bars and grills. Other 
stations had sizable audiences in Bal- 
timore business establishments but 
WITH appeared, in the Johns Hopkins 
survey, to lead in most categories. 
However it's only in Baltimore that 
such a survey has been made. Other 
surveys have been one station surveys 
and do not show listening to all sta- 
tions. 

To indicate the size of the audience 
that listens in commercial establish- 



ments, Johns Hopkins survey revealed 
that 17.1 /^ of its sample among gro- 
cery stores had radio receivers in op- 
eration. In other types of establish- 
ments the percentages ran in the fol- 
lowing manner. 

% in which radio 
Business was playing 

Drug Stores 13.0% 

Bars & Taverns 20.7% 

Barber Shops 42.2% 

Beauty Shops 24.3% 

New figures for out-of-home listen- 
ing in greater New York will be re- 
leased by WNEW shortly. However 
the Pulse figure of last April revealing 
that 28.7% of a sample which it inter- 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S lJ<&M&eA, RADIO STATION 




YEARS 

of continuous service to Roanoke 
and Southwest Virginia, and our 
20th consecutive year with CBS. 

WDBJ's potential audience is over a million people who 
can spend almost a billion dollars yearly. 

<=-> 1924-1949 -*€=> 




viewed in New York reported that they 
listened to radio out of the home on 
an average day is startling enough to 
prove how important this unreported 
audience really is. Pulse's out-of-home 
listening showed that 



percent 


listened in 


39.8 


automobiles 


26.4 


at work 


32.0 


visiting 


9.7 


bars and grills 


7.3 


retail stores 


1.0 


outdoors* 


1.4 


miscl 



• low because this was not studied for this 
report during the summer months. 

The 39.8 percent figure for auto- 
mobile radio listening is vitally impor- 
tant since WOR's figures reveal that 
there are 1,523,802 car radios in 
metropolitan New York— 72.8% of all 
the cars in New York being radio 
equipped. 

Seldom has there ever been an ad- 
vertising medium that has so short- 
changed itself as broadcast advertis- 
ing, by not counting millions of its 
circulation. It is as if the outdoor 
advertising field only counted the peo- 
ple in the buildings around a billboard 
and never stopped to count the people 
who walked past or drove past the 
spot. The outdoor advertising field 
will never do that. 

Out-of-home listening is market-by- 
market listening. There are hundreds 
of thousands for instance who go out 
of their way to listen to play-by-play 
broadcasts of baseball games. One 
cigarette sponsor admitted that he had 
bought the home games of a team 
practically 100% on the basis of pub- 
lic-place listening. To this tobacco ad- 
vertiser, the home audience was the 
bonus and the at-work and public- 
place listeners his audience. 

The survey which this great cigar- 
ette firm made will never be released. 
It was made for the tobacco firm and 
the research organization that made it 
turned all raw figures as well as the 
finished survey over to the client. 

Before another Fall Facts issue rolls 
around, there will be plenty of out-of- 
home listening data available. Broad- 
cast advertising is being forced out its 
lethargy — is being forced to stop tak- 
ing the impact of its medium for 
granted. Sponsors will have the neces- 
sary facts that will tell them just what 
they're buving besides Hooperated or 
Nielsen indexed homes. 

Certain products can be sold better 
to the listener who's out of the home. 
The advertiser should know the size of 
this audience — and should plan his 
commercials so that he can effectively 
sell it. * + + 



36 



SPONSOR 




IVTIO 

7V#£^ PROSPEROUS 
SQUrHBRH NEW EHtVI^ 

/MARKET 



\ 







Paul W. Morency, Viee-Pres.— Gen. Mgr. Waller Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr.— Sales Mgr. 

WTIC'S 50,000 WATTS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY WEED & CO. 

18 JULY 1949 37 



Carl is 
Touched! 




Carl has been touched by Dame 
Fortune and Miss Fortune! 

He has been touched by relatives 
and in-laws! 

But the thing that really touches 
our Carl is when he re-reads some 
of the nice fan mail we get from our 
cash customers. 

Such nice things they say about 
WDSM and WEVE. For instance, 
a local brewer. His sales were in a 
bad tail-spin. So 7 weeks ago he 
bought WDSM and WEVE . . . . 
figuring that because he could get 
these 2 stations for the price of ONE 
Duluth station .... he'd have two 
horses in the race! 

Yesterday the brewery's sales 
manager sent Carl a letter telling 
how nicely sales were going . . . 
and admitting that because he was 
only using WDSM and WEVE to 
tell their story .... that must be 
the reason for the pick-up in sales. 

Yes, it's things like fan-mail from 
clients and pats on the back from 
our listeners that make running a 
radio station such a pleasure. 

Business is good because local and 
national advertisers are finding out 
that WDSM (Duluth) and WEVE 
(the Iron Range) can really do a 
selling job, if used in combination. 
Best of all you pay only the ONE 
station cost; and get 2 ABC sta- 
tions working for you, telling your 
story to everybody in our neck of 
the woods. 

There are more powerful stations 
than ours, there are stations with 
nicer upholstery in the waiting room, 
but there aren't any stations in this 
area that'll work harder to promote 
your show on the air than WDSM 
and WEVE. 

Just ask a Free & Peters man for 
the whole story. Thanks. 



Block programing 

Mood scheduling can deliver a specific 
audience* in tune with sponsor's product 



There is no substitute for block pro- 
graming, when it comes to buying an 
audience for broadcast advertising, ex- 
cept perhaps a $20,000 plus name pro- 
gram with an assured following. Even 
the "big name" may fall on his face, 
which is why Jack Benny continues to 
sweat every time a new Hooper and 
Nielsen rating is published. 

The perfect example of block pro- 
graming on the networks is the back- 
to-back presentation of the soap and 
drug sponsored daytime serials, radio's 
low-cost commericial audience-getters. 
NBC's Tuesday night comedy skein. 
CBS's Monday evening drama festival 
and ABC's Friday night chill-and-thrill- 
them group are limited nighttime ver- 
sions of the fact that the listening au- 
dience does not want a variety of pro- 
grams but a lot of the same thing. 



WORKED 
ABOUT 

YOUR 
LIFE 

SPANN (Ky-) ? 

■nin" worse* 

For health, ha P* m ? he Louisville 

^ rading /to 27 Kentucky and 
y ou need. It» *< oU *hat 

Indiana *ountie»g days a 

the doctor «fSi«nce whose 

Effective Buries , , fcs , n ah 

Jc, above that oj } 

4 ' . „i the State! 

the rest of the Aenjoy 

so^r^?*^ Set? 

life with WA> 

Let's go-' mm *m 

LOUISVUI.*^ 




CBS' Frank Stanton discovered this 
when he was doing qualitative diary 
research. He labeled it "mood pro- 
graming.'' Bernice Judis' very sensi- 
tive station pocketbook had discovered 
.it at WNEvv sometime before Dr. 
Stanton. 

The listening habit may even be 
broken by a newscast, although a five- 
minute news session seldom chases 
even a small percentage of an audience. 
Patt McDonald at WHHM, checking 
his ratings, discovered early in the 
operation of WHHM that they didn't 
want to hear the news regularly over 
his outlet. Being an old hand of giv- 
ing his listeners what they want and 
not what listeners want in another 
section of the country, McDonald cut 
his newscasts to a minimum, keeping 
only those that justified themselves by 
producing ratings. 

McDonald discovered to what ex- 
treme block-program listeners will go. 
WHHM's special breed of fans wanted 
their music sessions unbroken, even by 
news. In contrast, most stations 
throughout the country find that five 
minutes of news, on the hour or half 
hour, holds on to ears. 

While main sections of the country 
want their disks played with a mini- 
mum of conversation, there are sec- 
tions where plenty of the right kind 
of talk produces more sales than just 
spinning disks. 

The local personality is vital in disk 
jockeving. Tommy Dorsey and Duke 
Ellington have built some audiences 
with their disk sessions, but it's the 
Martin Blocks of America who really 
deliver audiences and sales. 

Sponsors have asked time and time 
again how to determine whether or not 
a block-programed stretch had an ef- 
fective audience. In areas that have 
City Hooperatings it's possible to look 
at the ratings. That helps. However, 
it doesn't tell the entire story. Jockeys 
of block-programed musical disk ses- 
sions frequently may not have the 
highest Hooperatings but just as fre- 
quently that have the most faithful 
buying audiences. The safe way for a 
sponsor to check a block-programed 
station or disk session is to ask the 
station for a result-story on the show. 
There isn't a successful disk jockey 



38 



SPONSOR 



BIGGEST- studio audiences! 



BEST- in station promotion! 



FIRST- in total rated periods! 



^December through April Hooper Report 








STATION PROMOTION 



Over 100,000 people visit WFBR every year 
— no other Baltimore station is even close! 

Just won 3rd award nationally in the annual 
BILLBOARD competition. No other Baltimore 
station won any award! 



HOOPER RATINGS 



Tops in Baltimore! First in morning, first in 
afternoon, first in total rated periods! 



When the last ounce of intensive coverage is needed 
— when the advertising has to deliver — in the 
Baltimore market, you need look no further than... 







ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS IN B ALTI M O R E, . M D. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 

18 JULY 1949 39 



holding down a block of time who 
hasn't at least one astounding success 
story. The amount of merchandise 
these musical salesmen have sold is 
enough to turn the current recession 
into inflation. 

Block programing must be handled 
different!) at different hours of the 
day. What is effective from midnight 
to dawn can be obnoxious at three 
o'clock in the afternoon. What is zany- 
effective at 7 a.m. would kill them at 
noon. A block-programed musical ses- 
sion in the morning wouldn't be satis- 
factory in the 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. hours. 
These latter two hours are top-flight 
disk jockey time. Martin Block does 
his best selling on WNEW during this 
period. These are the dinner-prepara- 
tion hours — when the American house- 
wife listens with a faint hope that 
some day hubby will purr like Block, 
or his counterpart in other sections of 
the U.S.A. 

It is important to realize that when 
a station forsakes the block program 
formula, and nearly every station un- 
der sponsor pressure forsakes it at 
sometime of the day. that some other 
station can and frequently does pick 
up the audience that was listening to 
the block-programed station before the 
mood was shattered. This audience- 
stealing device is less common than it 
might be. for the stations that are in a 
position to program against the compe- 
tition are frequently block-programing 
themselves and can't afford to break 
their own mood. There are, however, 
a number of stations that use the 
contra-programing device and have 
proved it successful. 

There's nothing difficult about con- 
tra-programing. All that sponsor or 
station has to do is to see what is not 
on the air at any specific time and 
program that. Thus if there is no 
sweet music being broadcast — schedule 
it. If the air is full of mystery, give 
them music. If all is music, it's time 
for a whodunit. 

It's possible to collect on a block- 
programed station, or network skein 
inexpensively — it doesn't require a big 
name or expensive program to do it. 

One thing is certain, when a sponsor 
buys 15 minutes in a block-programed 
period he doesn't have to build an 
audience. He's buying one ready to 
be sold. There is something else that's 
certain. A program log of a block 
programed station is easy to identify. 
Shows are not scheduled by 15 minute 
periods but by a minimum of 90 min- 
utes. * * * 




Yes, radio offers more impressions for the same money. Surveys have 
proved also that more people listen to the average daytime quarter 
hour program than notice the average national advertisement in the 
nation's largest newspapers. 

For example, in Washington 32,300 adults listen to the average daytime 
quarter- hour program on WRC, while only 13,300 adults note (not 
necessarily read) the average national advertisement in Washington's 
largest morning newspaper.* Your NBC Spot salesman has a compre- 
hensive radio listening— newspaper reading analysis of the Washington 



B C 




40 



SPONSOR 










market. Write, wire or call your NBC Spot salesman for full informa- 
tion and availabilities on all these major U. S. radio stations. 

*Sources available on request. 

New York WNBC 

Chicago WMAQ 

Cleveland WTAM 

Washington WRC 

San Francisco KNBC 

Denver KOA 

Schenectady WGY 



SPOT SALES 

New York • Chicago ■ Cleveland • Hollywood * San Francisco 'Washington ■ Denver 



Availabilities 

It's good hunting for 
"breaks" this Fall 

Announcement availabilities are not 
tight this Fall. That's due to a number 
of factors, not the least of which is 
lack of prohibitions against them on 
big network and important local sta- 
tions. The fight against "over-commer- 
cialization" has gone by the boards. 
NBC is no longer urging its affiliates 
not to sell evening chain breaks and 2(1 
second announcements are heard even 
on the key stations of NBC and CBS. 

The big stations still shy away from 
plug-uglies, and there are very few 
irritant commercials on these outlets. 
Surveys conducted by McCann-Erick- 
son, and a number of other agencies, 
have revealed that while irritant an- 
nouncements may achieve identifica- 
tion for a product, they do not neces- 
sarily sell. The commercial that irri- 
tates and sells is the exception. I It can 
be and has been done. I 

Weather announcements were used 
this past season almost as frequently 
as time breaks by sponsors. Amazing 
as it may sound, however, there was 
and is plenty of time and weather an- 
nouncement selective time available. 
Many advertisers believe that time an- 
nouncements are restricted to watch 
manufacturers. While this is true to 
a limited extent, there are many other 
advertisers that can use a time quality 
in their selling that can purchase time 
breaks simply by submitting suggested 
continuity to stations. 

One sponsor who found how well 
time and weather breaks can sell has 
been trying out a station break pur- 
chase on an "if" basis. If it rains his 
copy for rubbers and umbrellas is 
used on open weather and time breaks. 
Stations generally do not like this "if" 
business, but accept and do a fine job 
with it. when it comes their way. Mo- 
tion picture theaters have discovered 
time breaks to be ideal. "The time is 
6 p.m.. time to see Alan Ladd in The 
Great Gadsby at the Paramount" type 
of announcement has been found to do 
all thats necessary for top pictures. 
Pictures without top names, or pictures 
that have not received a good press, 
may need more selling, but it can be 
and is being done with time announce- 
ments. 

Any service or informative type an- 
nouncement fits into a public service 
tvpe of station or chain break. Every- 



!8 JULY 1949 



41 



it's easy, 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 




XES, the hand is quicker than the eye, but down here in Deep 

Dixie, the ear is quicker than either. An extra "r" in the accent, 

or a little lack of tact about several subjects — well, you know. . . . 

We of KWKH are Southerners. We talk and think like all the 

rest of our people down here. 

For 23 years we've studied our audience, and the 
results are reflected in our Hooper ratings. For 
March-April, 1949 our showing for Total Rated 
Periods was 38% better than our next "com- 
petitor." 

Whatever you have to sell in our market, KWKH is your best 
radio buy. We can prove it. Interested? 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



Texas 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



Arkansas 
CBS Mississippi 

The Branham Company, Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 



42 



body's interested in the weather and 
the time. The commercial copy used 
u ith time and weather breaks must fit 
in with the time and weather announce- 
ment. Stations will not generally ac- 
cept copy for these breaks which does 
not belong with the information. 

Advertising agency and station re- 
presentative executives point out that 
the number of products that can ef- 
fectively use time breaks are almost 
legion. The reps haven't stressed ten- 
second time break availabilities too 
much because they'd rather sell pro- 
grams and minute participations. 

The request for such availabilities 
and information on the limitations that 
individual stations place upon their 
use must originate with the advertiser 
or his agency. 

Time breaks are ideal periods in 
which to make a test of a product or 
campaign. They usually bring imme- 
diate results. They've built Bulova and 
Eenrus, to mention just two watch 
manufacturers, and they can be used 
to build a number of other products. 

"It's four p.m. Have you Glass- 
Waxed your windows lately? Glass 
Wax is available at your grocer, drug, 
or paint store." 

Weather or time, those announce- 
ments achieve attention without irri- 
tating. * -* -* 



Station representatives 

Station sale agents 
know, sell product 

Station representatives during the 
past year have accepted a new job — 
they're selling broadcast advertising, 
a job that the NAB's Bureau of Broad- 
cast Advertising is scheduled to do, 
when it gets going. 

Not only have representatives in- 
dividually been active selling broad- 
cast advertising, not just the stations 
they represent, but their association 
has been making presentations on be- 
half of the selective medium to firms 
like Waltham Watch. 

The story of selective broadcast ad- 
vertising has been told only occasion- 
ally. Stations have been bought in 
many markets almost entirely because 
they were affiliated with a network, and 
announcement time has been bought 
"between two top programs." The sta- 
tions as entities have been, for too 
long, just transmitters. 

Station representatives can be of 

SPONSOR 







Right where it SELLS! 



Ever observed people watching a good TV 
Show? . . . Then you've noticed that their 
eyes and ears both are "at attention". . . that 
a good TV commercial can hit them with 
the impact of a punch right on the button. 

To make sure your TV punch reaches the 



greatest possible number of people, be sure 
to schedule Fort Industry's 3 TV stations: 
WSPD-TV (NBC, CBS & DuMont), Toledo; 
WJBK-TV (CBS & DuMont), Detroit; 
WAGA-TV (CBS & DuMont), Atlanta. 
Get your guard up — call Katz for availa- 
bilities. Now — today! 




THE FORT INDUSTRY COMPANY 

WSPD, Toledo, Ohio • WWVA, Wheeling, W. Va. • WMMN, Fairmont, W. Va. 

WLOK, Lima, Ohio • WAGA, Atlanta, Ga. • WGBS, Miami, Fla. • WJBK, Detroit, Mich. 
WSPD-TV, Toledo, Ohio • WJBK-TV, Detroit, Mich. • WAGA-TV, Atlanta, Ga. 

National Sales Headquarters: 527 Lexington Ave., New York 17, Eldorado 5-2455 



18 JULY 1949 



43 



great help to a sponsor in merchandis- 
ing his broadcast advertising. Each 
station has its own routine of handling 
matters like courtesy announcements, 
car cards and other forms of display, 
newspaper advertising, and the host of 
other program promotions that help 
increase audiences and dealer accept- 
ance for broadcast-advertised products. 
They are ready these days not only to 
sell but to service accounts — and in 
many cases station representatives have 
men in their organizations who are 
promotion specialists, even though they 
may double as salesmen. 



Station representatives are basically 
salesmen. They are successful only 
when they do an effective job of sell- 
ing for their stations. Stations may 
appreciate all the operating help a rep- 
sentative gives them, but they judge 
their reps 100% on the basis of the 
volume of business they sign. It's much 
easier for reps to visit timebuyers at 
agencies and fight for their station's 
share of existent business than it is to 
contact advertisers that are not using 
broadcast advertising. For this reason 
advertisers in many cases have to in- 
quire of a station representative in 



BIGGEST AUDIENCES 

in New England's 2nd Largest Market 

LISTEN TO WPRO 

the Whole* Year ''Round! 



HOOPER STATION AUDIENCE INDEX 

CITY: Providence, Pawtucket, R. 1. MONTHS: Dec, 1948 thru Apr., 194? 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 




TIME 


WPRO 


Sta. B 


Sta.C 


Sta.D 


Sta.E 


Sta.F 


Sta.G 




MON. thru FRI. 
8 A.M. -NOON 


38.5 


17.5 


20.9 


13.5 


4.5 


2.0 


1.8 


MON. thru FRI. 
NOON- 6 P.M. 


31.8 


20.0 


18.8 


11.8 


11.2 


5.7 


1.6 


SUN. thru SAT. 
6-10:30 P.M. 


35.4 


26.9 


14.8 


18.3 


(Off Local Sunset) 









MORNINGS: 



WPRO's Share of Audience is GREATER than the 
COMBINED SHARES of network stations B and C . . . 
and almost EQUAL to the COMBINED SHARES of 
network stations B, D, and indies E, F, and G. 



AFTERNOONS: WPRO's Share of Audience is GREATER than the 
COMBINED SHARES of network stations C and D . . . 
and EQUAL to the COMBINED SHARES of network 
stations B and D. 

EVENINGS: WPRO's Share of Audience is GREATER than the 

COMBINED SHARES of network stations C and D . . . 
and 8.5 percentage points higher than network sta- 
tion B. 

* All latest seasonal reports (available on request) show WPRO 
FIRST in Share of Audience. 



WPRO 



PROVIDENCE 



BASIC CBS 1 5000 WATTS 



AM&FM 



630 KC. 



Represented by Raymer 



order to discover just what broadcast 
advertising can do for him. The Na- 
tional Association of Station Repre- 
sentatives stands ready to present the 
selective side (market-by-market) side 
of broadcast advertising. Since this 
is the direct result side of the medium, 
advertisers are apt to learn more of 
how radio can sell through station rep- 
resentatives than they can through any 
other group in broadcasting. 

Of late, station representatives in 
many cases have separated their radio 
and television operations, even going 
so far in the case of John Blair as to 
set up a distinct corporate entity for 
TV station representation. Other rep- 
resentatives haven't gone this far, but 
they have TV specialists in their offices 
who know television and very little 
else. The tendency, more and more, is 
for TV to be treated as a medium dis- 
tinct and apart from radio. 

Station representatives, just as other 
factors in television, are not making 
money in this field. Their radio sell- 
ing pays for their TV servicing, in 
most cases. The important thing for 
sponsors to keep in mind is that sta- 
tion representatives can help them 
make broadcast advertising a more ef- 
fective sales medium. + * + 



97,410 Radio Homes 

in the area served by 

KMLB 

— fhe station with more 
listeners than all other 
stations combined — 

IN N.E. LOUISIANA 

Right in Monroe, you can reach an audi- 
ence with buying power comparable to 
Kansas City, Missouri. 17 La. parishes 
and 3 Ark. counties are within KMLB's 
milevolt contour. Sell it on KMLB! 




KMLB 

MONROE. LOUISIANA 

* TAYLOR-BORROFF & CO.. lac. 
National Representatives 

* AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 
5000 Worts Doy • 1000 Wotit Htgkt 



44 



SPONSOR 




18 JULY 1949 



45 



9 



WANTED 
ALIVE- 

Description: 

Age: Old enough to realize 
that a buyers' market pre- 
vails, and interested in mak- 
ing his advertising dollars go 
further. 

Identification: Shrewd, in- 
telligent and interested in 
reaching a vast new poten- 
tial customer audience for his 
product at the lowest cost per 
prospect in Houston radio. 
Goes by the name of sponsor, 
alias on-the-ball merchant. 

REWARD 

To the agency or account 
that brings in this WANTED 
PERSON • . KNUZ will clear 
"COLLIE'S CORRAL" 12:30 
p.m. to 12:45 p.m. Monday 
thru Friday, or "COLLIE'S 
CORRAL" 12:45 p.m. to 1:00 
p.m. Monday thru Friday. 
BOTH quarter hour segments 
of the "CORRAL" have the 
'NUMBER ONE LISTENING 
AUDIENCE IN HOUSTON. 
WITH A QUARTER HOUR 
HOOPER RATING of 4.5 and 
5.4 respectively. 

* (Winter- Spring Hooper re- 
port Dec, 1948, thru April, 
1949). Anyone knowing the 
whereabouts of the above 
person 

Contact Nearest 

"Sheriff's" Department 

Forjoe 

or 

"Sheriff" Dave Morris 
CEntral 8801 

k-nuz 

9th Floor Scanlan Bldg. 
Houston, Texas 



Independent stations 

II i£ sponsors eye non-net outlets with 
interest as result of proved impact 



The independent station is pulling 
its own weight and then some for 
broadcast advertisers. Its sports, music, 
and news formula reaches an audience 
that is seldom served by stations that 
do not block-program their schedules. 
It is not unusual in reading Hooperat- 
ings' new pocket piece to note that the 
independents' share-of-audience is big- 
ger than any single network attraction. 

It has only been of late that non- 
network stations have had a sufficient 
audience in all of Hooper's 36-city ran- 
dom telephone home sample to make 
reporting their share-of-audience fig- 
ures necessary. Taking the 15-21 June 
Hooper report for reference, there are 
periods in the week when independent 
stations have a greater audience than 
Chesterfield Supper Club. Tuesday 21 
June saw the Supper Club with a 
Hooper of 4.0 and a non-network sta- 
tion rating of 5.2. the independent sta- 
tions' share of audience being 26.2' <. 
Even mid-evening on the same Tues- 
day, 8:30-9 p.m.. independent stations 
were within .8 of a rating point of the 
top mystery, Mr. and Mrs. North. The 
independents had a rating of 6. Other 
network programs on the air at the 
same time had ratings of 2.3, 4.2. and 
4.1. 

Tuesday night is not an unusual 
night on the air for independent non- 
network stations. After 10 p.m. on 
Monday (20 June 1949) against the 
top-appeal My Friend Irma with a 
rating of 11.9, the non-network sta- 
tions in the 36 Hooper cities had a 
rating of 7.5. The top network pro- 
gram aside from Irma had 3.8. 

Night after night the Program Hoop- 
eratings' pocket piece has evidence of 
the growing audience of the inde- 
pendents. Since these ratings are aver- 
aged for the entire 36 cities, with the 
cities being located from coast to coast, 
they give consistent proof of regular 
listening to non-network outlets. The 
ratings include stations without big 
audiences and also top listening out- 
lets like WHDH. Boston; WHHM, 
Memphis; WNEW. N. Y., and WCKY, 
Cincinnati. These are representative 
of the block-programed stations but 
they are not all of the same breed. 
WHDH, Boston, owes its great audi- 
ences to its top sports' schedule. 



WNEW, N. Y., is a music-news-pro- 
motion programs outlet. WCKY is 
music, news, and sports program sched- 
uled, but also depends to a substantial 
degree on its western disk jockey sched- 
uling. WHHM. is disk jockey pro- 
gramed and uses a great deal of folk 
music (no jug bands I . WHHM proves 
that although every section of the coun- 
try that supports a City Hooper Re- 
port has a Bing Crosby disk session 
in its First Ten programs, a well pro- 
gramed independent can even get 
along without Bing. WHHM hasn't 
played a Crosby record yet. 

The success of the non-network sta- 
tion is based upon the fact that it does 
not try to program for everyone. Its 
schedules are designed for a specific 
segment of the listening audience. Thus 
WOV serves Italian New York in the 
daytime, swingsters to around 10 p.m. 
and then goes Western Hillbilly. Since 
there's very little range music heard 
on the air in the metropolis, Rosalie 
Allen's boots-and-saddle disc spinnings 
have amazing audiences. 

When WVNJ started to compete 
with the New York stations from New- 
ark. N. J. it decided to pay, as a gen- 
eral policy, "sweet" music — neither too 
hot nor too cold. Now as an inter- 
viewer walks along the streets of New 
York, hearing the sweet strains of 
WVNJ are not unusual. In certain 
sections, during certain hours of the 
day, it's a veritable little symphony of 
WVNJ, just as in other sections WQXR 
plays the major melody. 

When WLIB I with the blessing of 
the FCC ) passes to the control and 
management of Morris Novik, it plans 
to be programed for the two-million 
English-speaking Jewish in New York 
and its vast colored population. These 
are two groups which have not had anv 
special programing, and there is every 
reason to believe that WLIB. which 
hasn't reached a really top commercial 
audience during its several manage- 
ments, will under its new plan have 
something very special for advertisers. 

Under the shadow of New York's 
great stations, and under the shadows 
of the great stations in most metro- 
polises, there is a suburban station 
programed for its own select neigh- 
( Please turn to page 76) 



46 



SPONSOR 



%&* MONTH IN TBI YUB 

a mm 

BESTBUf! 

Number of Greater Boston Radio Homes 




Reached for Each Dollar Spent 



1300 

1200 

1100 

1000 

900 

800 

700 

600 

500 

400 

300 

200 

100 



WHDH 



NETWORK 
STATION A 



NETWORK 
STATION D 



NETWORK 
STATION B 



NETWORK 
STATION C 



'Based on the lafest 12 months Hooper "Share of Audience" Reports April-May 1948 — 
April-May 1949 and average cost per spot on the four network stations and WHDH. 



w. 



hen you buy WHDH you will reach 
50% more Greater Boston radio homes 
than on Network Station A; 77% more 
than Network Station B; 78% more than 
Network Station C; and 54% more than 
Network Station D. Ask your John Blair 
man for the complete information on 
how to get more for your radio dollar 
in Boston. 



NOW 50,000 WATTS 

WHDH 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE BOSTON HERALD-TRAVELER 



Represented Nationally by John Blair & Co. 

18 JULY 1949 47 







Regional networks 

Inherent advantages of sectional we lis 
boost commercial use throughout nation 



The growth of television, transit- 
radio, and facilities that permit inten- 
sive coverage, is causing sponsors to 
consider more and more carefully sell- 
ing methods that will let them make the 
most of markets that have their own 
peculiar problems. 

These problems range from strong 



listener bias for certain program types 
and personalities to highly individual 
local conditons affecting both distri- 
butor and retail phases of marketing. 
One way of taking advantage of local 
peculiarities is through the use of the 
regional network. Where the manage- 
ment is aggressive and member sta- 



Think I'll buy 

both them heifers.' 




I 



f you'd like to see some doggone wonderful "im- 
pulse buying," you oughta watch us Red River Val- 
ley hayseeds! We got far higher than national average 
income — and, by golly, we spends it! 

And if you'd like to get your share of this lavish 
North Dakota spendin', you'd better use WDAYl Many 
advertisers don't even consider other outlets. Latest 
Hoopers prove WDAY's a 5-to-l favorite in Fargo and 
Moorhead. And we've got proof of exceptional rural 
loyalty, too! 

Write to us direct, or ask Free & Peters for all the 
dope. You'll be amazed — and convinced! 



WDAV 




FARGO, N. D. 
NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 
FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



tion managements have grown close 
to the communities thev serve, these 
webs are in a position to do an un- 
usual job for an advertiser. 

Even with program costs down, it's 
still expensive, from an operational 
standpoint, to cover a market with in- 
dividual programs, station by station. 
A regional web can cover a section 
with a single program and one billing. 
Working closely with distributors and 
jobbers in getting distribution, in plac- 
ing point-of-sale material, etc., the ab- 
breviated network can deliver a maxi- 
mum of service to its advertisers. 

The regional chain may not in indi- 
vidual cases cover markets that corre- 
spond with exactly an advertiser's mar- 
ket divisions. But despite the trend 
toward tightly knit market coverage, a 
regional set-up permits the great flexi- 
bility of selective broadcasting on a 
broad area base. 

Few of the more than 50 area chains 
maintain big promotional staffs. In the 
majority of cases one man with the 
assistance of people at member sta- 
tions does the work. There are excep- 
tions, of course, and as it to be ex- 
pected webs like Yankee ( New Eng- 
land I . Don Lee ( Pacific Coast ) and 
West Coast segments of the four na- 



SPARTANBURG-GREENVILLE 
MARKET! 



AIR YOUR WARES OVER 




S PA* 



TANBU'Vi 



Represented By: ** 

John Blair & Company 

Harry E. Cummings * 

Southeastern Representative 

Roger A. Shaffer / 

Managing Director v 

Guy Vaughan, Jr., Sales Manager 



CBS Station For The 
Spartanburg-Greenville Market 



5,000 Watts -- 950 On Your Dial 

W SPA- AM and WSPA-FM Are Sold As 
A Single Service 



48 



SPONSOR 






Were £*Hyl 

All We Can Deliver Is 



of Texas 

(Population-wise and Dollar-wise) 

>/ 2 Millivolt Daytime 
Coverage 

~ Permanent Lines 
KCMC 




KFJZ (Key) 


Fort Worth 


1.270 Ke. 


5.000 W. 


MBS 


WRR 


Dallas 


1.310 " 


5.000 " 


MBS 


KRRV 


Sherman 


910 " 


1.000 " 


MBS 


KPLT 


Paris 


1.490 " 


250 " 


ABC 


KCMC 


Texarkana 


1.230 " 


250 " 


ABC 


KFRO 


Longview 


1.370 " 


1.000 " 


ABC 


KGVL 


Greenville 


1.400 " 


250 " 


MBS 


KRBC 


Abilene 


1,470 " 


5.000 " 


ABC 


KBWD 


Brownwood 


1.380 " 


1.000 " 


MBS 


KGKL 


San Angela 


960 " 


5.000 " 


ABC 


KBST 


Big Spring 


1.490 " 


250 " 


ABC 


KCRS 


Midland 


550 " 


5.000 " 


ABC 


KTHT 


Houston 


790 " 


5.000 " 


MBS 


WACO 


Waco 


1.460 " 


1.000 " 


ABC 


KNOW 


Austin 


1.490 " 


250 " 


ABC 


*KMAC 


San Antonio 


1.240 " 


250 " 


MBS 


*KABC 


San Antonio 


680 " 


50.000 " 


ABC 


KRIO 


McAllen 
> Station ^^_ 


910 " 


1.000 " 


MBS 


•Only one San Antenii 




to be used. 











TEXAS 



1201 W. Lancaster 



18 Stations 




250 Watts to 


50,000 Watt 


* 


. Vt Millivolt 


Daytime 


Coverage of 


90 % 


of 


Texas! 




NETWORK 



Fort Worth, Texas 



National Representatives 

Weed & Company 

New York • Detroit • Boston • Ch.cago 

Atlanta • Hollywood • San Fronf*'S 



18 JULY 1949 



49 



uism ... 



follow any UJUIII listener 
. . . to town 




THE KEY 

TO CONSUME 

PREFERENCE 



WSM 

NASHVILLE 



There are millions of WSM listeners, in a circle 
with many hundreds of miles radius. They are all 
kinds of people— urban, rural, rich and poor. 

Pick any family, or any hundred families— and 
follow them to town. Watch them buy. Then check 
what they have bought against the list of WSM 
sponsors— and you'll see what we mean when we 
talk about the exceptional pulling power of WSM. 

Then ask those families why they buy from the 
WSM list, why is it so definitely their shopping 
guide? The answer will be very simple. "We've 
been listening to WSM for a right long time, now, 
and we never have had cause to disbelieve any- 
thing we hear on it." Is there, anywhere, a more 
powerful background for selling? 



.WSMi 



tional nets are among those who tell 
their stories elaborately and often. 

Beyond the extra service regional 
chains are in a position to render ad- 
vertisers, they form an important test- 
ing ground for both products and new 
programs and commericial techniques. 
A variation on this theme is being de- 
veloped in Oklahoma by the Oklahoma 
Group Broadcasters, and in Alabama 
by Associated Broadcasting Service 
(see No Telephone Lines, SPONSOR 4 
July 1949, p. 30 1 . 

In these operations key FM stations, 
KOCY-FM, Oklahoma City, and 
WBRC-FM. Birmingham, feed regular 
programs and special events to groups 
of AM affiliates via FM relay. Under 
the ABS arrangement affiliates take 17 
hours of WBRC I AM I programing 
daily, more than half of which is live. 
An advertiser can buy various blocks 
of the 24 affiliated local AM stations. 
Most of them are low-powered and 
they cover the length and breadth of 
Alabama. The case is similar with 
OGB. and one check to the network 
takes care of the bookkeeping. 

Both nets make sports events, top 
regional and local sports, available to 
affiliates that on their own could not 
afford them, or to whom the events 



FALL AND WINTER 

SCHEDULES 

NEED 



w 

T 



R 



AM-FM 



F 



HARRY STONE, Gen. Mgr. • IRVING WAUGH. Com. Mgr. • EDWARD PETRY & CO., Notional Rep. 
30,009 WATTS • CLEAR CHANNEL • 650 KILOCYCLES • NBC AFFILIATE 



Covering the 

Prosperous 

Greater Wheeling 

Market From 
BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Represented by 

THE WALKER COMPANY 



50 



SPONSOR 



selectiv 



Network Programs Available on Loeal Mai ions 



TTLE 


TYPE 


NET 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE 


EXPLANATION 


MARTIN AGRONSKY 


News 


ABC 


Adult 


15-min, 6/wk 


$6-$336 


Early morning news commentary from Washington 


ALEXANDER'S MEDIATION BOARD 


Drama 


MBS 


Adult 


30-min, 1 /wk 


$5 $500 


Advice on listener problems 


AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR 


Forum 


MBS 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


$3-$300 


Authorities debate subjects of national interest 


AMERICA'S TOWN MEETING 


Forum 


ABC 


Adult 


60-min, 1/wk 


J7.60-$360 


lively discussions of vital issues 


BAUKHAGE TALKING 


News 


ABC 


A^ult 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5 $280 


News reports and commentary from Washington 


BREAKFAST IN HOLLYWOOD 


Aud Part 


ABC 


Family 


30-min, 5/wk 


$'.! $«00 


1 nil at the rreakfast table with Jack McElroy as MC 


CECIL BROWN 


News 


MBS 


Familv 


15-min, 5/wk 


$6-$350 


Commentary on domestic and foreign events 


CAPTAIN MIDNIGHT 


Drama 


MBS 


Juvenile 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$280 


Daytime serial thriller 


NANCY CRAIG 


Commentary 


APC 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$280 


Chatty, informal interviews with guests 


BILL CUNNINGHAM 


News 


MBS 


Family 


15-min, 1 /wk 


$2.50-$ 140 


Veteran reporter's comment on inside of news 


ELMER DAVIS 


News 


ABC 


Adult 


15-min, 5/wk 


$7.5O-$420 


Reports and Commentary from Washington 


DOROTHY DIX 


Commentary 


ABC 


Adult 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$240 


Counsel on human relations problems 


FINAL EDITION 


News 


NBC 


Familv 


15-min, 3 wk 


$6-$168 


Late news with Morgan Beatty and Leon Pearson 


FISHING AND HUNTING CLUB 


Sports 


MBS 


Family 


25-min, 1/wk 


$5-$280 


Advice, tips, prizes to fishers and hunters 


CEDRIC FOSTER 


News 


MBS 


Familv 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5 $280 


Domestic and foreign news commentary 


PAULINE FREDERICK REPORTS 


News 


ABC 


Adult 


10-min, 5/wk 


$5-$ 180 


Only woman news reporter in network radio 


HARKNESS 


News 


NBC 


Familv 


15-min, 2/wk 


$10-$266 


Analysis of national scene from Washington 


HEADLINE EDITION 


News 


ABC 


Adult 


10-min, 5/wk 


$6-$280 


News and interviews with people who make the news 


GABRIEL HEATTER'S MAILBAG 


Commentary 


MBS 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


$7.50-$560 


Heatter discusses his fan mail 


GEORGE HICKS 


News 


NBC 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


$10- $270 


Hicks replaces McCormick; reports on world events 


INSIDE OF SPORTS 


Sports 


MBS 


Men 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$280 


Behind locker doors from coast to coast 


JOHNSON FAMILY 


Drama 


MBS 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$250 


Love, life, laughter with the Johnsons 


IRENE & ALLAN JONES 


Mr. and Mrs. 


ABC 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


$6-$300 


About their travels: taped in faraway places 


KALTENBORN 


News 


NBC 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


$10-1400 


1 'momentary by dean of radio correspondents 


HENRY LACOSSITT 


News 


MBS 


Adult 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$250 


Anecdotes, stories, news on the unusual side 


FULTON LEWIS JR 


News 


MBS 


AHult 


15-min, 5/wk 


$6-$560 


Comments on day's developments from Washington 


LUNCHEON AT SARDI'S 


Interview 


MBS 


Adult 


30-min, 5/wk 


$B-$560 


Man-on-the-street in a restaurant 


MEET THE PRESS 


News 


MBS 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$5-$280 


Air press conference with names in news 


MR. PRESIDENT 


Drama 


ABC 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$7.5O-$360 


Edward Arnold in true episodes in lives of Presidents 


MUTUAL NEWSREEL 


News 


MBS 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$500 


Pickups and interviews from coast Ui coast 


JOHNNESBITT 


Commentary 


MBS 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


$7.50-$56C 


Odd and unusual stories of people, places, things 


NEWS OF AMERICA 


News 


CBS 


Family 


15-min, 6/wk 


$2-$324* 


What's happening in the 48 states 


PIANO PLAYHOUSE 


Musical 


ABC 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4 $120 


Outstanding piano virtuosi and Milton Cross 


KATE SMITH SPEAKS 


Commentary 


MBS 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$7.5O-$1000 


Coverng women's angle on variety of topics 


GEORGE SOKOLSKY 


Commentary 


ABC 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


$4*120 


Comment on topics of contemporary interest 


TELL YOUR NEIGHBOR 


Commentary 


MBS 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$280 


Over-the-back-fence stories, household hints 


THIS IS PARIS 


Variety- 


MBS 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$3-$ 1000 


Maurice Chevalier, European stars taped in Paris 


HARRY WISMER 


Sports 


ABC 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$3-$84 


Comment on week's major sports events 


WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP 


News 


CBS 


Family 


15-min, 6/wk* 


$2-$324 


Remote pickups, domestic and foreign 


WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP 


News 


NBC 


Family 


15-min, 6/wk 


$12 $280 


John McVane from Washington 


WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP 


News 


NBC 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


$M56 


James Fleming with Sunday edition 


WORLD TONIGHT 


News 


CBS 


Family 


15-min, 7/wk* 


$2-$324 


Richard C. Hottelet summarizes world news 



Network TV Available on Local Stations 



AMERICAN MINSTRELS 


Minstrel 


ABC 


Family 


1-hr, 1/wk 


$115-$1500 


Traditional minstrel style 


CHICAGO WRESTLING MATCHES 


Sports 


ABC 


Family 


2-hrs, 1/wk 


$S0-$600 


Professional wrestling from Chicago's Rainbo Arena 


HOLLYWOOD SCREEN TEST 


Drama 


ABC 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$67.50-$675 


Screen tests for talented young artists 


SMALL FRY 


Melange 


Du Mont 


Juvenile 


30-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Traditional "Uncle Don" stuff 


TOMORROW'S CHAMPIONS 


Sports 


ABC 


Family 


2-hrs, 1/wk 


$37.50- $375 


Amateur boxing bouts from Chicago's Rainbo Arena 



♦Estimated by SPONSOR 

18 JULY 1949 



51 



wouldn't be available for other reasons. 
The network also gets from the key 
stations (programed in each case by 
the AM parent station I popular re- 
gional talent and programs, including 
regional news coverage. 

It is to be expected that similar AM- 
FM regional operations will develop 
to give advertisers new opportunities 
for flexible, economical coverage of 
areas where they need either a pick-up 
or to maintain consistent pressure. 

Still another variation on the re- 
gional theme is the per-occasion, or 



custom-built, network. They are most 
productive for special occasion broad- 
casts of intense interest to listeners of 
an area. Their main justification is 
the difficulty of lining up for one occa- 
sion regular network stations with 
established commitments. They are re- 
latively expensive, but results for cer- 
tain regional types of business, such 
as breweries, gas and oil, etc., have 
more than justified the cost of setting 
them up. The actual task of setting up 
the net is not difficult for an agency ac- 
quainted with the problems involved. 



WSBT 



—and only WSBT 



— commands the 



South Bend audience 



Sure, people can hear other stations in South 
Bend hut they listen to WSBT. This station 
has won its audience through more than 27 
years of personalized service to this market. 
It gives listeners what they want when they 
want it. This is why the ever-growing WSBT 
audience remains loyal year after year, Hooper 
after Hooper. No other station even comes 
close in Share of Audience. 




5000 WATTS • 960 KC 



CBS 



It is with sports that these nets are 
most effective, since the right events 
can actually guarantee an audience 
whose minimum total can be fairly 
well predicted. Yet sports weren't the 
first events for which special nets were 
put together. Pioneer in building the 
special chains is Stanley G. Boynton. 
Detroit. The agency that bears his 
name organized the first special webs 
for Sunday morning religious broad- 
casts when several years ago all 
major chains but Mutual dropped com- 
mercial religious broadcasts. 

Discovering how productive these 
specially assembled nets could be, 
Boynton moved into the most obvious 
field for the custom-built network, 
sports. 

Listening appeals of football, base- 
ball, etc.. vary with each event under 
a variety of conditions. The vast ma- 
jority of all such events have only a 
local or a regional interest. Practical- 
ly every football clash appeals to a 
different audience. Therefore, to keep 
reaching maximum audiences a spon- 
sor must during the season keep chang- 
ing his network line-up from week to 
week. 

[Please turn to page 76) 



m 



"AMERICA'S FINEST 
WESTERN ACT"! 




PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
52 



The Texas Rangers, America's 
greatest western act, for many 
years stars of radio, screen and 
stage, now are starring in their 
own television show on CBS- 
Los Angeles Times station 
KTTV each Monday evening. 

The Texas Rangers transcrip- 
tions, used on scores of stations 
from coast to coast, have 
achieved Hooperatings as high 
as 27.4. 

Advertisers and stations — we 
have a new and even better 
sales plan! Ask about it! 

ARTHUR B. CHURCH Productions 
KANSAS CITY 6, MISSOURI 



SPONSOR 



T 




j how do we measure up at 

Ori 1 Dancer -Fitzgerald -Sample 

OR AT SHERMAN & MARQUETTE? 



sponsor gives you exactly what you need for trade paper 
advertising value. Its purpose is simple: a magazine 100% devoted to the 
interests of broadcast advertising buyers in the national field. 
Its circulation is pinpointed: 3 out of every 4 copies (8,000 guarantee) 
go to buyers. Its prestige is potent because it's a sound, easy-to-take, use 
magazine. Ask any timebuyer, or your own national representative. 






"It's a grand magazine for keeping abreast of what's 
new and vital in the field. Particularly useful to 
me is the Comparagraph, most interesting are the 
grass-roots descriptions of how a client starts, builds, 
and grows through the use of radio." 

STANLEY PULVER, 
Timebuyer, 
Dancer-Fitzge raid-Sample 

•tanSMMB 



Dancer-F 

Subscription; 
Home 



An average of 10% paid subscriptions go to readers at each of the 
20 top radio-billing advertising agencies. 

"sponsor is given careful reading each issue by 
most of our key personnel. Moreover, it contains 
much information which is of permanent reference 
value." 

LOU TILDEN, 
Radio Director, 
Sherman & Marquette 



Executives 
Acct Ejecs 
Radio o 



You're sure to hit home wi 

when 



rquette 
PONSOR 




its who sub- 
Quaker Oats. 



i sponsors and agencies 
you advertise in SPONSOR 



SPONSOR 



For buyers of Radio and TV advertising 
40 West 52 Street, New York 19 



18 JULY 1949 



53 






It's a 
happy 

marriage! 




54 



SPONSOR 






T 




APPY for you. Now you can be sure of selling virtually the entire south- 
eastern United States, without ever leaving your desk. And without 
paying for expensive extra coverage you don't need. 

Because, for the first time, the two giants of the southeast — 50,000-watt 
WRVA in Richmond and 50,000-watt WBT in Charlotte— have combined 
for a joint broadcast every Saturday night of the South' s famed 
OLD DOMINION BARN DANCE ... a giant of a program! 
It's a perfect marriage! 

On WRVA, BARN DANCE (10:00-10:30 PM) has an 11.7 Hooperating*-a 
33% bigger rating than a big-name comedian on the second station. Moving 
into the 10:00 PM period on WBT, it follows a four-hour lineup of programs 
already Hooperated at an average 16.3** — a 101% higher average than 
any other station and 28% higher than ALL other stations combined. 
It's a wealthy marriage! 

The combined 50-100% BMB nighttime area of WRVA and WBT totals 193 
counties in six states, with retail sales of more than $3,400,000,000f 
... a dowry well worth our time — and yours! 
It's a marriage of convenience! 

Your convenience. Available as a half-hour package or in 
quarter-hour segments, BARN DANCE can be sponsored on WRVA 
and WBT at blissfully low cost. For your convenience, one call to 
either station or the nearest Radio Sales office will provide complete 
lIP; information . . . and a contract. 



WBT 

CHARLOTTE, 

NORTH 

CAROLINA 



WRVA 

RICHMOND 
and NORFOLK, 
VIRGINIA 



*Richmond, Oct. 1948-Feb. 1949- **Cbarlotte, Oct. 1948-Feb. 1949 
\Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, May 1949. 



18 JULY 1949 



55 




Syndicated Transcription Availibilities 



NAME 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE PER EPISODE 


PRODUCERS EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER 


A CHRISTMAS CAROL 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 time 


$12.50 minimum 


Famous Dickens story starring Tom Terriss 


Kasper-Gordon 


A DATE WITH MUSIC 


Musical 


Familj 


15-min, 3 5 wk 


$5 minimum 


Musical revue with Phil Brito 


Charles Michelson 


ADDISON PELLETIER SHOW 


Narrative 


Women 


15-min, 1 wk 


$5 minimum 


Unusual stories and experiences 


lvasper-Gordon 


ADVENTURES IN XMAS TREE GROVE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5. wk 


S5 minimum 


The Santa Claus family and friends 


Kasper-Gordon 


ADVENTURES OF BUDDY BEAR 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1 wk 


$5 minimum 


Childrens' adventure stories 


Kasper-Gordon 


ADVENTURES OF DR. KILDARE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


The popular MGM movie series 


MGM Radio 


ADVENTURES OF FRANK FARRELL 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1-5 /wk 


On request 


Juvenile and teenage sports stories 


Russell C. Comer 


ADVENTURES OF FRANK RACE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery-adventure around the world 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


ADVENTURES OF PINOCCHIO 


Fantasy 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1-5 /wk 


Basel on mkt 


Scripts adapted from the famous book 


Edward Sloman Prodns 


ADVENTURES OF ZORRO 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Adaptation of the Johnson McCully stories 


Bob Davey 


AIR ADVENTURES OF JIMMIE ALLEN 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Story of 17-year-old airplane pilot 


Russell C. Comer 


AIRMAIL MYSTERY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery drama with airmail background 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


ALBUM OF LIFE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Dramatic vignettes of love, mystery, adventure 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


ALLEN PRESCOTT-THE WIFE SAVER 


Variety 


Women 


15-min, 3/wk 


$4.50 $51 


Household hints flavored with laughs 


NBC Radio-Recording 


ALL STAR WESTERN THEATRE 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, I/wk 


$10-$300 


Western stories and music with Foy Willing 


Harry S. Goodman 


ANYTHING FOR LAUGHS 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, fi/wk 


On request 


Peter Donald's amusing dialect stories 


Ray Green 


ARMCHAIR ROMANCES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Historical, mystical, romantic drama sketches 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


AT HOME WITH LIONEL BARRYMORE 


Talk 


Family 


51-min, 3/wk 


On request 


Famous actor in anecdotes, memoirs, philosophy 


MGM Radio 


AT THE OPERA 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


A review of great operatic music 


Associated Prog Serv 


AUNT MARY 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$5-$50 


Small-town woman's struggle for human dignity 


NBC Radio-Recording 


AVENGER, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


$10 minimum 


Unusual approach to detective stories 


Charles Michelson 


BABY DAYS 


Talk 


Women 


15-min, 1-2 /wk 


$4-$50 


Dr. D. S. DeLoya discusses child care 


Harry S. Goodman 


BAND CONCERT 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$0 minimum 


Music by famous English service lands 


Kasper-Gordon 


BARBERSHOP HARMONIES 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 6/wk 


$4-$40 


Nostalgic songs by top barbershop singers 


Richard H. UUman 


BARNYARD JAMBOREE 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$5-$150 


Hillbilly music and comedy 


Teleways 


BEHIND THE SCENES 


Narrative 


Family 


5-min, 5/wk 


25% class-A 


Human-interest stories, starring Knox Manning 


Universal 


BETTY AND BOB 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$3.50-$20 


Human-interest serial drama 


NBC Radio-Recording 


BEULAH KARNEY'S MEAL OF THE DAY 


Talk 


Women 


5-min, 5/wk 


$8-$25 


What to eat each day in the year 


William J. Powers 


BITS OF LIFE 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Series specializing in character study 


Charles Michelson 


BLAIR OF THE MOUNTIES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


$3-$ 15 


Stories of the Northwest Mounted Police 


Walter Biddick 


BOD'S SCRAPBOOK 


Talk 


Family 


15-min, 1-5 /wk 


On request 


Wit, wisdom, friendly philosophy 


Dominion 


BOSTON BLACKIE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


Based on mkt 


Mystery-adventure, starring Richard Kollmar 


Frederic W. Ziv 


BOX 13 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


$7.50-$300 


Screen star Alan Ladd in mystery-adventures 


Mayfair 


CALLING ALL GIRLS 


Variety 


Women 


15-min, 3-5 /wk 


Based on mkt 


Feminine chatter, fashions 


Freieric W. Ziv 


CAN YOU IMAGINE THAT? 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Dramatization of unusual facts 


BroaJcasters Prog Synd 


CAPTAIN DANGER 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3/wk 


25% class-A 


Adventure serial for children 


Universal 


CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


True-life dramatizations of industrial pioneers 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


CAPT STUBBY AND THE BUCCANEERS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Rollicking humor, antics, and novelty tunes 


Broadcasters' Guild 


CAREER OF ALICE BLAIR 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Serial of ambitious girl 


Fre 'eric W. Ziv 


CARSON ROBINSON AND BUCKAROOS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$5-$31.00 


Western music and entertainment 


NBC Radio-Recording 


CAVALCADE OF MUSIC 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Large orchestra, chorus; name guest stars 


Lang-Worth 


CHUCK WAGON JAMBOREE 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


$3.5O-$40 


Western-type show, starring Ken Curtis 


Teleways 


CISCO KID 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Drama, mystery, adventure in the old West 


Frederic W. Ziv 


CLIFF EDWARDS SHOW 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5-6 /wk 


O.R.F.S. 


I'kelele Ike doing the songs that made him famous 


Broadcasters' Guild 


COME AND GET IT 


Aud partic 


Women 


15-min, 3/wk 


$3.50-$50 


Radio's original food quiz and commentary 


NBC Radio-Recording 


COMEDY CAPERS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Musical revue with 16-piece orchestra, Bob Burns 


Broa lcasters Prog Synd 


COUNTRY CHURCH OF HOLLYWOOD 


Talk 


Adult 


15-min, 5/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Home-spun wisdom by pastor Josiah Hopkins 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


CRIME DOES NOT PAY 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Adaptations of MGM prize-winning two-reelers 


MGM Radio 


THE CRIMSON TRAIL 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


25% M hr class A 


Story of the building of Canadian Pacific R.R. 


C. P. MacGregor 


CANDLELIGHT AND SILVER 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 8 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


A favorite dinner-music program 


Associated Prog Serv 


CURTAIN CALLS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Great moments of opening nights on Broadway 


Associated Prog Serv 


CURTAIN OF TIME 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


On request 


Dramatic narrations of little-known incidents 


Mayfair 


DAMON RUNYON THEATRE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


$9.40-$500 


Runyon's most popular stories dramatized 


Mayfair 


DAN DUNN, SECRET OPERATIVE #48 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


$5 minimum 


Juvenile series based on cartoon-strip hero 


Kasper-Gordon 


DANGER, DOCTOR DANFIELD 


Dram;! 


I amih 


30-min, 1 wk 


$7.50-$300 


Murders solved by psychology and deduction 


Teleways 



O.R.F.S. — on request from station. 



56 



SPONSOR 



Months Ago We Said 



an 




tmm 



re BUILT TO BE SOLD 77 




W""S0LD STAR SHOWS 
FOR THREE TIMES 
LIBRARY COST!" 

"Programs sold within the first few weeks after 
we received our audition discs and literature 
have already paid for the entire cost of the 
Standard Program Library three times over!" 

W^"CAME JUST AT THE 
RIGHT TIME!" 

"The Standard Star Shows were timed just 
right. They are selling time for us just when we 
need sales most. We have had the Star Show 
material just a week now, and have already 
sold two shows!" 

^"SELLING TIME FOR US- 
MOVIHG GOODS FOR THE 

OrUNoUH! "Standard Star Shows are 
just what we've been looking for! From the 
sales angle they are terrific; from the listening 
angle, they are even more so. Our sponsors for 
these shows range from a hardware store to a 
•taxi stand— and all agree that Standard Star 
Shows have a powerful selling punch!" 



. . . and today when 
sales ate needed most 




Names in our files; fur- 
nished on request. 



• HOLLYWOOD CALLING 

• MUSIC IN THE MODERN 
MOOD 

• PERSONALITY TIME 

• MEET THE BAND 

• 20 TH CENTURY 
SERENADE 



"BEST THIHG STAHDARD^ 
HAS EVER DOME!" 

" 'Meet the Band' audition discs arrived noon 
today and we have already sold the series. It's 
a great show— and so are the others. This is 
the best thing Standard has ever done!" 

'SOLD ACROSS THE BOARD!' ^d 

"It might be of interest to you to know that 
we have already sold 'Personality Time' across 
the board to an automobile dealer. Looks like 
we're going to do a real selling job with 
Standard Star Shows!" 



WRITE FOR FREE PRESENTATION 
AND AUDITION DISC 



tjTtiv 



sww< 




TRANSCRIPTION SERVICES, INC. 
Hollywood • Chicago • New York 



A II c»_*: 



«- .u_ Ci 



._l i n l :l 




EARL L. SAUNDERS, agency V.P., on SINGIN' SAM . . . 

"We have had this department store on the air con- 
tinuously for over twelve years, using various types of 
programs, and our client is highly pleased with results 
from "Singin' Sam." The show seems to fit in with 
practically every type of listener, which certainly is 
the ideal setup for any advertiser." 



Fred Allen 



"What do you think 

of television, Mr. Allen?" 

July 4, 1949 



"There's something about the television screen 
that prevents the close, personal contact 
between the actor and the audience that you 
had in radio — the kind of familiar connection 
with the listener that Tony Wons and SINGIN' 
SAM were able to establish." 



R. L. LANG, druggist, on SINGIN' SAM . . . 

"Since I have been airing "Reminiscin' With 
Singin' Sam" my business has shown a big 
increase. Prescription business has more than 
doubled and all departments in my store are 
doing better than ever before." 



BRO MINGUS, commercial manager, on SINGIN' SAM . . . 

"Prior to placing 'Singin' Sam' on KRBC at 6:45 to 
7:00 each evening we were scheduling a newscast at 
that period. The Robert S. Conlan survey showed the 
news broadcast with a rating of 7.8. The last Conlan 
survey showed that 'Singin' Sam' in the same 6:45 
slot had a rating of 18.2." 



SALES 

SINGIN' SAM... An American Institution 

Entertainers like Singin' Sam happen along once in a generation. And when they do you know you've 
got something. For there's a homey, down-to-earth, irresistibly friendly quality to this reminiscing 
Hoosier that reaches the listener all the way from his heart to his pocketbook. Sam is best known for 
his Barbasol and Coca Cola successes, but he's sold everything from lawn mowers to peanuts with 
striking results. Two hundred sixty (260) high quality 1 5-minute transcriptions are available. 



WRITE, WIRE, OR 



I 



on SINGIN' SAM . . . 




What's the magic that brought 

this homespun Hoosier to the pinnacle 

of success in radio? There's been many an 

argument about that . . . but never about his ability to 

produce for his diversified sponsors. Ask us for his sales experiences 

in any of the retail classifications. We'll be glad to send you the record. 



SOME OF SINGIN' SAM'S HUNDREDS 
OF REGIONAL AND LOCAL 
SPONSORS 



Ccirolino Beverage Sales 

(soft drinks) 

Davison-Paxton Co. (department 
store) 

Kamm Brewing Co. (brewery) 

National Stores (food stores) 

Rhodes Furniture Co. 

(furniture store) 

Evans Cut Rate Drugs (drug 

stores) 

The Jewel Box (jewelry store) 

Grasso Shoe Co. (shoe store) 

Republic Oil Co. (gas and oil) 

Twin Falls Motor Co. (auto 
dealer) 

Nelson Hardware (hardware 
store) 

State Laundry Co. (laundry) 

Cloverleaf Dairy (dairy) 

Nickles Bakeries (bakery) 

Folger Coffee Co. (coffee) 

Durkie Foods Co. (food 
processors) 

Mathis Construction Co. 

( building ) 

Valley Butane Co. (public utility) 

Home Insurance Agency 

(insurance) 

Henry Radio Service 

(appliances) 

Vicks Chemical Co. (drugs) 

Interstate Theaters Corp. 

(theaters) 

McFarland Smplem3nt Co. (farm 
implements) 



PHONE . . . 



TRANSCRIPTION 

117 West High St., 

New York • Chicago 


SALES, INC. 

Springfield, Ohio 
• Hollywood 



elective 



NAME 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE PER EPISODE 


PRODUCERS' EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER 


DAREDEVILS OF HOLLYWOOD 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 2/wk 


$3-$15 


Dramatized scenes of thrilling Hollywood films 


Walter Biddick 


DEAREST MOTHER 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Dramatic serial specifically designed for women 


Frederic W. Ziv 


DEERSLAYER, THE 


Urania 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Fenimore Cooper's virile tales of Colonial wars 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


DESTINY TRAILS 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3/wk 


I3.50-J50 


Authentic adaptations of Cooper's stories 


NBC Radio Recording 


DICK COLE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30-min, 1/wk 


$7.50 minimum 


Military-academy life dramatized for children 


Charles Michelson 


DIME » RIME 


Aud partic 


Adult 


15 or 30 min 


On request 


Laughs and mounting interest via prizes 


Transcription Sales 


DOCTOR'S ORDERS 


Talk 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


$4-$80 


Authentic series on modern medicine 


Radio Providence 
Prodns 


DREAM WEAVER, THE 


Talk 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


$4 minimum 


Down-to-earth prose and expressive poetry 


Transcription Sales 


EASY ACES 


Comedy 


Family 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Jane and Goodie Ace in the long-time hit 


Frederic W . Ziv 


EAT-ITORIALLY SPEAKING 


Talk 


Women 


15-min, 1/wk 


$4 minimum 


Food show with Dickman Stone 


Kasper-Gordon 


EDGAR WALLACE 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Thrilling intrigue stories 


S. W. Caldwell 


FACT OR FANTASY 


Drama 


Adult 


5-min, 2-6 wk 


On request 


Weird stories of mental and psychic phenomena 


Charlie Basch 


FAIRYTALES 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


25% Yt hr class A 


Dramatizations of world-famous fairytales 


C. P. MacGregor 


FAMILY ALBUM, THE 


Musical 


Fam ily 


15-min, 1 /wk 


$6 minimum 


Pictures in family all/Urn recall favorite songs 


Kasper-Gordon 


FAMILY DOCTOR, THE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


True-to-life stories about a family doctor 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FAMOUS ROMANCES 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


History's greatest lovers relive their romances 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FAVORITE STORY 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


Based on mkt 


Ronald Colman in a brilliant dramatic program 


Frederic W. Ziv 


FIREFIGHTERS 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


On request 


True adventures of a big-city fire department 


W. F. Holland 


FIVE-MINUTE MYSTERIES 


Drama 


Family 


5-min, 2/wk 


$1.40-120 


Complete mysteries in five-minute packages 


NBC Radio-Recording 


FRANK PARKER SHOW 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


$4-$50 


Musical variety show featuring name talent 


Teleways 


FRONTIER FIGHTERS 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Exploits of men who built America's frontiers 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FRONTIER TOWN 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Radio's answer to grade-A Western movies 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FRONT PAGE HEADLINES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Dramas about the newspaper world 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FUN FEST 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


A olend of fast comedy and popular music 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


FUN WITH MUSIC 


Musical 


F'amily 


15-min, 1/wk 


$5 minimum 


Program stars Sigmund Spaeth, tune detective 


Kasper-Gordon 


FURS ON PARADE 


Talk 


Women 


15-min, 1 'wk 


$4 minimum 


Interview-type program for promotion of furs 


Kasper-Gordon 


GENERAL STORE, THE 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Down-to-earth show with warm, rural humor 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


GETTING MOST OUT OF LIFE TODAY 


Inspirational 


Adult 


5-min, optional 


$1.20-$16 


Down-to-earth inspirational talks 


NBC Radio Recording 


GHOST CORPS, THE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery drama laid in the Near and Far East 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


GLORIA CARROLL ENTERTAINS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$6 minimum 


Program stars Gloria Carroll, Frank Bell, Belltones 


Kasper-Gordon 


GOLF DOCTOR, THE 


Sports 


F'amily 


15-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Golf instruction , plus comedy from name stars 


Lowe Features 


GOOD NEWS FROM HOLLYWOOD 


News 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


On request 


Hollywood news, gossip, with George Murphy, guests 


MGM Radio 


GREEN JOKER, THE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery stories based on actual fact 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


GREEN VALLEY LINES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 2/wk 


$3$ 15 


Story of Green Valley Railroad's tribulations 


Walter Biddick 


GUESS WHAT? 


Quiz 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Novel, unique quiz program for all ages 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


GUILTY OR NOT GUILTY 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Court-room dramas, with audience as jury 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


GUY LOMBARDO SHOW 


Musical 


F'amily 


30-min, 1/wk 


Based on mkt 


"The sweetest music this side of Heaven" 


Frederic W. Ziv 


HAPPY THE HUMBUG 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3/wk 


$4.9O-$70 


Whimsical adventures in the world of make-believe 


NBC Radio Recording 


HAPPY VALLEY FOLKS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Actual mountaineers singing hillbilly songs 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


HARMONY ISLE 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 2/wk 


$3$ 15 


Singing and playing of Hawaiian music 


Walter Biddick 


HAUNTING HOUR, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


$7$ 100 


Original psychological mystery thrillers 


NBC Radio Recording 


HAWAIIAN FANTASIES 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Native Hawaiian band and singers 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


HEART SONGS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Kenny Baker, Nadine Connor, quartette 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


HENRY KING SHOW 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


25% }-2 hr class A 


King orchestra and guest stars 


C. P. MacGregor 


HI SPORTS 


Sports 


Adult 


5-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Stan Lomax interviews big names in sports 


Affiliated Prog Serv 


HISTORY IN THE MAKING 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$6 minimum 


Dramatizations of important historical events 


Kasper-Gordon 


HOLLAND ENGLE SHOW 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


On request 


Complete variety of musical numbers 


Broadcasters' Guild 


HOLLYWOOD CALLING 


Musical 


Women 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Music from films; interviews with stars 


Standard 


HOLLYWOOD CASTING OFFICE 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Fast-moving comedy revue with Hollywood atmosphere 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


HOLLYWOOD'S OPEN HOUSE 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, 1 /wk 


On request 


Variety show with Ray Bloch orchestra, Jim Ameche 


Ray Green 


HOLLYWOOD SOUND STAGE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


25% class A • •.. hr 


Love, romance, adventure in film capital 


C. P. MacGregor 


HOLLYWOOD SPOTLIGHT 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Bob Burns, Martha Raye, Phil Harris, and others 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


HOLLYWOOD THEATRE OF STARS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


50% class A Yi hr 


Network caliber show with Hollywood names 


C. P. MacGregor 


HOLLYWOOD, USA. 


Interviews 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Paul Stone interviews film names 


MGM Radio 


HOMETOWNERS, THE 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$4-$90 


All types of music by Earl Randall, Betty Bennett 


Morton Radio Prodns 


HOME, SWEET HOME 


Drama 


Family 


5-min, 5 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Typical family living in an average town 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


H0PAL0N6 CASSIDY 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1-2 ,wk 


On request 


William Boyd in his famous movie role 


Commodore Prodns 


HOUSE IN THE COUNTRY 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, lwk 


$12.50-$275 


Situation comedy alwut city couple gone rural 


NBC Radio Recording 



O.R.F.S. — on request from station. 

.60 



SPONSOR 




The Program 



"JIM AMECHE-STORYTELLER ... 260 15-minute OPEN-END transcribed 
programs. Absorbing, educational and true-to-life stories based on little known facts in the lives of the 
world's most well-known people. 



The Star 



JIM AMECHE . . . Prominent in radio since 1933, JIM AMECHE has appeared 
in more than 11,000 radio shows! He has starred in countless high-Hooper shows including "Lux Radio Theatre," 
"Grand Hotel," "Mercury Theater," "Grand Marquee," and "Welcome Traveler." The dramatic personality 
his voice transmits has created a permanent niche in the high-Hooper hall of fame for the personable 



Jim Ameche. 

FOR 



f** 



AUDITION RECORD: 




-trviWLy S. Cf^roxJ trvccsTL- 



19 EAST 53rd STREET 



RADIO PRODUCTIONS 



NEW YORK. N. Y. 



18 JULY 1949 



61 






lective 



NAME 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME PRICE PER EPISODE PRODUCERS' EXPLANATION PRODUCER 


HYMNS OF THE WORLD 


Religious 


Family 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


$5-$175 


Dignified program of sacred hymns of all faiths 


Teleways 


HYMN TIME 


Religious 


Family 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


$3.75 minimum 


Smilin' Kd McConnell in inspirational songs, talk 


Charles Michelson 


IMPERIAL LEADER 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


$ri minimum 


Dramatization of the life of Winston Churchill 


Rasper-Gordon 


INCREDIBLE, BUT TRUE 


Drama 


Family 


15-mir, 1-5 wk 


$2-$50 


Unusual phenomena which cannot be cxphiinr 1 


Unusual Features S 


MUSIC FROM HOLLYWOOD & VINE 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


$7.50-% class-A 


Roy Bargy's orchestra, song stvlist Jcannie McK.eon 


Selected Radio Features 


MUSIC IN THE MODERN MOOD 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Popular concert arrangements of standard Bongs 


Standard Radio Trans 
Serv 


MUSICAL COMEDY THEATRE THE 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$15 mimmum 


Well-known musical comedies and light operettas 


Charles Michelson 


MUSICAL ROUNDUP 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


On request 


Western, hillbilly, and folk siniing and playing 


Standard Ralio Trans 
Serv 


MY PRAYER WAS ANSWERED 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1-3-5 wk 


$5 minimum 


True stories of how prayer helped people 


Charles Michelson 


MYSTERY CHEF, THE 


Talk 


\\ omen 


15-min, 1-5 wk 


$2.50-$40 


How to eat well and at the same time cheaply 


Harry S. Goodman 


MYSTERY HOUSE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$10-$300 


All-star whodunit; each story complete 


Harry S. Goodman 


NAME YOU WILL REMEMBER, THE 


Talk 


Family 


5-min, 3 wk 


$1.20-$16 


\\ ord-portraits of notables in the news 


NBC Radio Recording 


NEMESIS, INC. 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Clever feminine-detective series 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


NEW ADVENTURES OF MICHAEL 
SHAYNE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$7.50-$300 


Mystery, excitement, suspense, but no gore 


Broadcasters' Guil I 


NICKEL-A-NAME 


Aul partic 


Adult 


15-30-min 


On request 


Fast-moving audience participation show 


Transcription Sales 


NILL AND NULL 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, optional 


O.R.F.S. 


Capsules featuring a fast-talking comedy team 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


NONSENSE AND MELODY 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Comedy review embodying a trip around the world 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


OBSESSION 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


50'r c class-A !4-hr 


Psychological dramatic program 


C. P. MacGregor 


OLD CORRAL 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


Based on mkt 


Western variety musical with Pappy Chesire 


Frederic W. Ziv 


ONE FOR THE BOOK 


Sports 


Men 


5-15-min, 3-5 wk 


Eased on mkt 


Real-life sports adventures told by Sam Baiter 


Frederic W. Ziv 


ONE I'LL NEVER FORGET 


Sports 


Men 


5-min, 2-3-5 /wk 


$2 minimum 


Jack Stevens tells unusual, unknown sports tales 


Kasper-Gordon 


ORIGIN OF SUPERSTITIONS 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


The truth about popular superstitious beliefs 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


OUTDOOR LIFE TIME 


Sports 


Men 


15-min, 1 /wk 


$7-$125 


Stories, advice on fishing, hunting, camping, etc. 


Harry S. Gooiman 


PAPPY SMITH & HIS HIRED HANDS 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$fi minimum 


Music, down-to-earth comedy, philosophy 


SESAC 


PARENTS' MAGAZINE OF THE AIR 


Talk 


Adult 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


Based on mkt 


Advice on rearing children from crib to college 


Fre Uric W. Ziv 


PAT O'BRIEN FROM HOLLYWOOD 


Variety 


F'amily 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Dramatized narration by screen star Pat O'Brien 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


PERSONALITY TIME 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


On request 


Name vocal, instrumental, and acting talent 


Standard Radio Trans 
Serv 


PHILO VANCE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


Based on mkt 


S. S. Van Dine's sophisticated detective 


Frederic W. Ziv 


PINTO PETE AND HIS RANCH BOYS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Songs of the Western range 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


PINTO PETE IN ARIZONA 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Western folk music and ph ilosophy 


Broadcasters EVog Synd 


PLAYHOUSE OF FAVORITES 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$9-$200 


Vivid dramatizations of the world's great novels 


NBC Radio Recording 


POLICE HEADQUARTERS 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Thrilling stories of modern crime detection 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


PORTS OF CALL 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Drama against the background of different lands 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


RADIO STUDIO MURDER 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery story set a?airst a ra^io taekeround 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


RADIO THEATRE OF FAMOUS CLASSICS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Adaptations of stories by Zola, Dumas, Ibsen, etc. 


Ray Green 


REFLECTIONS 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, optional 


$5-$64 


Mood music for relaxed, meditative listening 


NBC Radio Recording 


REMINISCIN' WITH SINGIN' SAM 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1-5 /wk 


$4 minimum 


Singin' Sam sings favorites of past and present 


Transcription Sales 


RENDEZVOUS WITH DAVID ROSS 


Musical 


Family 


15-30-min, 1-5 /wk 


$3.50-$75 


Ross' stories and poetry leading into loved music 


Harry S. Goodman 


RHAPSODY IN RHYTHM 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Pianistics, vocal sextette, and sinking soloists 


Broadcasters Proa Synd 


RHUMBA RHYTHMS & TANGO TUNES 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


South-of-the-border music by Chuy Perez orchestra 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


$4-$42 


Popular Western singing group 


Teleways 


RIP LAWSON, ADVENTURER 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, optional 


$4 minimum 


Wholesome adventure stories for children 


Transcription Sales 


ROBBINS' NEST 


Musical 


F'amily 


60-min, 6,'wk 


On request 


Fred Robbins' disk-jockey show, plus guest stars 


Ray Green 


ROMANCE OF MUSIC 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Donald Novis, singer, and Jan Ruoini, conductor 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


SACRED MUSIC 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


$10 minimum 


Sacred, religious music played by full orchestra 


Walter Bid'dick 


SADDLE ROCKIN' RHYTHM 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3-5 /wk 


$2.50-$25 


Typical Western music starring Shorty Thompson 


Radiozark 


SANTA'S MAGIC CHRISTMAS TREE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5 /wk 


$5 minimum 


Fantasy built around a magic lamp 


Kasper-Gordon 


SEALED BOOK, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1 wk 


$10 minimum 


Companion mystery series to "The Avenger" 


Charles Michelson 


SECRET AGENT K-7 RETURNS 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


$3 $35 


True stories of espionage, with Jay Jostyn 


Harry S. Goodman 


SEXTETTE FROM HUNGER 


Musical 


Fam ily 


15-min, 3 wk 


$4 minimum 


Dixieland jazz, plus name guest stars 


C. P. MacGregor 


SHAMROCKS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Kenny Baker, Barbara I.uddy, Irish songs and romance 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


SINGING WEATHERMAN, THE 


Jingles 


Family 


1-min, unlim 


$5-$35 


Open-end singing jingles 


Bloch-Joseph 


SINGING BAKERY ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Jingles 


Family 


1 -ii i in . unlim 


$5-$35 


Open-end jingles in Latin tempi. For bakeries only 


Bloch-Joseph 


SOMETHING FOR THE FAMILY 


Comedy 


F'amily 


15-min, 1 wk 


25% class-A h-hr 


Variety-comedy with George Jessel, Joan Barton 


Universal 


SONGS OF CHEER AND COMFORT 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, 1 wk 


$5 minimum 


Stars gospel singer Richard Maxwell in songs, philosophy 


Kasper-Gordon 


IN HIS STEPS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min. 1 wk 


$10- $75 


Storv of tolerant, kindly preacher 


Harrv S. Goodman 



O.R.F.S. — on request from station. 



62 



SPONSOR 



T 



Commercial in Purpose 



• • • 



on purpose 



Built 

f or 
Business... 

Sold 
to 
Sell 




NBC SYNDICATED SHOWS are truly commercial 

...written, directed and produced by people who know your local 
and regional sales picture and special production problems 

. . .designed to fill your programming needs : there's an NBC recorded 
show for every audience and every advertiser in every market 

...priced to fit a modest budget through the NBC cost-sharing feature. 

NBC SYNDICATED SHOWS are complete commercial packages, 
each wrapped in a record of continued listenership and sponsorship. 




Bigger than ever 

for the football season: 

TOUCHDOWN TIPS 
with Sam Hayes... 

ready for the fall line-up 



Wire or 
write today 
for availabilities 
and 

full details 




.Radio-Recording Division 

RCA Building, Radm City, Wew York • Chicago • Hollywood 



Radio Corporatia 
of America 



FALL FORECAST 

(Continued from page 27) 

a 13-week spin. There's no question 
but that insurance broadcast advertis- 
ing will hit a ten-year high during the 
1949-1950 season. 

19. Candy sales slumped during 
the first halt ot 1949. National 
broadcast advertising for sweets has 
dropped somewhat, but usually for 
reasons that had nothing to do with 
sales of the individual confectioner. 
Most leading candy and gum manu- 



facturers will be using network or 
selective advertising by 1 October 
1949. Some of the firms that have used 
broadcasting only as a special promo- 
tion, not as a week-to-week sales tool, 
will not be back on the air this Fall. 
The five-cent candy bar is back and 
so is competitive candy advertising. 

Since an increasing quantity of 
candy is sold through automatic ven- 
ders, advertising becomes daily more 
important in the sweets field — and 
there is little question that broadcast 
advertising is a potent factor in selling 
an "impulse item" like candy. 



IMPORTANT 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

TO ALL STATIONS 

SUBJECT: 

BLACKSTONE WASHING MACHINE 
CO-OPERATIVE CAMPAIGN 

+ "BLACKSTONE, MAGIC DETECTIVE," quarter-hour transcribed 
program, is again available on a co-operative 50-50 basis 
for Blackstone Washing Machine radio advertising. 

The strike, which has been in progress these past few months, 
has been settled, and the factory is authorizing all distributors 
and dealers to reinstate the broadcast of Blackstone, Magic 
Detective on the 50-50 basis as originally established. Con- 
tact your Blackstone dealer and distributor for your authoriza- 
tion to resume on the same basis as previously. 

If your market is one which hasn't contracted for the Black- 
stone, Magic Detective program for Blackstone Washers, then 
write us immediately for complete details as to how your 
station can sell this excellent Blackstone series on a co-opera- 
tive basis. Or, refer to our letter of October 22nd, 1948, 
which gave the information for your market. 

Give this your immediate attention, so that you may resume 
the Blackstone campaign, or, if you are a new market, get the 
campaign started. We will be glad to answer any questions 
you may have concerning the campaign. Your immediate 
attention is suggested. 

CHARLES MICHELSON, INC. 

Radio Transcriptions 

23 West 47th St., New York 19, N. Y. 
Plaza 7-0695 



20. Radio and television set manu- 
facturers, after a number of years 
of not using the air to sell their 
products, have once again sched- 
uled a number of radio network, 
TV network, and selective TV and 
radio schedules for this Fall. 

The reason is obvious. Radio listen- 
ers can be sold television sets. Both 
TV viewers and radio listeners can be 
sold records and the new multi-speed 
playing phonographs which will be 
available this Fall. Record business 
has been off, due to the battle between 
RCA and its 45-rpm disks and Colum- 
bia with its 3Sy:i-rpm LP disks. This 
battle will be resolved with all the more 
important recording companies issuing 
disks in all speeds, SS 1 /-^ 45, and 78 
rpm. (The latter speed is the old stan- 
dard.) 

The public will want a record player 
that will handle all disks, and that's 
a new market to be sold via radio and 
TV. Admiral, RCA, Philco, Emerson, 
and a number of other manufacturers, 
whose plans have not reached the an- 
nouncement stage, will be on the air 
this Fall. 

21. Home wares, except for nov- 
elties, have not used broadcast 
advertising to any extent. On the 
other hand, they have used television 
frequently during TV's short commer- 
cial life. Over 50 home ware manu- 
facturers are shooting film for TV 
which will be made available to their 
retailers. In some cases there will 
be cooperative advertising allowances 
and in other cases the retailers will 
have to pay for time themselves. 

22. Watches and jewelry sales 
will be off this Fall. The sales de- 
cline will be more apparent in the 
jewelry field than in the watch in- 
dustry. Many watch firms hit new 
highs in 1948, while others, out of step 
with the times, approached failure. 
Prices have been revised and credit 
jewelry houses no longer have to ad- 
here to any set down payments. 

Longines has two CBS network pro- 
grams on the air and Gruen will be 
partially sponsoring Hollywood Calling 
this Fall. Other firms have plans for 
network programs and TV sponsorship 
but aren't ready to reveal them. Selec- 
tive time signals, a mainstay of Bulova 
and Benrus advertising, continue to 
keep these two firms spinning. Both 
are using radio and TV. with Bulova 
having pioneered the 10-second TV 
time break. Elgin is said to be out of 
radio and TV. but that decision is 



64 



SPONSOR 



selective 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE PER EPISODE 


PRODUCERS' EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER 


IN THE AIR WITH ROGER GALE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 3-5 /wk 


Based on mkt 


Juvenile air background plot 


Russell C. Comer 


IT TAKES A WOMAN 


Drama 


Women 


5-min, 2-5 /wk 


On request 


Capsule soap operas, each episode complete 


Charlie Basch 


IT'S A GREAT SHOW 


Comedy 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Joey Adams, Tony Canzoneri in comedy variety show 


Ray Green 


IT'S SHOWTIME FROM HOLLYWOOD 


Musical 


Family 


15-30-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Freddy Martin's orchestra and guest stars 


Frederic W. Ziv 


JEFF BRYANT AND HIS COWHORN 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, 3-5/wk 


$1.50-$16 


Delightful outdoor yarns told by Jeff Bryant 


Gordon M. Day 


JERRY AT FAIROAKS 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Story of a boy at Fairoaks Military Academy 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


JERRY OF THE CIRCUS 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Boy's adventures backstage with a circus 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


JEWELS OF DESTINY 


Drama 


Family 


5-15-min,3/wk 


On request 


Interesting stories of famous jewels 


Affiliated Prog Serv 


JIM AMECHE, STORYTELLER 


Drama 


Family 


5- 15-min, 1-5, wk 


$3-$75 


Narration of little-known events in famous lives 


Harry S. Goodman 


JOE AND CYNTHIA 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Situation comedy around Mr.-Mrs. theme 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


JOE EMERSON'S HYMN TIME 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, optional 


$3.25-$90 


Friendly philosophy, familiar hymns and spirituals 


Morton Radio Prodns 


JOE MCCARTHY SPEAKS 


Sports 


Men 


5-min, 5, wk 


$2-$30 


Inside stories by famed baseball manager 


Richard H. lillman 


JOHN J ANTHONY HOUR 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


$5 minimum 


A favorite program since 1936 


Charles Michelson 


JUDGE HARDY'S FAMILY 


Comedy 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


From the MGM "Andy Hardy" movie series 


MGM Radio 


JORDANAIRES QUARTET 


Religious 


Adult 


15-30-min, 1-7 /wk 


$2.50-$25 


Gospel and spiritual singing 


Radiozark 


JUM P JUMP OF HOLIDAY HOUSE 


Variety 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


$8-156.25 


Elfin character in adventures for kids 


Harry S. Goodman 


KAY LORRAINE MEMORY TIME 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1-2/wk 


$7$ 125 


Radio's versatile songstress, and F>ank Gallup 


Harry S. Goodman 


KING COLE COURT 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 2/wk 


$4 minimum 


King Cole Trio and musical guest stars 


C. P. MacGregor 


KOMEDY KINGDOM 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Hilarity coupled with music 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


KORN KOBBLERS 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Band of a thousand gadgets and gags 


Frederic W. Ziv 


LADY SKY HOOK STORIES 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Fairytale adventures appealing to children 


Russell C. Comer 


LAFF PARADE 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Ken Niles, Gene Morgan, and headline acts 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


LAST OF THE MOHICANS 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Famed "Leather Stocking" tale by Cooper 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


LEAHY OF NOTRE DAME 


Sports 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$9.65 minimum 


Noted coach discusses football, predicts winners 


Lew Green 


LEISURE HOUSE 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 1-2/wk 


$10-$100 


Public utility, appliance commercial in drama form 


George Logan Price 


LIFE IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS 


Sports 


Family 


5-min, 1/wk 


$2 minimum 


Informative, exciting talks on nature 


Transcription Sales 


LIGHTNING JIM 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30-min, 3-5, wk 


Based on mkt 


Western adventure story w ith star network cast 


Frederic W. Ziv 


LINDA'S FIRST LOVE 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$3-$50 


Soap opera now in its 11th year 


Harry S. Goodman 


LIVING PAGES FROM BOOK OF LIFE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$10-$100 


The world's most-loved Bible stories 


George Logan Price 


LONDON TOWN 


Variety 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Tour of London night life 


S. W. Caldwell 


LOUISE MASSEY t THE WESTERNERS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1-7/wk 


$4-$90 


Popular Western musical with big rural appeal 


Morton Radio Prodns 


LOVE TALES 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Modern romantic dramas 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MAGIC CHRISTMAS WINDOW, THE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, optional 


$4.9O-$70 


Traditional and original Christmas tales 


NBC Radio-Recording 


MAGIC ISLAND 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


People living under water on a disappearing island 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MAISIE 


Comedy 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


New radio adaptations of MGM picture series 


MGM Radio 


MGM THEATRE OF THE AIR 


Drama 


Family 


1-hr, 1/wk 


On request 


Adaptations of MGM film successes; top names 


MGM Radio 


MAMA BLOOM'S BROOD 


Comedy 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Witty domestic situation comedy 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MARION AND REGGIE 


Comedy 


Family 


5-min, 1-5/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Fast, clean humor smartly paced and produced 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MARY FOSTER, EDITOR'S DAUGHTER 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 5/wk 


$3-$50 


Soap opera now in its 10th year 


Harry S. Goodman 


MASTERS MUSIC ROOM 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Familiar semi-classical, light-opera music 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MEET THE BAND 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 6/wk 


On request 


Top name bands in popular tunes 


Standard Trans Serv 


MEET THE MENJOUS 


Mr. & Mrs. 


Family 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


Based on mkt 


Screen actor Adolphe Menjou and his wife 


Frederic W. Ziv 


MELODY LANE 


Musical 


Family 


5-min, 1-5/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Songs by the Troubador, soft rhythm orchestra 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MEMORIES 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Tales of wanderings in foreign countries 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MEMORIES OF HAWAII 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Sol Hoopii arrangements of Polynesian melodies 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MERCER McCLEOD 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$3.5O-$50 


One-man portrayal of suspense stories 


NBC Radio-Recording 


METROPOLIS 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Gripping stories of a great city 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MIKE-ING HISTORY 


Drama 


Family 


5-min, optional 


$2 minimum 


Famous historical events reenacted 


Transcription Sales 


MIKE MYSTERIES 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Musical incorporating complete 2-minute whodunit 


Lang-Worth 


MIRACLES OF FAITH 


Narrative 


Family 


5-min, 3/wk 


$10-$50 


Bob Swan narrates stories of world's miracles 


Fred C. Mertens 


MIRTH PARADE 


Variety 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Comedy with Don Wilson, Bob Burns, Tizzie Lish 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MR RUMPLE BUMPLE 


Narrative 


Juvenile 


5-min, optional 


$3 minimum 


Children's stories of Wallie the Walrus, etc. 


Transcription Sales 


MODERN HOMEMAKERS INSTITUTE 


Aud partic 


Women 


30-min, 3/wk 


On request 


Modern hints and facts for housewives 


Jack Parker 


MOON DREAMS 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, 3-5/wk 


$3.5O-$40 


Musical background to poetic readings 


Teleways 


MOON OVER AFRICA 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


African jungle mystery', black magic 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


MORNING ALMANAC 


Variety 


Family 


60-min, 6/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Headlines from history, anniversaries, noted dates 


Associated Prog Serv 


MOVIE TIME 


Musical 


Family 


10-min, 6/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Music from best Hollywood films, notes about stars 


Associated Prog Serv 


MOVIE WESTERN THEATRE 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Radio adaptation of Western motion pictures Bob Davey 



O.R.F.S. — on request from station. 



18 JULY 1949 



65 




i DOCTOR'S ORDERS 



See your station 
representative or write 

UHHIWI 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W. 57th ST., NEW 1T0RK 19, N. Y. 



"D for programming to answer new 
r national interest in health. Self- 
contained quarter-hours of human in- 
terest drama, authentic medical state- 
ments. Network production and Cast- 
ing — but the "star" is your hometown 
doctor ! 

For retail druggists, phar- 
maceutical manufacturers, 
insurance, banks — a new 
program service listeners 
really want. 

For Medical Societies, Phar- 
maceutical Associations, 
community welfare — a pub- 
lic relations campaign that 
can pay its own way. 

''We wish to compliment you on the high 
fidelity of your pressings, the excellent pro- 
duction, and especially on the general idea — 
which enables broadcasters to open an en- 
tirely new field of revenue." — KRNO-San 
Bo nardino. 

Write for audition package: 

RADIO PROVIDENCE 

Howard Building, Providence 3, R. I. 



How spot time buyers 

benefit from 
Service- Ads* in S'RVS 



Take this WGY ad, for instance. It highspots 
up-to-press-time information on Coverage, Sales 
Potential, Audience, Mail Pull, Results, Cost . . . 
additional information that helps you when 
you're making station selections or that sug- 
gests the availability of further data you may 
want to consider. 



\Wifl 



■"'■'■ "'■'■"■" 



WGY 

...... ©'."..,. 






Time buyers tell us such Service-Ads* save their 
time, bring them up to date, make it easier for 
them to identify the stations that offer the best 
possibilities in the markets of specific interest. 




We're doing what we can to get stations 
to make real Service-Ads* of all the space 
they use in SRDS Radio & TV Section. 
For example, the SPOT RADIO PROMO- 
TION HANDBOOK we've just published 
describes the kind of station information 
time buyers say they want. If you would 
benefit from better station promotion, 
why not mention the Handbook to your 
radio friends. They can get copies from 
us at a dollar per. 

*Service-Ads in SRDS are informative ads 
near listings that sell by helping buyers buy. 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, Inc. 

The National Authority Servin&lhe Media-buying Function 
333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE • CHICAGO 1, HL. 



open to change if some other watch 
firm seems to be using the medium to 
cut into Elgin sales. 

23. Farm machinery hit its high 
point in sales during the Fall of 
last year. Machinery is still selling 
well, but it must be pushed and the fact 
that it has the International Harvester 
label isn't enough any more. A high 
percentage of the nation's farms have 
still to be mechanized. To reach these 
prospects it will be necessary to pro- 
duce a lower priced line of equipment 
and to advertise aggressively. There 
has been very little "reason-why" copy 
addressed to farmers on equipment. 
There will be considerable this Fall. 

24. Feed and seed sales were high 
in the drought section of the coun- 
try but off in the rest of the nation. 
Farm income is 10-15'< lower than a 
year ago, but is very high in compari- 
son to what it was prewar. There 
was some feeling among station farm 
directors that there would be drastic 
cuts in agricultural programing this 
Fall. There won't be, except on sta- 
tions that never should have had farm 
programs to start with. The rural 
population will be high grade con- 
sumer prospects for at least two years 
to come. Since Madison Avenue agen- 
cies have discovered the rural market, 
farm programs will continue to be 
sponsored, with new advertisers cut- 
ting their wisdom teeth in this field 
monthly. 

25. Home appliances are still in 
great demand. Washing machines, 
especially the automatic type, lead the 
appliance parade for even the lush 
suburban homes install them to avoid 
top laundry costs. Refrigerator prices 
have been cut to keep pace with the de- 
clining price index and as a result they 
too are in big demand. However, the 
appliance industry is convinced that no 
line will sell itself any longer and 
there 11 be plenty of appliance advertis- 
ing on the Fall air. both radio and TV. 

For the first time in years, some of 
the secondary names in the appliance 
field will use selective air time to open 
doors to house-to-house selling crews 
that will be making the rounds. Radio 
has been found to be the most superior 
door-opener of any advertising medi- 
um. Fuller Brush doorbell-pushers of 
yeas ago still recall how housewives 
sang their program's theme song in 
answer to the Fuller Brush salesman's 
knock. 

(Please turn to 107). 



66 



SPONSOR 



selective 



NAME 


TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE PER EPISODE 


PRODUCERS' EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER 


MUSIC FOR AMERICA 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Star-studded musical revue featuring top radio names 


Associated Prog Serv 


SONG OF THE WEST 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Real cowboy sonis by real cowpunchers 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


SONG OF YESTERYEAR 


Musical 


Adult 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Favorite old-time songs in an old-home setting 


I'.n. i !r .i |,-i I'rng Synd 


SONG WITHOUT WORDS 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Salon musicale under direction of Mahlon Merrick 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


SONNY AND BUDDY 


Variety 


Juvenile 


15-min, 2 wk 


$3-515 


Two youngsters on a medicine-show tour 


Walter Biddick 


SONS OF THE PIONEERS 


Musical 


FamiK 


15-min, 3-5 wk 


$4-$50 


Western group known for its movies, records 


Teleways 


SO THE STORY GOES 


Narrative 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$3~$90 


Human-interest stories about well-known people 


Morton Radio Prodns 


SOUVENIR SONGS 


Musical 


Family 


5-min, 6/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Words and music of past and present hit son's 


Associated Prog Serv 


SPEEO GIBSON 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Aviation and mystery in the Orient 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


SPICE OF LIFE, THE 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$15 minimum 


Musical-variety show, written entirely in rhyme 


Kasper-Gordon 


SPORTS A-POPPIN 


Sports 


Family 


15-min, 3 wk 


$10-$50 


News, views, and interviews of the sports world 


Capico Kapps 


STAND BY FOR ADVENTURE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 2 wk 


S3.50-S50 


A magic carpet to thrilling experiences 


NBC Radio Recording 


STARS SING, THE 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Vic Damone, Kay Armen, Phil Brito, Evelvn Knight, others 


Associate! Pro» Serv 


STONEHIU PRISON MURDER 


Drama 


Fam ily 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Excellent detective mysteries 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


STORY BEHIND THE SONG, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Dramatizations of the lives of great comrosers 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


STRANGE ADVENTURE 


Drama 


Family 


5-min, 3-5 /wk 


$2-$ 10 


Dramatic stories narrated by Pat McGeehan 


Telewavs 


STRANGE ADVENTURES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Strange stories of strange lands 


Broadcasters Pro? Synd 


STRANGE WILLS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$7.50-5275 


Strange stories of peculiar wills left by people 


Telewavs 


STRATOSPHERE MURDER MYSTERY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Mystery aboard an airliner 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


STREAMLINED FAIRY TALES 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 1-3 /wk 


$3.50-$50 


Modernized versions of well-known fairytales 


Harry S. Goodman 


STRIKE UP THE BAND 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Brass-band music, military and classical 


Associated Pro;; Sj rid 


STROLLIN' TOM 


Narrative 


Family 


15-min, 1-5 wk 


On request 


Homespun philosophy with a friendly approach 


Cii 'ore Prodns 


SUSPICION 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1-3 wk 


vi *_>:, 


A literate, intelligent whodunit 


Transcril cd Radio Show 


TEXAN, THE 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30-min, 1/wk 


$12.50 minimum 


The adventures of Jery Brazen, Texas Ranker 


Kasper-Gordon 


THAT WAS THE YEAR 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Re-ereation of notable events in recent years 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


THEATRE OF FAMOUS RADIO PLAYERS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$7.50 minimum 


Stories played by leading radio actors 


Les Mitchel 


THIS IS THE STORY 


Narrative 


Family 


15-min, 1-5 wk 


$4.50-$150 


Little-known facts about well-known people 


Morton Radio Prodns 


THIS THING CALLED LOVE 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 1-5 wk 


Based on mkt 


Drama cameos of the world 's greatest love scenes 


Edward Sloman Prodns 


THREE SUNS AND A STARLET 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3/wk 


$6.60-$7fi.35 


A favorite instrumental trio, plus guests 


NBC Radio Recording 


THRILLS FROM GREAT OPERAS 


Drama 


Adult 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Drama around musical highlights from great oreras 


Broadcasters Prog Synd 


THROUGH THE LISTENING GLASS 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Kaleidoscope of the fnest music written 


Lang- Worth 


THROUGH THE SPORT GLASS 


Sports 


Men 


15-min, optional 


$3.50-$30 


Thrilling moments in sports history 


NBC Radio Recording 


TIME IN RHYME 


Jingles 


Family 


lC-sec, unlim 


On request 


Singing time jingles featuring the Debonaires 


B loch-Joseph 


TIME OUT FOR FUN & MUSIC 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, optional 


S4.5O-S31.50 


Songs and banter with Allen Prescott and others 


NBC Radio Recording 


TIME TO SING WITH LANNY & GINGER 


Musical 


Family 


5-min, 3/wk 


$1.9O-$20.5O 


Breezy songs and cheerful patter 


NBC Radio Recording 


TIME WAS 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Historical review of recent years set to music 


Associated Prog Serv 


TOBY'S CORNTUSSEL NEWS 


Comedy 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$3 £inimum 


Comedy tribulations of small-town newspaper editor 


Transcription Sales 


TOUCHDOWN TIPS WITH SAM HAYES 


Sports 


Men 


15-min, 1/wk 


$10-$50 


Famed sportscaster in series of grid facts, forecasts 


NBC Radio Recording 


TRANSATLANTIC MURDER MYSTERY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Detective story with luxury-liner background 


Broadcasters Prog Syn 


TREASURE OF THE LORELEI 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 2/wk 


$3 $15 


High-seas adventure, piracy, furied treasure 


Walter Biddick 


TROPICANA 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3 wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Latin-American msiuc 


Assoc iated Prog Serv 


TUNE TIME 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Sophisticated music by top small bands 


Associated Prog Serv 


TWENTIETH-CENTURY SERENADE 


Musical 


Family 


3C-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Popular concert arrangements of standard songs 


Stand Radio Trans Serv 


UNCLE EZRA 


Talk 


Family 


5-min, 6 wk 


$2-$16 


Country-style philosophy 


Co-op Bdcstg Serv 


UNCLE JIMMY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1-6 wk 


$5 minimum 


Daytime soap opera starring William Farnum 


Kasper-Gordon 


UNEXPECTED, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


15- Sin, 1-3 /wk 


25%cla ssA H hr 


Drama, adventure, suspense, comedy, variety 


Universal 


UNSOLVED MYSTERIES 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$5 minimum 


Dramatizations of famous unsolved mysteries 


Kasper-Gordon 


UNUSUAL MUSICAL 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 5 wk 


On request 


Clever and amusing musical prcram 


Affiliated Prog Serv 


VAGA60N0 ADVENTURER, THE 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1-2-3 wk 


$5 minimum 


Stars Tom Terriss, internationally-known adventurer 


Kasper-Gordon 


VAN DAMME QUINTET, LOUISE CARLYLE 


Musical 


Fam ily 


15-min, 3 wk 


$4.30-$50.80 


Subtle swing rhythms and lilting vocals 


NBC Radio Recording 


VAN TEETERS, THE 


Comely 


Family 


05-min, 1/wk 


O.R.F.S. 


Satire on current social and financial structure 


Broadcasters Prog Serv 


VARIETY FAIR 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, 3-6 wk 


25% class A '., hr 


Music-variety show localed at mythical fair grounds 


Universal 


WEIRD CIRCLE, THE 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1 wk 


$7-$ 100 


Fantasy and mystery classics dramatized 


NBC Radio Recording 


WESTWARD HO 


Musical 


Family 


5-nin, 5 wk 


$10-$50 


Curley Bradley, cowboy singer, story teller, philosopher 


Wiederheld 


WE THE JURY 


Drama 


Family 


15-min, 1-3 wk 


$5-$25 


Crime stories, with audience participation 


Transcribed Radio Show 


WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE? 


Narrative 


Family 


5-min, 5/wk 


$2.50 minimum 


Elaboration of choice, unusual news bits 


Broadcasters' Guild 


WINGS OF SONG 


Musical 


Family 


15-min, optional 


$5 minimum 


Em ile Cote and his Serenaders, Warren Sweeney mc 


Transcription Sales 


YOUR GOSPEL SINGER 


Musical 


Family 


1-7 wk 


$3.50-535 


Edward MacHugh singing gospel songs, hymns 


Harry S. Goodman 


YOUR HYMN FOR THE DAY 


Musical 


1 amik 


5-min, 5 wk 


$10-550 1 Familiar hymns r>v Gere Baker and Irma Glen 


Wiederhold 



18 JULY 1949 



67 




'O>US0?6 



WITH THIS 



The Most Sensitive FM Radio Ever Built 



FOB THE PUBLIC 




ONLY ZENITH GIVES YOU THIS 



F 



Most Sensitive 
Performance 

Superb reception 
even on weak signals. 



Longer Distance / No Interference / No Static 

Because of high sensitivity, / No whistles, no over- / Even in the worst 



brings in stations in fringe 
areas others miss. 



lap, no cross-talk, no 
background hiss. 



storms. Only rich, 
glorious tone. 



No Special 

Antenna 

With Zenith's patented / 
Power-Line Antenna, 
just plug in and play. 




Whatever has been your experience with FM — what- 
ever FM radio you have ever heard— Zenith t now asks 
you to listen to a new marvel of Radionict science. 

This all-new Zenith Model is the climax of years 
of acknowledged leadership in genuine Zenith -Arm- 
strong FM — that hundreds of thousands know as true 
FM — the FM radio that leading FM stations over the 
nation rely upon to monitor and test their own broad- 
casts— truly the FM of the Experts! Now, in a new Super- 
Sensitive circuit that gives perfected performance even 
on signals too weak for ordinary sets to catch. 

So we say — hear, compare! Be prepared to hear the 
most sensitive FM receiver you have ever listened to — 
a genuine Zenith-Armstrong receiver at a sensation- 
ally low price. 



The Super-Sensitive "MAJOR'' 



The lowest price ever for genuine 
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♦Suggested Retail Price. 
Prices subject to change without notice. 



68 



SPONSOR 




It's on the way up again 



The FM fog is clearing 

Low price receivers, better promotion, 
storecasting, and transitradio all help 



The most significant FM develop- 
ment during the past year has been in 
the field of engineering. Only recently 
have enough first-class sets in lower- 
price brackets began to reach the mar- 
ket to give great numbers of people a 
taste of FM's unique staticless. full- 
range reproduction program. Zenith is 
currently leader in production of a 
low-price high-quality receiver. 

Despite the promotion already done, 
by FMA and individual stations, it's 
still necessary to educate most listeners 
in large metropolitan areas to the fact 
that they can hear not only many ( or 
all) network shows via FM affiliates 

18 JULY 1949 



of web outlets, but numerous exclu- 
sive shows available only on FM. This 
is no problem in those few areas where 
because of combined FM promotional 
activity and poor AM receptivity FM 
is already the dominant system of 
aural broadcasting. 

Edgar Kobak, former Mutual presi- 
dent, deplored the amount of "blue 
sky" being sold in AM coverage. 
Nevertheless, there is, compared with 
other media, a super-abundance of cir- 
culation and sales information avail- 
able to a sponsor considering AM 
radio. This hasn't yet been provided 
prospective sponsors to a satisfactory 



degree by most FM stations. As Lin- 
nea Nelson of J. Walter Thompson, 
and others in the trade have bluntly 
emphasized, there isn't enough infor- 
mation on the sales effectiveness of FM 
commercial programing. The FMA has 
unfortunately been overly preoccupied 
with fights inside the industry and 
thus unable to concentrate fully on this 
vital problem. 

There are more than 700 commer- 
cial FM stations in operation in about 
450 cities. But these facts don't yet 
impress many advertisers — even the 
fact that the coverage is as interfer- 
ence- and static-free at night as in the 
day — until they can be shown what it 
means to them in terms of returns per 
dollar invested. This is a joint station 
and industry job that will have to be 
licked before sponsor dollars flow FM- 
way in the quantities the industry be- 
lieves it justifies. 



69 



The public in some localities has 
had a growing tendency to regard the 
medium as a facility instead of a dif- 
ferent and superior form of transmit- 
ting a broadcast signal. Thus transit- 
radio and storecasting (see separate 
reports in this issue) have already 
come to mean something to thousands 
whose only notion of FM was ^long- 
haired" music. 

Other thousands, interested either 
because they wanted staticless, inter- 
ference-free reception or FM exclu- 
sives, such as sports ( by no means the 



only type of exclusive available), be- 
came disillusioned by purchasing poor- 
quality sets that performed little better 
than AM sets in the same price-range 
and which "drifted" regularly. This 
situation is rapidly being corrected. 
But many advertisers as well as listen- 
ers have unfortunately judged the me- 
dium by poor receivers. 

Another negative that is being cor- 
rected is the bottle-neck caused by re- 
tailers whose salespeople have been 
woefully ignorant of the FM facts of 
life. It hasn't been too long since some 



into 



the v»y 






et^ 



tnetn 



ber^P 



vittKVX 





EARS TO HEAR 

A nucleus of the Union's quarter million 
members, hound by a unique loyalty to 
their own station .. .with the prospect of 
steadily growing "workshop listening." 
Plus consistent growth among all FM 
listeners through expert programming. 

WILL TO RELIEVE 

To this favorably disposed audience, 
a station of inherent social 

responsibility must carry conviction. 
50% of WFDR's time in each cycle must be 

non-commercial, in the public service. 
Selected commercial sponsors will benefit by 
the resultant audience receptivity. 

MONEY TO SPEND 



\^$ 




The Union's quarter million members 
who earn $17,500,000 weekly rank high 
in proportion of a spendable income. 
They are alert, progressive, 

interested in the commodities 
and services of modern America. 



WFDR 



FM- 104.3 

BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



Sponsored as a public service by the 
International Ladies' Garment Workers Union 

1710 Broadway, New York City, Columbus 5-7000 



salesmen were actually discouraging 
customer inquiries with remarks such 
as FM isn't really different from stan- 
dard broadcasting, that FM is dead 
and will soon disappear, etc. These 
may be extreme examples of the ig- 
norance and misinformation at one 
time widely prevalent among radio re- 
tail sales people, but they illustrate why 
manufacturers and stations had to un- 
dertake a campaign to educate retailers 
to the facts about FM. 

Numerous FM construction permits, 
it is true, have been turned back to 
the FCC. as holders realized the sys- 
tem was not going to be the bonanza 
once predicted. This trend will not 
continue if advertisers can be shown 
that in many areas today FM is the 
only way many listeners — their cus- 
tomers, or potential customers — can 
hear network programs at night is 
through the web station's FM affiliate. 
The medium is growing steadily. It 
still has to be sold. * -* * 



Storecasting 

Point-of-sale FM 
developing rapidly 

Virtually all storecasting operations 
are now serviced by FM stations. There 
are still a few marketing spots where 
stations and point-of-sale merchandis- 
ers haven't come to terms with broad- 
casters. The Acme Markets of Phila- 
delphia, and 81 independent stores 
serviced by Musicall in New York, are 
still linked by telephone lines. This is 
also true of the Baltimore Markets in 
Philadelphia. They are operating their 
own storecasting service. 

The original Stanley Joseloff Store- 
cast Corporation of America operation 
in New England has switched from 
land line to being served by WMMW. 
Meriden, Conn. Three chains in Pitts- 
burgh ( Thorofare. Giant Eagle, and 
Sparkie) are served by WKJF-FM. In 
Chicago there are three storecasting 
operations. WMOR serves the Jewel 
Food Stores through Consumers Aid. 
WEAW serves IGA super markets for 
WEAM-FM and WEHF programs for 
Storecast's National Tea operation. 

In Des Moines, Storadio Advertis- 
ing services 21 Thrift Way super mar- 
kets through KSO-FM. In the South. 
Winston-Salem's WMIT is servicing a 
group of Colonial Stores. 

Before the vear is out. giant mar- 



70 



SPONSOR 



T 




The FM picture: Fall 1949 

Dots on map indicate where FM stations are on the air. 
Number of stations in operation in each town are listed below 



lirton 

n.ngham 
Gadsden 
Huntsville 
Lanett 
Mobile 
Montgomery 
Sylaceuge 

ARIZONA 
ARKANSAS 
eiythevllle 
Conway 
Ft Smith 
Jonesboro 
Slloam Springs 
Utle Rod 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersf.ek) 

Berieley 

Eureka 

Fresno 

Long Beech 

KLos Angeles 
Chico 
Marysvllle 
Merced 
Modesto 
Monterey 
Oakland 
Ontario 
Pasadena 
Redding 
Richmond 
Riverside 
Sacramento 
San Bernardcno 
San Bruno 
San D,ego 
San Froncisco 



San Jose 
San Luis Obispo 
Santa Ana 
Santa Mana 
Stoclton 

COLORADO 
Denver 

CONNECTICUT 
Danbury 
Greenwich 
Hartford 
Mer.den 
New Britain 
New Haven 



DELAWARE 
Wilmington 
DISTOF COL 
Washington 
FLORIDA 
Daytona Beach 
Ft. Lauderdale 
Gainesville 



,.lle 



Jacks' 
Miam, 

Miami Bead 
Orlando 
Palm Beach 
Pensacola 
St. Petersbu. 
Tallahassee 



Ta 



ipa 



WPalm 

GEORGIA 

Athens 

Atlanta 

Cedartown 



5 

ill data as of 1 July 1949 



Co'lu 
Gain 



Savannah 

Toccoa 

Valdosta 



Pocatello 
Twin Falls 



ILLINOIS 

Alton 

Aurora 

Bloomington 

Canton 

Carbondale 

Centralia 

Champaign 

Chicago 

Decatur 

Elmwood Pari 

Evanston 

Freeport 

Harrisburg 

Herrin 

Jacksonville 

Kankakee 

La Grange 

Mt. Vernon 

Oak Park 

Peoria 

Quincy 

Rock Island 

Springfield 

Urbana 

Waukegan 



Woodstock 

INDIANA 

Anderson 

Columbus 

Connersville 

Crawfordsville 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Ft. Wayne 

Hammond 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Michigan City 

Marlon 

Muncie 

New Castle 

Shelbyville 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Wabash 

Washington 

IOWA 
Burlington 
Cedar Rapids 
Clinton 
Council Bluffs 
Davenport 
Des Moines 
Dubuque 
Ft. Dodge 
Keokuk 
Mason City 



I Topeka 
Wichita 

1 KENTUCKY 

1 Ashland 

I Bowling Gree 

I Henderson 

1 Hopkins* 



I Holyoke 



ell 



Lou 

Madisi 

Owens 

Paduc, 



. II. 



,ille 



I LOUISIANA 



Baton Rou< 
Lafayette 



Shrevepc 

MAINE 



Portland 

MARYLAND 

Annapolis 






atir 



Siou. City 
Waterloo 

KANSAS 
Garden Cit' 

Hutchinson 
Kansas City 
McPherson 



Bradbury Heights ■ 
Cumberland 
Frederick J 

Hagerstown 

Salisbury 

Silver Spring ' 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Chicopee 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Greenfield 



New Bedford 
North Adams 
Pittsfleld 
West Yarmoutr 
Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Benton Harbor 

Detroit 

Oak Park 

Flint 

Grand Rapids 

Jackson 

Mt. Clemens 

Muskegon 

Owosso 

Pontiac 

Port Huron 

Royal Oak 

Wyandotte 

MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Mankato 

Minn-St. Paul 

Northf.eld 

Rochester 

St. Cloud 

St. Paul 

Winona 

MISSISSIPPI 

Greenville 

Gulfport 

Jackson 

Merldan 



Hattiesburq 

MISSOURI 

Cape Girardea 

Clayton 

Jefferson City 

Joplin 

Kansas City 

Kennett 

Popular Bluff 

St, Joseph 

St. Louis S 

Springfield I 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln I 

Omaha 2 
NEVADA 

Las Vegas I 

Reno I 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Claremont I 

Manchester 2 

Nashua I 

Portsmith I 
NEW JERSEY 

Alpine I 

Asbury Park 2 

Atlantic City I 

Bndgeton I 

Elizabeth I 

Greenbrook Twp. | 

Newark 2 

New Brunswick 2 

Paterson 2 

Trenton I 
NEW YORK 
Albany 

Auburn ' 

Binghamton > 

Buffalo 5 

Cherry Valley ' 

Corning ' 



C rtland 
DeRuyter 
Elmira 
Endicott 

ipstea 

nell 



.., 



I Lockport 
I Massena 
5 New York City 
I Niagara Falls 
Ogdensburg 

1 Olean 

2 Oneonta 
Oswego 
Poughkeepsie 

! Rochester 
Schenectady 
South Bristol 
Syracuse 
Troy 
Tur.n 
Ut.ca 

Watertown 
Wethersf.eld 
White Plains 
N CAROLINA 
Asheville 
Burlington 
Charlotte 

Fayetteville 

Forest City 

Gastonia 

Goldsborough 

Greensborough 

Henderson 

Hickory 

High Point 

Le.ington 

Raleigh 



Reidsv.lle 


1 


PENNSYLVANIA 




TENNESSEE 




Norfolk 


Roanoke Rapids 


1 


Allentown 


3 


Bristol 


1 


Portsmouth 


Rocky Mountain 


2 


Altoona 


2 


Chattanooga 


3 


Richmond 


Salisbury 


1 


8ethlehem 


2 


Clarksville 


1 


Roanoke 


Shelby 


1 


Butler 


2 


Jackson 


1 


Suffolk 


Statesvllle 


1 


Chambersburg 
Dubois 


1 


Johnson City 


1 


Winchester 


Wilmington 


1 


1 


Kingsport 


1 


WASHINGTON 


Wilson 


1 


Easton 


1 


Knoiville 


1 


Longview 


Winston-Salem 


2 


Erie 


2 


Memphis 


2 


Seattle 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Harrisburg 


2 


Nairn • 


2 


Tacoma 


Fargo 


1 


Johnstown 


2 


TEXAS 




WEST VIRGINIA 


OHIO 
Akron 


1 


Lancaster 
Lebanon 


2 
2 


Abilene 
Amarillo 


1 
2 


Beckley 
Bluefleld 


Alliance 

Ashland 


r 
I 


Lewlstown 
McKeesport 
New Castle 


1 

1 
1 


Baytown 

Beaumont 

Belton 


1 
1 
I 


Clarksburg 
Huntington 
Logan 

Martlnsburg 
Morgantown 
Oak Hill 
Parlersburg 
Wheeling 


Ashtabula 

Bellalre 

Canton 

Cincinnati 

Lima 

Newark 


I 

i 

3 
3 
2 
1 


Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Pottsvllle 

Reading 

Scranton 

Sharon 


7 

7 
2 

1 
3 

1 


Dallas 
Edlnburg 
Ft. Worth 
Galvesl . n 
Harllngen 
Houston 


4 
1 

1 

4 


Portsmith 


1 


Sunbury 


I 


Longvlew 
Lufkm 




WISCONSIN 


Springfield 


1 


Uniontown 


2 


1 


Beloit 


Tiffin 


1 


Warren 


1 


San Angelo 
San Antonio 




Eau Claire 


Toledo 


2 


Washngton 


1 


4 


Green Bey 


Wooster 


1 


Wilkes-Barre 


3 


Temple 
Teiarkana 


1 


Greenfield 


Youngstown 


2 


WHIiemsport 


2 


1 


Jamesville 


OKLAHOMA 




York 


3 


Tyler 


I 


Madison 


Ardmore 


1 


RHODE ISLAND 




Vernon 


1 


Morshfleld 


Durant 


1 


Providence 


4 


Wichita Falls 


2 


Merrill 


Enid 
Muskogee 


2 


S CAROLINA 


UTAH 




Milwaukee 
Neenah 


Oklahoma City 
Stillwater 


4 


Anderson 


I 


Ogden 




Oshkosh 


1 


Charleston 


2 


Salt Lake City 


2 


Racine 


Tulsa 


2 


Columbia 


1 


VIRGINIA 




Rice Lake 


OREGON 


" 


Greenville 
Greenwood 


2 
1 


Arlington 
Crewe 


1 
1 


Sheboygan 
Waukesha 


Albany 


1 


Rock Hill 


1 


Danville 


1 


Wausau 


Eugene 


1 


Spartanburg 


2 


Harrisonburg 


1 


Wisconsin Rapids 


Grants Pass 
Portland 


1 

6 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


Lynchburg 
Newport News 


2 
1 


WYOMING 



18 JULY 1949 



71 






US! 



kets in Los Angeles and San Francisco ers in each store have been designed so the advertisers that started with Con- 
will be served b\ music news, and that it's possible with a "beep" note to sinner's Aid (the list in previous para- 
spoken advertising. Both the Musical! raise the sound level for the com- graph ) are still heard in the Jewel 
and WJZ-TV New York pilot opera- mercial sections of the broadcasts. It's Tea stores and that Stanlev Joseloff's 
tions are being carefully studied. The also possible where a number of chains Storecast Corporation has a record of 
visual musical shopping service of in an area are serviced by one sta- almost 100/v renewals. 
ABC's Eastern key station, a plan of ti° n to cut ori a h* speakers in the chains Also important to broadcasting is 
Modell and Harbruck. serves super not scheduled for certain commercials, fact that less than half of the users 
markets in the Grand Union chain. Indicative of the varied commercials of storecasting are regular broadcast 
Most merchandising experts insist carried by in-store broadcasting are the advertisers. Since all storecasts are 
that until the New York market is e l even heard over WMOR in Chicago; heard on the air as well as in the 

Borden's Milk, Clapp's Baby Food, stores, these advertisers are getting 
Diamond Crystal Salt. Holsum Baked their first taste of the airs effective- 
Products, McCormick Spices, Minute ness. Several are finding that their 
Maid Products, My-T-Fine. Salerno- commercials not only are selling at 
Megowen Biscuits, Pepsi-Cola, Quaker the point of sale but in other stores 
Oats, Reed's Candy. Silvercup Bread, not serviced by storecasting. While 
Allen V. Smith foods and Thomas J. storecasting, as a facet of FM radio. 
Webb coffee. was not conceived as a device to intro- 
Effectiveness of this type of point-of- duce advertisers to the effectiveness 
sale spoken-word broadcast advertising of FM broadcasting, it is doing it 
is indicated by fact that practically all just the same. + * + 



Over 500 advertisers using new "captive 
audience" medium for direct results 



really opened, storecasting can't be 
weighed as a national advertising medi- 
um. There is little question but that 
the metropolis will have storecasting 
service from an FM station before 
1950. 

A&P is currently testing in Pitts- 
burgh and Chicago. The Kroger chain, 
one of the food merchandising field's 
most active users of broadcasting, is 
also testing in Pittsburgh. Both of 
these chains are using copy for private fransitrddio 

brand items which they control. 

Most problems of equipment which 
have plagued storecasting operations 
have been overcome. The speakers lo- 
cated underneath food bins have been 

replaced with ceiling units well dis- Despite equipment problems which project of its kind, transitradio is 
tributed throughout the store. Receiv- would have defeated any other major moving along with amazing speed. It's 

the first time in the history of radio 
advertising that broadcasters have had 
an investment in receiving equipment. 
Music, news, and commercials are 
being fed to public service transporta- 
tion vehicles in 14 cities with Kansas 
City slated to be number 15 this fall. 
These are the areas served with the 
"official" brand of transitradio serv- 
ice. There are a number of inde- 
pendent operations and a few car-card 
sponsored transitradio operations also 
functioning. 

Stromberg-Carlson is building most 
of the equipment and with its experi- 
ence in building equipment that is re- 
quired to stand the hardest of service 
knocks, it's expected that the Rochester 
firm will be able to overcome the equip- 
ment failure problems which has beset 
some of the areas being transitradio 
served. 

The May list of transitradio spon- 
sors was nearly 500. Two hundred 
and fiftv-six of this half-thousand were 
signed by Transit Radio. Inc. since 
February of this year. While a high 
percentage of transitradio advertisers 
are local firms, many of them have 
been able to use this "captive audi- 
ence" form of aural advertising be- 
cause of the availability of dealer- 
I Please turn to page 87) 



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72 



SPONSOR 





names in new places 



Network ratings 

No new coverage maps but average 
ratings of net works indicate changes 






There are no new coverage maps 
of the four networks. Sometime this 
next December or January, the Broad- 
cast Measurement Bureau is expected 
to have the network report for the 
second BMB study available. Since 
BMB indices provide for recording the 
two important factors in coverage — 
the ability to hear a station and the 
desire to hear a program on that sta- 
tion — the report should indicate effec- 
tively the impact of recent switches in 
top programs. 

18 JULY 1949 



In lieu of any coverage basis on 
which to report network standing, the 
next best index as to how networks 
rank can be the Hooperating report 
(36) cities and the Hooper standing of 
each network in terms of "Total min- 
utes of rated sponsored time by net- 
work." 

The third week in February is usu- 
ally the peak of the listening season. A 
comparison of average evening Hoop- 
eratings ( 6 to 11 p.m. I between 15-21 
February 1948 and 1949 should show 



1948 


1949 


9.3 


9.3* 


10.2 


11.4" 


4.8 


4.1* 


13.8 


11.1 



the trend of listening at least in the 
big city telephone homes surveyed by 
Hooper. 

Average evening network commercial ratings 
(6-11 p.m.) 
15-21 February, 1948-1949 
Network 
ABC 
CBS 
MBS 
NBC 

* Does not include cooperative programs 

The relative standing of the four net- 
works is also indicated by the number 
of minutes they have sold during the 
week rated. 

Minutes of sponsored time 

(6-11 p.m.) 
15-21 February, 1948-1949 
Network 1948 1949 

ABC 1045 930 

CBS 1600 1560 

MBS 690 500 

NBC 1635 1575 

The spread between NBC and CBS 



71 






2tW0lk 



has been reduced during the 12 months 
but as of 15-21 February 1948 NBC 
still was ahead of CBS. Only a few 
of the programs which switched their 
networks had been on CBS for any 
length of time so the full impact, rat- 
ing wise, of the switch. Beside there 
are other programs due to make their 
CBS debut this fall which should in- 
tensify the switch towards Columbia. 
Naturally it all depends upon what 
NBC developes in the way of new 
programs. Hollywood Calling may 
build a great Sunday night listening 
habit just as Stop the Music has for 
ABC. A number of new NBC drama- 
tic programs show great promise in 
the audition stage. NBC is working 
hard also on a number of comedy 
variety programs and if it has any of 
the success that CBS has had with 
programs like My Friend lrma. the 
relative standing of the two networks 
can continue neck and neck as they 
have been for so many years. 

The second Hooper report for June 
in the average-evening-ratings of com- 
mercial programs gives a greater edge 
to CBS than the mid-season rating. 
Many of NBC's top programs were off 
the air when this report was made. 
Regardless of the reason, the four net- 
works had to face the following Hooper 
comparison: 

Average evening network commercial ratings 
(6-11 p.m.) 
15-21 June 1948-1949 

Network 1948 1949 

ABC 5.0 5.4 

CBS 6.0 6.5 

MBS 3.6 2.4 

NBC 7.3 5.5 

These "average ratings" cover the 
following minutes of sponsored pro- 



gram time: 

Minutes of sponsored time 
Hi-11 p.m.) 
15-21June 1948-1949 
Network 1948 1949 

ABC 755 765 

CBS 1335 1500 

MBS 540 360 

NBC I486 1485 

Thus for the summer, CBS appears 
to have been the network to have held, 
or sold, the largest number of com- 
mercial minutes. ABC had added ten 
minutes to its commercial time in 
June, with NBC holding its own and 
MBS suffering the greatest loss, 180 
minutes of commercial time. 

There's nothing static about broad- 
cast advertising from a network or 
any other basis. While Hooper figures 
have been used in this report to show 
what's happened since the last Fall 
Facts edition of SPONSOR was pub- 
lished. Nielsen's figures are reported 
to indicate just as great a shift in 
audience. The U.S. Hooperatings 
(Hooper's projectable ratings) do not, 
because of difference in network facili- 
ties, show as great a shift as the 36- 
City telephone coincidentals. U.S. 
Hooperatings were average figures for 
January-February 1949 and thus could 
not show the real effect of program 
shifts that started during the first week 
in January. 

There's no question but that the net- 
work picture is changing. The only 
possible way to make certain that a 
time-buy is the best is to know what 
happened last week and have the fig- 
ures of what happened a year ago as 
a comparison. 

Everything is relative, but don't de- 
pend on last year's data. * * * 



Net -built programs 

All chains now building their own shows 
in industry's program sweepstakes 



With house-built packages increas- 
ingly important to web economy, net- 
works are still sharing with agencies 
and independent producers the show- 
man's mantle they donned three years 
ago after their gradual abdication over 
the years. House-built shows will be a 
major factor in NBC program tactics 
this fall, just as they have been at CBS. 
ABC will rely strongly on its own pack- 
ages in its drive to capture audiences 
— and sponsors — with budget-con- 
scious programs. Part of ABC strategy 



is to make Wednesday night the mys- 
tery-adventure session of the week. 

Mutual, with revamped program de- 
partment and program policies, w ill at- 
tempt to compete for radio ears by 
applying the block-programing tech- 
nique to both day and night sequences. 

The new program outlook for MBS 
is sparked by program director Wil- 
liam Fineshriber. who moved over 
from Columbia where he was program 
department manager. Fineshriber plans 
to apply program-building and mood 



sequencing principles established dur- 
ing the years he worked with CBS pro- 
grams. 

This won't mean an overnight revo- 
lution in MBS programing. Renova- 
tion will start from stratch in Septem- 
ber and proceed gradually. Another 
approach will be to add a sprinkling 
of shows with star appeal. 

No network program executive 
thinks agency and independent pro- 
ducers can't (or shouldn't! take a 
major role in producing shows for 
network sponsors. They'll privately 
admit it keeps them on their toes. 
Nets can often produce shows in a 
given price bracket more economicallv 
by using staff people who have sev- 
eral assignments. They also have more 
opportunities to give a program air 
time to build an audience. Sponsors 
are less resistent to buying a show r they 
can't control I move to another net- 
work, if it is built up on the air before 
it is offered them ) . 

But networks have to have proved 
audience producers, whatever the 
source. They feel they have what it 
takes to produce audiences: creative 
people and facilities for testing and 
showcasing. * + * 



Independent packages 

Producers not too 
radio interested 

This year shows a sharp down- 
ward swing in the number of live pack- 
age programs available from inde- 
pendent producers. One reason for the 
quantitative decline in this field is the 
constantly increasing number of net- 
work-built programs. Independent pro- 
ducers are more and more up against 
network feeling that the webs' ability 
to build a show and keep it running 
and increasing its audience is most 
important in establishing salable prop- 
erties for sponsors. 

With the greater number of net- 
produced programs, and the resultant 
decrease in time availabilities, the in- 
dependents are turning to TV produc- 
tion. In some cases, independent pro- 
ducers offer AM and TV versions of 
the same show; in other instances, in- 
dependent concentration is on TV sole- 
ly. The latter course might seem to be 
the ultimate salvation for independent 
producers. * + * 






74 



SPONSOR 




A 



• LL the bells in Bellingham won't make more 
noise for you in this Washington fishing center than 
ABC. For ABC rings the bell with 69% of all the radio 
families there, says BMB. In 42 Coast towns (inside and 
outside) ABC has 50% or better BMB penetration. 




B 



UZZING DOWN to California, we find all the roses 
in Santa Rosa hardly outnumber the ABC fans there. It's 
a honey of an audience, says BMB, for 81% of the radio 
families are regular ABC listeners. Big towns or small, 
on ABC you reach them all (and sell 'em) . 




ounting ALL the Marys in Marysville is a cinch 
compared to totting up the ABC fans there. Yet BMB did 
it and found 72% of this California town's radio families 
have the ABC habit... and it's a good one for you to get, 
too, if you want primary coverage of 96.7% of all Coast 
radio families. 



On the coast you cant get away from 

ABC 



FOR COVERAGE . . . ABC's booming Pacific network 
delivers 228,000 watts of power— 49,250 more than the 
second-place network. This power spells coverage — 
ABC primary service area (BMB 50% or better) covers 
96.7% of all Pacific Coast radio homes. And ABC's 
Coast Hooper for 1948 was up 9% of better both day 
and night. 

FOR COST.. .a half hour on ABC's full 22-station Pacific 
network costs only $1,228.50. Yet you can buy as few 
as 5 stations for testing or concentration. And ABC 
is famous for the kind of audience-building promotion 
that helps slice the cost-per-listener. 

Whether you're on a coast network 
or intend to be— talk to ABC 



ABC 



PACIFIC NETWORK 

New York: 7 West 66th St. • TRafalgar 3-7000 — Detroit: 1700 Stroh Bldg. ■ CHerry 8321 — Chicago: 20 N. Wacker Dr. 
DEIaware 1900— Los Angeles: 6363 Sunset Blvd. ■ HUdson 2-3141— San Francisco: 155 Montgomery St. * EXbrook 2-6544 



18 JULY 1949 



75 



Availahh* liul«*p«Mi€leiit Live* Package Programs 



TITLE TYPE 


APPEAL 


TIME 


PRICE 


DESCRIPTION 


PRODUCER AND OR 
SALES REPRESENTATIVE 


ACT FOUR Aud partic 


Family 


15-min,2-3/wk 


On request 


People's critiques of plays or movies in interviews 


Sels Prodns 


ADVENTURES OF FU MANCHU 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Dramatization of the famed Sax Rohmer stories 


Basel] Radio & TV Prodns 


BACK HOME AGAIN 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2000 


Folk-music show featuring radio name acts 


W. M. Ellsworth 


BATTLE OF WORDS 


Quiz 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2500 


Unique quiz program with new twists 


Roy W. Dickson 


BIG JOES HAPPINESS EXCHANGE 


Disk Jockey 


Family 


3-hrs, 7 wk 


On request 


Disk-jockey show with a public-service angle 


WOR, N.Y. 


CIRCLE C RANCH 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$200(1 


Western variety musical with DeZurik Sisters 


M. W. Ellsworth 


CROSSROADS 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Audience determines outcome of suspense mysteries 


Gainsborough Assocs 


DREAM STREET 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Dramatic show with a dream format 


Basch Radio & TV Prodns 


FOX AND HOUNDS 


Aud partic 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Part of audience participates, shares in profits 


Basch Radio & TV Prodns 


WALTER GREENTREE 


I '"i I> 


Family 


30-min, bwk 


On request 


Stars Eddie Mayehoff as small-town store-owner 


John E. Gibbs 


GUESS APPEARANCE 


Aud partic 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Quiz show with laughs, prizes, and forfeits 


Basch Radio & TV Prodns 


HELP YOUR NEIGHBOR 


Talk 


\\ nmeii 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Judy Logan with informal chit-chat, interviews 


Sels Prodns 


HERE'S HEIDY 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-30-min, 1-5/wk 


On request 


Fantasies, childhood tales narrated by Heidy Mayer 


Gainsborough Assocs 


HINT HUNT 


Aud partic 


Women 


30-min, 5/wk 


$3350 


Chuck Acree show with strong feminine appeal 


Feature Prodns 


HORATIO ALGER, JR 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2500 


Meretoforc untold stories of the famous Alger 


Charles Michelson 


HOUSE OF DISTINCTION 


Drama 


Women 


15-min, 2-3-5/wk 


$1500-$2000 


Serial juilt around beauty-salon proprietress 


Lewis & Bowman 


LAFF LAB 


Comedy 


Family 


15-min, 1/wk 


$1750 


Bill Thompson emulates people's foibles 


Mitchell Gertz 


WILLIAM LANG 


News 


Family 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Newsworthy feature stories narrated by Lang 


Claude Barrere 


LET'S PLAY REPORTER 


Aud partic 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


On request 


Quiz show with newspaper-office background 


Basch Radio & TV Prodns 


MASKED SPOONER. THE 


Musical 


Women 


15-min, 1-3, wk 


On request 


Much-puolicized Spooner does romantic songs 


Jack Rourke Prodns 


MEET MY SISTER 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Comedian Eddie Mayehoff, Betty and Jane Kean 


John E. Gibbs 


MERRY GO ROUND QUIZ 


Aud partic 


Juvenile 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2000 


Children's quiz, comedy characters asking questions 


Junior Programs, Inc. 


MOVIE AWARD 


Aud partic 


Fam ily 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Quiz questions based en film stars and stories 


Jack Rourke Prodns 


MUSIC BOX TALES 


Musical 


Juvenile 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2500 


Humorous fairytales in operetta form 


Junior Programs, Inc. 


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS 


Narrative 


Juvenile 


15-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Narrations for youngsters by William Lang 


Claude Barrere 


QUIZ BALL 


Aud partic 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$3500 


General quiz; two teams in baseoall setting 


Feature Prodns 


SEARCH FOR A STAR 


Drama 


Adult 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Search for movie talent via auditions 


John E. Gibbs 


SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT 


News 


Fam ily 


30-min, 1 wk 


$1600 


Unusual news items, human-interest stories 


Feature Prodns 


STATE FAIR 


Variety 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4500 


Barn-dance type of program; community singing 


Leslie Clucas 


THOSE WEBSTERS 


Comedy 


Family 


30-min, 1 wk 


$4500 


Family-type situation comedy 


Leslie Clucas 


THREE THIRDS OF A GHOST 


Aud partic 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Well-known spelling game adapted to radio 


Feature Prodns 


TOM SAWYER SMITH 


Drama 


Juvenile 


30-min, 1/wk 


$1500 


Two boys trying to live Tom Sawyer's adventures 


Junior Programs, Inc. 


WHAT DO YOU THINK? 


Drama 


Family 


30-min, 1-3-5 /wk 


On request 


True cases of mental and psychic phenomena 


Basch Radio & TV Prodns 


WHIRLAGIG 


Drama 


Juvenile 


15-min, 5/wk 


$2500 


Suspense and humor stories for 8-14 years olds 


Junior Programs, Inc. 


DON WRIGHT CHORUS 


Musical 


Family 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Familiar music by 14-voice mixed choir 


S. W. Caldwell 



REGIONAL NETWORKS 

(Continued from page 52) 

While this doesn't hold true of base- 
hall, it is on the other hand necessary 
to hand-tailor the nets for following a 
specific team in order to realize the 
maximum from fan interest in each 
club. 

One of the earliest users of the cus- 
tom-built web for sports is Atlantic 
Refining Company that is famous in 
the East for collecting on the fierce 
loyalities of high school as well as 
collegiate sports fans. They have also 
sponsored Boston's two major league 
baseball teams in New England with 
Narragansett Brewing Company. Most 
of Atlantic's approximately s,'i( )().()!)() 
a year for broadcasting is spent for 



custom-built nets for baseball and 
football. 

The kind of event leading itself best 
to the per-occasion web is one that 
would lose its impact unless aired live. 
Obviously such a net isn't ordinarily 
put together where existing facilities 
cover the area desired and where rival 
commitments interfere. The fact that 
such instances do often interfere makes 
the regional custom-built chain a must 
for certain advertisers. -* * + 



INDEPENDENT STATIONS 

{Continued from page 46) 

borhoods that does intensive selling 
within its own bailiwicks. It may be Eli 
Godofsky's WHLI at Hempstead, N. Y.. 
WFAS in White Plains, N. Y., or 



WPAT in Paterson, N. J. Or it may be 
a station in Chester, Pa., or any one 
of hundreds of stations on the fringe of 
a great city, yet dedicated to the pro- 
blems of its own 25 miles. The sta- 
tion will not have a Hope, a Benny, 
a Lux Radio Theater, a Stop the Music 
or a Shadow, but it will have an aware- 
ness of the need of its community and 
it will do something about it. 

It's a more difficult problem to buy 
time on independent stations than it 
is on network outlets. That's because 
networks have a leavening effect on 
their stations. There is a great variation 
in the effectiveness of NBC stations for 
instance, but there is apt to be more 
variation than in the case of inde- 
pendents. The non-network stations 
are sometimes very good and they are 
sometimes just apologies for broad- 



76 



SPONSOR 




Ugh... no (sob) ...KJR" 




KJR doesn't reach everybody! 

But KJR does blanket the rich western Washington market, 
where 1,321,100 radio listeners enjoy one of the world's 
richest-per-capita incomes. 

Best of all, KJR's 5000 watts at 950 kc. cover the import- 
ant area that any 50,000 watts would reach (check your 
BMB). 

And "the beauty of it is" — it costs YOU so much LESS! 

Talk with AVERY-KNODEL, Inc., about KIR! 

for Western Washington. ..An Affiliate of the 
American Broadcasting Company 



18 JULY 1949 



77 




fan Sec°« d - 

• Highest Percentage 
increase in Hooper 
Ratings* 



Lowest cost per 
thousand Radio Homes 



Serving 90% of the 
market at 50% of 
regional rates. 



* Only Savannah station to 
show an increase in all 
rated time periods. 
(Hooper Station Audience 
Index -Fall 1948) 



Ask any Adam J. Young 
office for all details. 




cast advertising outlets. Because many 
of them haven't BMB coverage reports 
as set. and because the BMB reports 
that many do have do not accurately 
reflect their impact, a timebuyer must 
personally know each independent or 
else buy mongrels along with pedi- 
greed stock. 

The reason why BMB reports fre- 
quently do not reflect the real impact 
of the non-network stations is because 
many of these independents do not 
have star names to capture the imagi- 
nation of their listeners. They just 
day-in and day-out program music, 
news, and sports that the listeners want. 
It's the Bennys. Hopes, and Charlie 
McCarthys who plant themselves in the 
memories of their fans. These name 
programs help to implant the call let- 
ters of the stations over which they are 
heard in the minds of listeners. They 
build good BMBs. It's more difficult 
for a non-network station to achieve 
this recognition. Even if an inde- 
pendent is among the top-rated sta- 
tions, it's apt to have a far greater audi- 
ence that its index indicates. 

For years it has been admitted that 
the independent stations with baseball, 
basketball, football, and hockey gath- 
ered audiences. Emphasis was usual- 
ly on the baseball broadcasting and 
naturally on the fact that this meant 
only top daytime audiences. That's 
changed now. Baseball is just as much 
a nighttime event as it is a daytime. 



Transcriptions 



and the baseball audience for the night 
games is many times what it is for 
the daytime innings. Football hasn't 
become as much a night game as base- 
ball. \et Friday nights in many sec- 
tions of the country during the football 
seasons see great listening audiences 
tuned to the Friday night college 
games. Professional football is switch- 
ing a little bit at a time to the "under 
lights" routine, and it too will con- 
tribute to the audiences of non-net- 
work stations. Its possible for the 
webs to carry Saturday afternoon foot- 
ball games because the networks gen- 
erally haven't been too successful in 
selling Saturday p.m. time. Friday 
night, on the other hand, has been a 
good network commercial time. There 
isn't any one of the seven nights a 
week on which a network could afford 
to broadcast a football game. Then 
it must also be considered that the 
"big" games are for the most part 
games with local or regional appeal. 
There are very few games, even Bowl 
games, that appeal to the entire na- 
tion. Thus they build great audiences 
for non-network stations because these 
independents broadcast home team 
games. 

Buying broadcast advertising time is 
the toughest media assignment at any 
agency. It's the hard-fighting, big- 
audience-delivering non-network sta- 
tions that have made it so difficult. 
(TV hasn't helped either. I * + * 



Bettor names, better prices, better 
use of library services, mark Fall 1949 



ABC AFFILIATE 

Winner 1948 George Foster Peabody 
Award for Outstanding Public 
Service by a local station. 



Despite the fact that radio is being 
unreasonably and inaccurately sold 
short in the face of the growing tele- 
vision onslaught, the transcription 
field is heading into what appears 
unquestionably to be its biggest year. 

One strong factor that will make 
the 1949-50 season a banner year for 
e.t.'s is the considerably improved 
quality of syndicated transcriptions. 
Up to this year there was very little 
available among recorded programs 
that was really new. The trend was 
toward proved vehicles which in many 
cases had been available for years. 

That picture is changing n«w. New 
quality shows are being made avail- 
able by top e.t. firms like Frederic W. 
Ziv. Harry S. Goodman Productions. 



and the Bruce Eells-administered 
Broadcasters Program Syndicate. Ziv's 
expansion is best exemplified by the 
new and successful Meet the Menjous 
Mr.-and-Mrs. program I screen actor 
Adolphe Menjou and his wife. \ erree 
Teasdale l . Goodmans Rendezvous 
uith David Ross and Jim Ameche, 
Story-teller are both brand-new pro- 
ductions of network caliber. 

Broadcasters Program Syndicate, 
formed last year, offers its 150 station 
members programs such as Pat 
O'Brien From Hollywood and Frontier 
Town, plus 73 other program series. 
Another major move in the e.t. field 
is the entrance of Metro Goldwyn- 
Maver Badio Attractions with eight 
new top-talent transcribed programs 



73 



SPONSOR 




starting about 1 September. All with 
a Hollywood slant, and utilizing 
MGM's stars and properties, these 
shows will be offered to stations at a 
lower cost than any other programs of 
comparable quality, according to MGM 
Radio Attractions. 

More and more transcribed shows 
are now available for a greater number 
of weeks and a greater number of 
times a week. Advertisers thus have 
the opportunity to make their sponsor- 
ship of these programs mean much 
more over a 52-week period than they 
could over 13 weeks. Pricing e.t. shows 
in keeping with station costs is still 
another factor in the increased import- 
ance of syndicated transcriptions in 
agency and advertiser plans. 

The disk-jockey fad of a year ago 
has simmered down considerably. The 
1949-50 e.t. outlook shows nothing like 
the 1948 scramble of name bandlead- 
ers such as Tommy Dorsey and Duke 
Ellington to do transcribed programs. 
This significantly points up the fact 
that disk-jockey shows are primarilv 
a local-station operation. 

There's no doubt that the coming 
season will be a transcription year. 
That's because more quality and care 
are going into their production, and 
prices are being kept commensurate 
with station time costs. 

There is still a major problem that 
faces a sponsor or an agency that de- 
sires to find the ideal vehicle for a 
specific product in a specific market. 
There's no central transcription clear- 
ing house to which the advertiser or his 
agency can turn to obtain audition 
disks of the available programs of the 
type best suited to his product or his 
market. Even when the advertising 
radio director finds a program which 
he feels fills the sponsor's need he often 
as not finds that it's not free in the 
very markets he must cover. 

The Fall Facts transcription direc- 
tory covers five full pages, yet sponsor 
makes no pretense that it's complete. 
Even if it were, there is no indication 
that it's available in the markets that 
a specific advertiser desires, or that it's 
the ideal show for the product involved. 
Yet the directory is the most complete 
of its kind. Every program listed is 
actually on disk. Every series indexed 
is complete and ready to go to work 
for an advertiser. There are no "if" 
programs among the many hundreds 
reported. 

It's time for a transcription clearing 
house. * * * 



(eve 



frtthStuff 



That Makes SALES! 



p p 




WIOD's e nergy is 

directed up and down 
the Florida East Coast -- the most 
heavily populated section of 
Florida. This is your market! 

Check the backgroun 
and the history of WIOD. Learn 
why WIOD is the top station in 
Southeast Florida.. .by every count! 

For a complete and 
detailed analysis of the radio 
situation in Miami. ..call our Rep. 

George P. Hollingbery Co. 



James M. LeGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC 




WMT couldn't locate 
an account exec in Agency 



(IOWA) 




. . . but there are plenty of big time 
buyers there. They buy what they 
need — and have enough to buy 
what they want, because necessities 
and luxuries are amply provided 
for in their high per capita income. 
Agency, plus a thousand other com- 
munities, add up to WMTland, one 
of the nation's most prosperous 
markets, well-balanced with farm 
and industry income, well-covered 
with Iowa's best frequency — 600 kc. 

Though far from Fifth Avenue, 
the 1,121,782 people within WMT's 
2.5 mv line are worth the attention 
of agency men interested in ex- 
panding markets. Get full details 
from the Katz man about Eastern 
Iowa's exclusive CBS outlet. 



t 



>*sX>K*v. 



"**wVe»C 



^*>cv*^v«^ 






■»^pa» >m3\.>^a 






WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Watts 600 KC. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 



18 JULY 1949 



79 



over-all 



Contests and offers 

Smaller direct-result sales promotions 
replace giant prestige give-aways 



The mammoth radio contests of 
previous years, almost without excep- 
tion, were not a factor last season in 
the promotion plans of the country's 
leading broadcast advertisers. Instead. 
the emphasis in the mid-1948-1949 
period was on smaller contests, run 
more frequently. A sizeable increase 
in the number of premium offers on 
the air, both in radio and TV, could 
be traced almost directly to buyers' 
markets in foods, drugs, cigarettes, 
and soaps, fields in which the seller no 
longer had things all his own way. 
With the success of the contest-charity 
drives of Truth Or Consequences (the 
various switches on the original "Mrs. 
Hush'' idea I on the record, there was 
an increase too among contest-users of 
the various forms of promotions and 
air contests that tied-in with national 
charity drives. At the local and re- 
gional levels of broadcast advertis- 
ing, the various contests and offers 
continued to be largely a reflection of 
what was being done nationally. 

The first major contest of 1949 was 
a Lever Brothers affair, which offered 
travel-hungry Americans a world 
cruise (or $10,000 cash!, 15 round- 
trip jaunts to Europe, and other cash 
prizes. Although the two-line jingle 
contests run by Lever during 1948 
worked well, the travel contest took 
the familiar form of the 25-word letter 
requirements. The contest received 
wide promotion, being plugged on all 
of the various Lever nighttime net- 
work shows. 

Helbros, a new figure in the air 
contest field, offered a Kaiser-Frazer 
car and an all-expense trip to New 
York as the big prize in a somewhat 
similar contest aimed at Americans 
who have an urge to travel a bit. Like 
Lever's travel contest. Helbros' contest 
also used a 25-word letter. 

Procter & Gamble, perhaps the larg- 
est user of contests and offers in 
broadcast advertising (8-12 big pro- 
motions annually; smaller premium 
offers every few weeks), combined the 
straight "Name-so-and-so" type con- 
test and the premium offer during 
the spring season of 1949. Three 
P&G wrappers or boxtops brought the 
contestant a package of new-type red 
zinnia seeds. At the same time, a con- 



test was held for a name for the new 
flower, with $25,000 as the first prize 
(Total prizes: $50,000.) The contest 
was promoted via eight P&G daytime 
serials. To break any ties, contestants 
had to write the usual 25-word letter 
about their "favorite P&G product for 
housecleaning," a bit of promotional 
timeliness that P&G uses every spring 
when American homemakers spring- 
clean their homes. 

Largest straight contest in the 1948- 
1949 period covered in this report was 
that of Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, which 
ran a " '49 Gold Rush Contest" on 
three network nighttime programs. 
For a wrapper and a 25-word letter 
about any C-P-P soap product, listen- 
ers had a crack at a $100,000 prize 
list, with a first prize of $49,000. 
This C-P-P contest was the only one 
among network advertisers that made 
any serious attempt to battle the big 
jackpot come-ons of give-away shows 
like Stop The Music and Hollyivood 
Calling, the major reason for the fall- 
ing-off of mammoth money-prize con- 
tests among national air advertisers. 

The contest-charity promotions were 
bigger and better. Typical of these 
was the contest run on Jimmy Fidler's 
Hollywood gossip show by Carter 
Products. A "Mystery Star" had to be 
identified from air clues, after which 
listeners wrote a 10-word slogan and 
sent it in with a contribution for the 
"National Kid's Day Foundation," a 
project near and dear to Fidler's heart. 
Ralph Edwards had another series of 
charity tie-ins, one of the outstanding 
being the "Whispering Woman" gim- 
mick ( She had to be identified on a 
long-distance call to listeners). Lis- 
teners wrote letters urging support of 
the American Heart Association, send- 
ing a contribution with it. Best letters 
received weekly got the pay-off call. 
Recently. Lever Brothers whooped it 
up for a charity-type promotion in 
which listeners to Bob Hope's show 
mailed in two Swan wrappers to 
Levers. For every two wrappers sent 
in, the soap firm sent a cake of Swan 
overseas to needy families. Although 
it was a necessary and worthy cause, 
and the public received nothing, it still 
sold over 1.000.000 cakes of Swan. 

Procter & Gamble bad a similar, if 



los international, promotion in the 
early summer of 1949. Church groups, 
women's clubs. Boy Scout troops dis- 
covered, via P&G's nighttime and day- 
time shows, that they could raise 
money for themselves by collecting 
P&G wrappers. P&G paid off on Duz, 
Ivory Flakes, and Camay boxtops and 
wrappers at the rate of Yzi apiece, 
with cash awards in addition for the 
largest collections in various states. 
Preliminary reports show that the pro- 
motion was a success. 

Bromo-Seltzer, a frequent buyer of 
broadcast advertising, modelled a na- 
tional sales contest on radio and TV 
air contests. Druggists only were of- 
fered $2,500 in prizes in a campaign 
designed to promote Bromo-Seltzer as 
a good seller. The requirements: Set 
up a "Profit Planagram" display dur- 
ing the run of the contest; complete a 
25-word letter beginning — "I consider 
Bromo-Seltzer a good display item 
because ..." It boosted sales inter- 
est, but radio gets credit for the air- 
originated formula. 

Radio and TV premium promotions, 
primarily sampling devices and quick 
methods of capitalizing on weeks of 
steady air-selling for a product, are 
on the upswing. Two of the latest 
efforts in this field are typical of the 
promotional field days that good pre- 
miums afford. Lever Brothers is cur- 
rently promoting a tie-in between 
themselves and Westinghouse Electric. 
In return, some 60.000 Westinghouse 
dealers are arranging promotions with 
local grocers. Under the plan, the 
housewife who sends two wrappers or 
boxtops to Lever will get a certificate 
worth $2.00 toward the purchase of 
a wide line of Westinghouse appli- 
ances. Lever Vp Walter McKee en- 
thusiastically calls the promotion: 
"... one of the most powerful sales- 
building devices in the history of soap 
and shortening advertisings." Airwise. 
the promotion will be plugged heavily 
on Big Town and Aunt Jenny during 
July and August, months traditionally 
"off" as far as appliance sales go For 
this reason, the promotion is a hit w ith 
Westinghouse dealers. 

This month too. Kellogg, one of the 
largest of cereal broadcast advertisers, 
is promoting a new series of on-the- 
package premiums that is based on a 
tie-in promotion. On the bottom of the 
new Kellogg Variety Package is the 
first of a series of movie star and cos- 
tume cut-outs. On the sides of the 
individual boxes are more cut-outs of 
{Please turn to page 86) 



80 



SPONSOR 



networ 






Available Network Package Programs 



TITLE 


TYPE 


APPEAL 
Familj 


NET 


TIME 


PRICE 


TESTED? 


EXPLANATION 


MEL ALLEN 


Sports 


MBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$500 


Yes 


Interviews, news scores 


AS OTHERS SEE US 


News 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, l,wk 


$1300-11800 


Yes 


As foreign radio and press see I . S. 


B-BAR BRANCH 


Drama 


Juvenile 


MBS 


30-min, /wk 


On request 


Yes 


Adventures of 12-year-old ranch owner 


BEAT THE CLOCK 


Quiz 


Family 


CBS 


25-min, 5/wk 


$350O-$4500 


Yes 


As clock ticks prizes decrease 


BIG TOP 


Drama 


Juvenile 


MBS 


30-niin, 3/wk 


$2000 


Yes 


Circus adventures of youthful hero 


BREAKFAST WITH BURROUGHS 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


Yes 


Starring 1 oy friend of girl with the three blue eyes 


BROADWAY'S MY BEAT 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4000-$5000 


Yes 


Mystery with Times Square background 


CHARLES COLLINGWOOD 


News 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$925 


Yes 


1 p.m. news and commentary 


BILLCOSTELLO 


News 


Family 


CBS 


10-min, 1/wk 


$950-$ 1050 


Yes 


Sunday morning headlines at 11:05 a.m. 


RICHARD DIAMOND 


Detective 


Adult 


NBC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$5000 


Yes 


Dick Powell as a "Private Eye" 


JOHNNY DOLLAR 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4600 


Yes 


Wages of crime is disillusionment — dollar-wise 


DRAGNET 


Detective 


Adult 


NBC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4000 


Yes 


Based on actual police cases 


EARN YOUR VACATION 


Quiz 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4200-$5000 


Yes 


Contestants limited to school teachers 


ELEANOR AND ANNA 


Commentary 


Adult 


ABC 


15-min, 5/wk 


$2500 


Yes 


Mrs. FDR & daughter 


ESCAPE 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4000-$5000 


Yes 


Classic tales of high adventure 


THE EYE 


Detective 


Adult 


ABC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$1900 


Yes 


Terror of the underworld 


GARDEN GATE 


Commentary 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$1200 


Yes 


Old Dirt Dobber on how to grow things 


GREEN LAMA 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4000-$5000 


Yes 


Mystery adventure series 


IT PAYS TO BE IGNORANT 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$8000-$9000 


Yes 


Tom Howard's famous slapstick session 


LADIES BE SEATED 


Aud partic 


Adult 


ABC 


30-min, 5/wk 


$2675 


Yes 


Starring Tom Moore 


HAWK LARABEE 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$26OO-$370O 


Yes 


Western adventure in resettled ghost town 


LEAVE IT TO JOAN 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$9500 


Yes 


New series starring Joan Davis 


LARRY LESUEUR 


News 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$1000 


Yes 


Saturday's news to 6:45 


LIFE WITH LUIGI 


Comedy 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$9000 


Yes 


Life lightly hectic 


JOHNNY LUJACK 


Drama 


Juvenile 


ABC 


30-min, 3/wk 


$2950 


Yes 


Notre Dame star in kid strip 


ROBERT Q.LEWIS 


Variety 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 5/wk 


$8000 


Yes 


Lewisian whimsy a la zany 


MAKE BELIEVE TOWN 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


On request 


No 


Stories with Hollywood background, each episode complete 


MARTIN & LEWIS 


Comedy 


Family 


NBC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$10,000 


Yes 


Situation comedy 


MEET YOUR MATCH 


Aud partic 


Family 


MBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$1750 


Yes 


Musical quiz 


MODERN ROMANCES 


Drama 


Adult 


ABC 


30-min, 5/wk 


$4200 


Yes 


Based on stories from Modern Romances magazine 


MY GOOD WIFE 


Comedy 


Family 


NBC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$5000 


Yes 


Family situation comedy revolving around wife 


MY SILENT PARTNER 


Comedy 


Family 


NBC 


30-min, 1/wk | $ 5000 


Yes 


Faye Emerson, not quite silent 


PHILIP MARLOWE 


Detective 


Adult 


CBS- 


30-min, 1/wk 


$4150 


Yes 


Emphasizing mystery angle 


J OHNNY OLSEN'S GET TOGETHER 


Aud partic 


Family 


ABC 


60-min, 1/wk 


$2000 


Yes 


Fun & prizes 


POOLE'S PARADISE 


Musical 


Family 


MBS 


25-min, 5/wk 


On request 


Yes 


Records, chatter 


JIMMY POWERS 


Sports 


Family 


MBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$300 


Yes 


Interviews, news scores 


ROMANCE 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$300O-$4O00 


Yes 


Stories of love and romance 


LANNYROSS 


Musical 


Family 


MBS 


15-min, 5/wk 


$2500 


Yes 


With Bobby White & group 


SING IT AGAIN 


Quiz 


Family 


CBS 


60-min, 1/wk 


$3700 per % hr 


Yes 


Similar to Stop The Music; phone gimmick 


JAY STEWART'S FUN FAIR 


Aud partic 


Family 


ABC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$880 


Yes 


Kids and their pets 


STRIKE IT RICH 


Quiz 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1 wk 


$5500-$6000 


Yes 


Pyramiding cash prizes instead of merchandise 


TELL IT AGAIN 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


$2600-$3000 


Yes 


Adaptations of famous junior classics 


THIS IS BROADWAY 


Variety 


F'amily 


CBS 


60-min, l,wk 


On request 


Yes 


Talent clinic 


THINK FAST 


Aud partic 


Adult 


ABC 


30-min, 1/wk 


$1500 


Yes 


Can you stump the experts? 


TWIN VIEWS OF NEWS 


News 


Family 


MBS 


15-min. 1/wk 


$650 


Yes 


Hy Gardner & Danton Walker 


WHERE THE PEOPLE STAND 


Opinion 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, 1/wk 


$1200 


Yes 


Vox pop on questions in the news 


YOU AND.. 


Interview 


Family 


CBS 


15-min, 5/wk 


$2000 


Yes 


Authorities on topics of health and happiness 


YOU ARE THERE 


Drama 


•Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1 , wk 


$5900 


Yes 


Simulating radio coverage of famous historical events 


YOUNG LOVE 


Drama 


Family 


CBS 


30-min, 1/wk 


-•.-.in in 


Yes 


Situation comedy with college background 



18 JULY 1949 



81 







Rata: take your pick 



Research 

Radio inspired survey still the best 
media research in advertising business 



Research has moved along substan- 
tially since sponsor's 1948 Fall Facts 
issue came off the press. Nielsen has 
changed from a partial U.S. report of 
listening to network programs to a 
service that covers all but 3'/< of 
the U.S.A. (the Mountain States). The 
1949 U.S. Hooperatings. despite an 
increased diary sample and a greater 
coincidental telephone home sample, 
did not find the universal acceptance 
that Hooper had hoped for his pro- 
jectable ratings. Radox. the Sindlinger 
system, has yet to grow beyond Phila- 
delphia, and Sindlinger's present lim- 
ited capital may hold back the de- 
velopment of his system, as it has thus 
far. 

CBS's radar-inspired research sys- 
tem hasn't come out of the Columbia 



82 



laboratories and while the other net- 
works have evinced interest in the sys- 
tem, which would have to be four- 
network supported to cover expenses, 
it's a research method for the future 
rather than for today. 

Pulse, the roster-recall research 
method, has expanded to six cities, the 
latest city being Washington, and has 
added acceptance for its monthly re- 
ports, due at least in part to its being 
pushed by CBS in the cities in which 
it operates. 

Nielsen is speeding up his opera- 
tions. As soon as all the Audimeters 
which require Nielsen researchers to 
pick up tapes are replaced by Audi- 
meters which permit the tapes being 
mailed the time lag between broad- 
cast and Nielsen rating will be cut. 



Nielsens Audimeters are being re- 
located on an area-sample rather than 
the group-sample basis which he has 
used for years and the report is cer- 
tain to be more statisically sound than 
it has been. Nielsen will continue to re- 
port all the data that he has in the 
past, with the figure representing lis- 
tening at least five minutes being called 
the Nielsen Rating. The other two NRI 
reports will be "Total Audience." and 
"Average Minute" listening audience. 

Nielsen delivers figures not available 
from any other source. They include 
"commercial audience." listeners who 
heard commercials on a program, and 
"homes per dollar." a figure which 
takes into consideration talent and net 
time costs to indicate just what an ad- 
vertiser is getting for his money. Niel- 
sen's "pantr\ check-ups" help relate 
advertising to buying in a way that 
few other studies in any other adver- 
tising medium are able to do. 

In TV research, everybody is in the 
act. Agencies, networks, all the regu- 

SPONSOR 



lar radio research organizations and 
most of the colleges with radio and 
television departments are making 
news with their studies. 

Hooper is first with his Network 
TV-Hooperatings and his regular semi- 
monthly pocket pieces contain not only 
radio network and non-network station 
shares of audience but TV audience 
share figures as well. Because Hoop- 
er's 36-City base for his radio report 
covers also a high percentage of the 
cities in which TV sets are installed 
in quantity, the growth of television 
can be Hooper reported twice a month. 
His TV-Hooperatings. in its third re- 
lease, covered 31 cities, the June re- 
port covered 33 and the July report 
is said to cover 37 cities. 

Hooper not only reports network 
TV audiences in his monthly TV- 
Hooperatings but city-by-city data as 
well. His figures not only show the size 
of the TV audience but he also reports 
standings for programs on a TV home 
base, thus making it possible for a 
sponsor to evaluate the quality of his 
program. If Hooper were only to re- 
lease ratings on a random-home basis, 
all programs would show increasing 
audiences and ratings simply because 
the number of TV homes is jumping 



NOW! 




•^ite- J2 COUNTIES OF 

prosperous Mark Twain Land 

ILLINOIS • IOWA • MISSOURI 
NATIONAL REP. — JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 



CEED> 



cMaLu^ lAitUxnA 



1070 KC 

i 1 1 1 1 1 1 



IOOO WATTS */ NITI 



daily. Only by basing a rating on TV 
homes is it possible to guage show 
quality. 

Hooper's TV ratings cover not only 
network shows but station-by-station 
ratings. Thus its possible to judge the 
impact of each TV station in each city 
he covers at the same time that pro- 
grams are being checked on a national 
basis. Hooper reports that he lost 95' < 
of the cost of his first TV report. His 
losses are expected to be reduced with 
each successive issue. 

Pulse interviewers cover both TV 
and radio when they ring door bells 
and Dr. Roslow's figures are not based 
upon telephone homes but on a cross- 
section of all homes. He issues share- 



of-TY -audience figures as well as share 
of total audience reports. 

The first Nielsen TV-report was ex- 
pected in March but while TV is be- 
ing measured by Nielsen, his tele- 
vision reports are not being issued yet, 
except as trial runs and as confidential 
indices. 

Agencies and colleges are devoting 
most of their studies to the effect of 
TV on living habits. Newell-Emmett 
has a video town in which living habits 
are being carefully monitored. Set 
ownership and other data have just 
been released by the agency in its 
second videotown report. 

There is no question but that tele- 
vision is growing up under the glare 



Wmi 



LOOKING FOR A BARGAIN IN RADIO? 
WBNS HAS IT IN CENTRAL OHIO— 

Yes, for just 74$ per thousand tuned-in homes you can broad- 
cast your sales message to this rich Central Ohio area. It's 
low cost advertising with high results. That's because WBNS 
has the listening audience of Central Ohio ... an audience 
that goes out and buys your product when they "Hear it on 
WBNS." 

• 

TOP TEN COLUMBUS HOOPERATINGS 
AGAIN PROVE WBNS LEADERSHIP— 

Hooperatings — Winter-Spring 1948-49 — Monday thru Friday day- 
time, show the top ten to be WBNS programs. Another demon- 
stration of the station's intensive coverage of Central Ohio. 

• 

BILL ZIPFS "FARMTIME"— 
TOP DAYTIME HOOPER 
FOR LOCAL PROGRAM- 
ING IN CENTRAL OHIO— 

Go into the rural areas of Central Ohio 
and ask them if they know Bill Zipf. You 
will run into thousands who day after day 
depend upon Bill for information on farming. 

Newspaper columnist, authority on agriculture, broadcaster, 
friend — that's Bill Zipf to the farmer and city dweller of this 
area. A novel twist to this farm packed program is Sally Flowers 
with her salty songs and snappy humor. 
Here's a sales harvest for advertisers. 



COVERS 



IN COLUMBUS ITS 



T 



POWER 5000 D*1000*N CBS 



ASK JOHN BLAIR 



18 JULY 1949 



83 



over-all 



of high-powered research searchlights. 

The growth of storecasting was ma- 
terially aided by a research study con- 
ducted in the Baltimore Markets for 
N. W. Ayer some years ago under the 
supervision of Matthew Chappell. The 
point-of-sale impact was so resultful 
that the figures were put under lock 
and key and have not been released by 
Ayer. Other studies are just now be- 
ing planned by groups in the field. 

Transitradio research has been con- 
ducted in St. Louis and Washington. 



D. C by Edward Doody, who is mak- 
ing a specialty of reporting on how 
the man and woman who ride in pub- 
lic service vehicles react to spoken ad- 
vertising in buses and streetcars. 

While broadcast advertising research 
is further advanced than any other 
media research and delivers far more 
definitive facts, it must go even fur- 
ther into the minds of all who listen 
and look before they buy. It's the best 
media research ever conceived. It must 
be and will be better in 1949-1950. 




DEEP 

ROOTED 



Once again, roots of corn and wheat are reaching deep 
into rich Kansas soil to produce what promises to be still 
another record-breaking crop. 

WIBW is deeply rooted in the farm homes of this area 
. . . has been for 25 years. It's the station most listened 
to by Kansas farmers. That's why so many advertisers de- 
pend upon WIBW to help them reap a rich harvest of SALES. 



W 



W 



frr 



\, 



SERVING AND SELLING 

"THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

WIBW • TOPEKA, KANSAS • WIBW-FM 




Standards of practice 

Code not too well 
honored first year 

The code that broadcasters put into 
practice last year to govern their stand- 
ards of practice still stands a structure 
of utmost long-range importance to 
radio and its advertisers. But various 
seams, rents, and structural strains 
have appeared under the stress of com- 
petition for business that steadily ap- 
pears less lush. 

Adherence by stations and networks 
to good taste provisions of the code has 
been rather uniform — that isn't the 
place that pinches broadcasters in the 
sensitive spot — advertising revenue. 
Recommendations on commercial time 
have been reasonably well followed 
with certain exceptions. Early morn- 
ing and late night periods generally 
continue to bulge with fat pre-code 
proportions of commercial time. Shop- 
ping programs and participating shows 
are other instances in which code time 
limitations are widely ignored. 

The NAB board, meeting in Ports- 



WHICH IS LARGER? 

(Black or White) 




Rep: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. • BEN LUDY, Gen. Mgr. • WIBW • KCKN • KCKN-FM 



IF YOU SAID W Via - 

YOU'RE RIGHT! 

AND YOU'RE ALWAYS 
RIGHT WHEN YOU 

ADVERTISE 

*"XLu*r 

BECAUSE XL STATIONS 

Get Kesults 



Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 

Eastern Western 



84 



SPONSOR 



mouth. N. H. as this went to press took 
a long look at code compliance after 
a year's operation and planned an 
"educational" campaign to strengthen 
adherence. 

During the year just past some gap- 
ing holes opened in the code structure. 
They are quietly insisted to be neces- 
sary "for business." Critics are bitter 
at relaxation of standards they've al- 
ready called too lax. 

NBC gave up the ban on mystery 
programs before nine p.m. and on 
give-aways. The hour at which any 
mystery is broadcast will depend on 
its individual nature. CBS has an- 
nounced already, following the FCC 
action on the Mayflower policy, that 
the net will sell time for controversial 
discussions. Other webs haven't made 
public announcements, but they will 
go along, each writing its own con- 
troversy policy regulations. 

Privately admitting, "We need the 
revenue," ABC became the second net- 
work to sell time for commercial reli- 
gious broadcasts. MBS was the first. 
All-out supporters of the code have 
argued that the health and ultimately 
the life of free radio depends on self- 
regulation in the direction attempted 
by the code. 

Critics like the Radio Listeners of 
Northern California would impose 
much sterner standards, and are back- 
ing up their viewpoint with strong 
representations to both individual sta- 
tions and sponsors. The group consists 
mainly of parents with a sprinkling of 
educators and professional people 
strongly backing them. Similar groups 
have arisen in other parts of the coun- 
try. If their enthusiasm holds out. they 
may yet, by pressure on sponsors, do 
infinitely more than a NAB educa- 
tional campaign toward influencing a 
healthy standard of broadcast practice. 
One of the points made off-the-record 
by National Broadcasting Company 
executives on why NBC no longer is 
fighting the battle of keeping mystery 
off air until after 9 p.m. is that wom- 
en's clubs and Parent-Teacher organi- 
zations didn't back up their "protect 
the children" stance. 

"It can make no sense for a busi- 
ness, and NBC is a business, to refuse 
millions of dollars of broadcast adver- 
tising to satisfy organizations that for- 
get that what you're doing is what 
they asked for," is the way one NBC 
executive phrases it. 

The customer is always right — when 
he does something about it. * * * 




7Ve T>o- 7JU& 

At KQV, it's a 24-hour-a-day job aggressively 
promoting in the right places for its advertisers. 
Carefully planned promotion — billboard, newspaper, 
and special theater tie-ins — is one reason why our 
ratings are consistently good. And spot revenue- 
wise, KQV is among the top five Mutual stations 
of the nation. 



PITTSBURGH'S AGGRESSIVE 
RADIO STATION 

Basic Mutual Network • Natl. Reps. WEED & CO. 



WHY buy just the Birmingham area? 
Buy all Alabama for less on WVOK 







WVOK[ 



IRALEE BENNS 

President 
WILLIAM J. BRENNAN 

Commercial Manager 



] Voice 
Birmim 



of Dixie 

gham, Ala. 



18 JULY 1949 



85 







FIRST IN THE 



QUAD 



DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND, MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



AM 



5,000 W 
1420 Kc. 



FM 



47 Kw. 
103.7 Mc. 



TV 



C.P. 22.9 Kw. visual 
and aural, Channel 



Basic Affiliate of NBC, 
the No. 1 Network 



WOC is the FIRST individual station . . 
the only Quad-Cities station . . to 
offer its clients commercial copy analysis. 
On request WOC's Research Department 
tests WOC advertisers' copy for sales 
effectiveness through listening ease and 
human interest . . according to a proved 
formula developed by renowned analyst 
Dr. Rudolph Flesch. All WOC-written 
copy is so evaluated. Another in WOC's 
long list of "FIRST'S" ! 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, Manager 

D A VEN PO RT , I O WA 




v: 



FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 








SUPERIORITY COMPLEX 



My husband, advertising manager of the Ding-Bat Company, used to be a 
nice fellow with just enough of an inferiority complex to make him easy to live 
with. Since he picked KXOK, sales have gone up so fast my husband thinks 
he's the smartest advertising manager in town. Now he has a superiority com- 
plex and he's positively obnoxious. 

Unhappy Wife 
Dear Unhappy Wife: 

Maybe KXOK should have the superiority complex instead of your husband. 
During March, 1949, KXOK was within share of audience striking distance of 
first place in St. Louis. Briefly, this means KXOK delivers more Hooper audi- 
ence per dollar than any other St. Louis network station. No wonder Ding-Bat 
products are going to town. When your husband checks KXOK's low-cost- 
per-Hooper point, KXOK's wide coverage, and KXOK's low-in-St. Louis 
rates, he'll be even cockier! 

KXOK, St. Louis 

630 on the dial 



Basic ABC 



5,000 Watts 



A "John Blair" station 



CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

(Continued from page 80) 

stars and sound-stage equipment. The 
deal for the first set was worked out 
between Kellogg and Columbia Pic- 
tures, with Photoplay magazine get- 
ting the credit for the selection of the 
stars. All are cooperating on the joint 
razzle-dazzle promotion. 

Other premiums during the year for 
air advertisers ran the usual gamut 
of housewares, kitchen wares, jewelry, 
flowers, and booklets. P&G offered 
plastic food bags, gladiolus bulbs, and 
rain scrafs. General Foods offered 
silverplated teaspoons, plastic tumblers, 
plastic food bags, cameos, and art sup- 
plies. General Mills offered pastry 
cloths, silvervs are. and candid cameras. 
Lever Brothers offered a "Neptune's 
Daughter" pin I a movie tie-in w ith 
M-G-M ) on Lux Radio Theater, lock- 
ets, Spry cookbooks, and aluminum 
saucepans. Other big premium users 
in the 1948-1949 period included Ral- 
ston, Brown & Williamson. Sterling 
Drug. Wander. Cudahy. and Whitehall 
Pharmacal. 

Locally and regionally, air contests 
and offers ran higher in proportion to 
the national picture. Crosse & Black- 
well, a national food advertiser, ran a 
special local promotion via a show 
called How Well Do You Know Me? 
on Baltimore's WFBR. Contestants 
were phoned, asked to list C&B prod- 
ucts available at their grocer, the 
"product of the week." and the "Mys- 
tery Host" I prominent Baltimoreans 
like Reginald Stewart and Ogden 
Nash I. Sales for C&B products in 
Baltimore shot up, and the product 
line moved into a total of 55 Balti- 
more stores where it had not been 
previously handled. That's a lot, when 
you think that C&B is a Baltimore 
firm, and the home town market ap- 
peared to be saturated. 

The success of Crosse & Blackwell 
on WFBR is typical of the kind of re- 
sults that well-planned local contests 
and offer bring. The Butte Brewing 
Company has for nearly two years 
been conducting the Butte Beer Quiz- 
master on KXLF. Butte. Montana, and 
has been boosting beer sales with a 
"true or false" quiz format. The week- 
ly prize is a free case of beer. In 
Honolulu, station KPOA. long a pro- 
motion-conscious broadcaster, has 
built sales and listener ratings for the 
nearly half-a-hundred participating 
sponsors who bankroll baseball games 



86 



SPONSOR 



on the station. Weekly contests, with 
prizes coming from the sponsors, have 
had Hawaii's baseball-loving listeners 
predicting ball scores for prizes and 
bringing a whopping 6,000 weekly 
mail pull to KPOA. There are hun- 
dreds of similar case histories where 
national formulas for air contests and 
offers have been given a successful 
local twist to the benefit of both the 
station and its advertisers. Good pro- 
grams deserve good promotions.* -x * 



TRANSITRADIO 

(Continued from page 72) 

cooperative funds of national advertis- 
ers. 

Co-op funds are available from 
many firms for transitradio. Included 
in this category are Crosley. RCA. Zen- 
ith. General Electric. Frigidaire. West- 
inghouse. Dodge. Chrysler. Kaiser- 
Frazer. Seven-Up. Dr. Pepper, and 
Royal Crown. 

National advertisers using transit- 
radio without dealer participation in- 
clude Bendix, Swift. Miles Laborator- 
ies, Sears Roebuck, B. C. Remedy. 
F. W. Fitch, Coronet, International 



WINSTON-SALEM 




How To Lose An Account 

A Winston-Salem dry 
cleaner, using WAIRadio ex- 
clusively, cancelled his news 
strip. Reason: He outgrew 
his plant and could not 
handle the increased busi- 
ness WAIRadio brought. We 
lost this account for six 
months. Now he's back on 
the air, the new plant in 
operation and business is 
booming. 







NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



Correspondence Schools, and Cruen 
Watch. 

With equipment failures virtually 
overcome, transitradio will in the 
1949-50 season prove itself and sel 
sights to become a really national ad- 
vertising vehicle. 

New York, Boston, and a host of 
other top population centers, are even 
now talking with transitradio operators 
about installations. In the case of 
New York where rapid transit opera- 
tions for the most part are municipally 
owned, it takes time to sign contracts. 



The big cities are looking to the I 1 
areas now served before the\ make 
up their individual and collective 
minds. There seems little doubt but 
that advcrtising-while-you-ride will be 
the normal transit service before an- 
other ten years has passed. 

There is one big problem. That is 
a matter of programing. While music, 
news, and commercials do the job. 
there may be something better. 

P.S. All transitradio is FM served. 
It can only operate because of FMs 
static-free design and service. + + * 




♦Special Market Analysis pre- 
pared by Sales Management, 
based on 0.5 MV/M Listening 
Area — 1948. 



STUDIOS IN LAWRENCE, 

BOSTON, LOWELL 

Boston Sales Office: 

216 Tremont St. 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO., 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



4,357,300 people live in 20 of 
New England's richest counties 
which WLAW serves . . . from 
Portland, Maine, to Newport, 
Rhode Island . . . folks who last 
year spent *$ 1,1 60,643,000.00 
for FOOD . . . $110 ; 602,000.00 
in DRUG STORES . . . $194,437,- 
000.00 for HOUSEHOLD FUR- 
NISHINGS AND RADIOS . . . 
$514,930,000.00 for GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE. 

We're telling you, it's really so 
. . . you'll get results on 6-8-0. 



50,000 WATTS • 680 KILOCYCLES 

WLAW 

NEW ENGLAND'S MOST POWERFUL RADIO STATION 

WLAW-FM 20,000 WATTS - 93.7 MEG. 
ABC BASIC STATION, LAWRENCE, MASS 



18 JULY 1949 



87 




Mr. Sponsor asks 



"Radio station rates seem to be established without any 
statistical or factual basis. Why isn't it possible to 
have broadcasting rates based upon a suitable cost- 
per-thousand" ? 



William H. Ritter 



President 

P. J. Ritter Co., Bridgeton, N. J. 




The 

Picked Panel 
answers 
Mr. Ritter 



The only sound 
basis on which 
one can compare 
radio circulation 
with that of 
newspapers or 
magazines is to 
compare radio 
receiving sets 
with copies of the 
publication. In 
other words, the newspaper or maga- 
zine furnishes the advertiser with rea- 
sonably exact information as to the 
number of copies either sent via sub- 
scriptions or sold through newsstands. 
The broadcaster furnishes the equiva- 
lent information when he supplies the 
number of receiving sets in homes 
served by a station. There is no guar- 
antee by periodicals that the subscriber 
or publisher of a magazine or news- 
papers reads either the magazines or 
the advertisements. There is no guar- 
antee by the broadcaster that the owner 
of the receiving set either listens to his 
station at any particular hour or hears 
the advertising message. 

Both publications and broadcasters 
attempt to supply additional informa- 
tion pertaining to readership on the 
one hand, or listening habits on the 
other. These attempt to establish ac- 
tual circulation for a particular ad- 
vertisement. One has to go even fur- 



ther, however, to establish the real in- 
formation required by the advertiser, 
namely, the sales effectiveness of the 
advertising, be it in publication or on 
radio. 

Most of the confusion in connection 
with radio circulation has arisen be- 
cause of the attempts to measure "actu- 
al circulation" to a particular message, 
rather than to evaluate available circu- 
lations. Also, there has been a ten- 
dency to lay greater stress on popu- 
larity of a radio program than on the 
sales effectiveness of the advertising 
message in the program. I believe this 
is one reason why spot advertising has 
had such a tremendous growth in re- 



It's quite obvious 
that in the final 
analysis, the con- 
tinued use of a 
station by its ad- 
vertisers is based 
on a satisfactory 
relationship be- 
tween expendi- 
ture and return. 
In the establish- 
ment of our own rate structure at 
WFAS, we don't feel that it has been 
set without a factual basis of expected 
circulation. 

I would surmise that any progres- 
sive station maintains a careful watch 




lation to program advertising. In the on its circulation. I borrow the term 



case of spot advertising, the advertiser 
is able to narrow his analysis of re- 
sults. 

It would be folly to establish radio 
advertising rates based on what I have 
termed above "real circulation." as 
against potiential circulation. Obvi- 



"circulation" rather than use coverage, 
because campaigns pay off on the num- 
ber of homes in which the message is 
heard, rather than on the potential 
homes that fall within the station's 
technical service area. 

Rates which have been set for 



ously. "real circulation" varies with the WFAS are the result of considerable 
time of day, the type of program, the study in which the circulation of the 
habits of the listeners, and many other station, as revealed by Conlan listen- 
factors. There are too many instances er study surveys, mail-counts, and 
where a good program on inferior other means, has an important part, 
facilities has a larger "real circula- Of course we must arrive at a reason- 
tion" than a poor program on superior ably happy union between cost-per- 
facilities. The examples are countless thousand to the advertiser and how 
and well-known to the trade. It is also much revenue is needed to operate the 
well-known that many so-called "low station and show a reasonable return, 
rating" programs have had high sales Since the operating revenue needed to- 
effectiveness, so that the real cost per day is considerably higher than it was 
thousands of listeners, after all. de- a few years ago, it is logical to expect 
pends in radio, as it does in publica- some deterioration is to be encountered 
tions. on the effectiveness of the ad- in the cost-per-thousand figure, 
vertising and on the securing of what In my opinion it is unre alistic to tie 
I term "real circulation" through a cogt of ' se l ec tive radio advertising to 
superior technique and approach to specific period ra tings. Take an ac- 
either the readers or the listeners. count uging five gpots daily run . of . 

Frank E. Mullen schedule: to bill them $10.00 for a spot 



88 



SPONSOR 



with double the rating of another 
spot charged at $5.00 is obviously im- 
practicable since the ratings of the 
spots may very well fluctuate exten- 
sively from week to week, even though 
the average day-by-day circulation of 
the station remains fairly constant. 
Furthermore, requiring consideration 
by station management, though unfor- 
tunately not a point of interest to the 
advertiser, the cost of operating the 
station is likely to remain as high for 
times of less favorable ratings as it 
does for top-flight periods. Even pub- 
lications with ABC figures usually 
make no distinction in run-of-paper 
schedules, although readership of an 
advertisement on page 3 may be twice 
that of page 7 or 8. 

In the final analysis, I feel strongly 
that a well-run radio station makes a 
very real effort to pitch its rates at a 
point which combines a worthwhile 
economy per thousand families reached, 
with a reasonable return to the station. 
Frank A. Seitz, 
Managing director 
WFAS—WFAS-FM 
White Plains, N. Y. 



Radio, radio 
station, and ra- 
dio station rates 
are like "Topsy" 
— they just grew. 
Advertising rates 
for radio should 
be established 
with a yardstick, 
using several fac- 
tors: 




1. Freqency 



2. Soil conductivity 

3. A half millivolt or greater meas- 
urement 

From the above three factors, the 
actual number of radio homes within 
any station's given area can be ac- 
curately determined. With continuing 
diary studies over the same area, the 
average tune-in of a given station can 
thus be determined. 

Rates from such conclusions can be 
established on an accurate cost-per- 
thousand radio family-tune-ins. A 
fairly high factor of tune-in must be 
used, as occasional listening is of no 
value to the advertiser or station. 
Ben Ludy 
General Manager 
WWW, Topeka, Kan. 

* * -K 

18 JULY 1949 



Watch the 
New WDSU 

No Other New Orleans Station 
Offers This Complete Coverage 
AM - TV - FM 



DIXIELAND JAZZ! 

Oscar "Papa" Celestin 

and his Tuxedo Jazz Band 

(Sponsored by 

The Paddock) 




"Sharkey's" Original 

Dixieland Jazz Band 

(Available for 

Sponsorship) 



EDGAR B. STERN, JR. 
President 



ROBERT D. SWEZEY 
Executive Vice-President 



LOUIS READ 
Commercial Manager 



^m^m^mmmsm 



89 






Experience shows that the 
s poken word is far more 
persuasive than the written. 
To hear is to do, it what you hear 
is well and truly spoken* 







"Inhale!" 




YOU DO WHAT YOU'RE TOLD ! 



In Radio the spoken word 
reaches its greatest power of 
persuasion. And because 
CBS has more of the most 
powerful facilities in radio, 
more people can hear better 
the firm and persuasive 
accents of its advertisers. 




SUNDAY MONDAY DB y TUESDAY | WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY dry FRIDAY SATURDAY 



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,««TVCobb«tol« 
In 1915 y ot inghisma- 
96 bases.Dur & tol e 

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the amazing t o d {or 

bases. CobbJ wet „ r 




Ty Cobb 
On The Bases 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



10NG TlMt 



itm***" 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 





STATION 


STATION STATION STATION STATION 


STATION 




WHEC 


B C D E 


F 


MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 


40.4 


22.6 8.2 6.5 15.1 


5.5 


AFTERNOON 

12:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 


32.9 


27.3 8.5 14.0 14.0 


2.8 

Station 


EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 

Sunday through Sat. 


36.8 30.3 7.2 9.8 14.5 
WINTER-SPRING HOOPER REPORT 


Broadcasts 

till Sunset 
Only 






December '48 — Aor/7 '49 ^_^_ 





BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 



*#"#/# 




| G A N N E TT 

wmmmmm 

RADIO 



ROUP 



o/ ^^e^j 



N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



18 JULY 1949 



95 



IS THERE 



A nnPTn 

ft U U Li I U 

wmw ^m ^m m ^w 




HE 











< 



We mean a "Specialist," not a general practitioner. Radio and 
Television are highly competitive media. And since they began 

to vie for the advertising dollar, there has been an urgent need lor 

"specialized" representation of each. 

On the proven theory that one man cannot efficiently serve two 
masters, Blair-TV, Inc. was born. 

We are specialists . . . TV sales specialists devoting 100 percent 
of our energy and talents to the sale of television time and programs. 

Blair-TV, Inc. has developed its own sales technique which will 
mean more dollars for TV Station owners. 

May we tell you about the Blair-TV f 'Ten-point Sales Plan?" 



Write Blair-TV, Inc., 22 East 40th Street, New York 16, N. Y. 



BLAIR 




INC 




NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF 
LEADING TELEVISION STATIONS 



m 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ST. LOUIS • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



ill! 




^M 




44 markets now 

2,000,000 homes before 1 January 



lllilll 



M 



m 



w 



TV for results 

It's very costly for broadcasters, but 
the advertiser isn't doing badly 



TV is an important advertising med- 
ium. A year ago it was to be important 
in the future. That future is now. 

This does not mean that TV has 
supplanted radio, or that it will super- 
cede the aural form of broadcast ad- 
vertising. Radio and video can and 
will live together. 

There is telecasting in 44 markets 
or will be by 1 August. The medium 
is growing so fast that a recently pub- 
lished TV index was three stations 
short on its operating list the day it 
was published. 

With 1 August issue of SPONSOR, 
the 13th TV Trends will be published. 

18 JULY 1949 



It will show that network-TV sponsored 
broadcasting was 257.8% of the aver- 
age month from June 1948 to May 
1949. Even in the fixed sample of 
10 cities and 15 stations, network ad- 
vertising on the air was 188.6% of 
the average month in the same cities. 
These figures are based on the N. C. 
Rorabaugh Report for TV which item- 
izes the commercial telecasts on every 
station and network on the air, every 
month. 

Local-retail business on the air for 
June was 262.2% of the average for 
the past twelve months and national 
selective-TV was 185.6%. 



America's advertising leaders have 
dropped their wait-and-see attitudes. 
All the leading automotive manufactur- 
ers are on, or will be on, television 
this Fall. Procter & Gamble, Ameri- 
can Tobacco, Lever Brothers, Kraft. 
General Foods, General Mills, Ameri- 
can Home Products. Pabst, Gillette, 
Miles Laboratories, Texas, Colgate, 
Bristol-Myers, Philip Morris, Chester- 
field. R. J. Reynolds, Philco, Borden, 
Toni, Peter Paul, General Electric. Ad- 
miral, National Biscuit, Electric Auto- 
Lite, and RCA-Victor are just a few of 
the blue-chip names that have TV in 
their budgets. Many of these haven't 
cut their radio advertising. Others 
have. 

Television sets are no longer re- 
stricted to the wealthy or top sal- 
aried homes. With plenty of receivers 
available this fall in the under-$250 



97 




ACUSE 



the Onl y 

COMPLETE 

Radio 
Institution 



in 



Central New York 




94.5 «*2: 



€utdt&U 'PaM- 




Chann 




ACUSE 



Headley-Reed, National Representatives 
NBC AFFILIATE IN CENTRAL NEW YORK 



class and Regulation W being sus- 
pended so that they may be sold on 
the $5.00 down and a dollar a week 
basis, television sets will flow into 
homes at an increasing rate of speed. 
Estimates of set distribution in New 
York alone point to 771,000 TV 
equipped homes by 1 January 1949. 

NBC-research, which is the only or- 
ganization reporting TV homes on a 
monthly basis, itemized 1.853.000 TV 
sets-in-use as of 1 June 1949. 

With an average of 150,000 sets 
produced each month during the first 
five months of 1949 (128,000 by 
Radio Manufacturers Association mem- 
bers and balance by non-members I the 
2,000,000 TV-home figure will be 
passed long before 1 January 1950. 

The problem of VHF (Very High 
Frequency) stations will not stop the 
progress of TV. Present day sets plus 
a low cost adapter will be able to re- 
ceive VHF programs. Recent demon- 
strations for the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission and many other 
television factors have proved that new 
engineering developments are over- 
coming the interference of stations 
with each other on the present wave- 
bands (one of the reasons for the 
freeze of station license grants). Many 
of the developments are nominal in 
cost and are being added by transmit- 



TV films 



ting stations and receiver manufactur- 
ers as rapidly as they come out of the 
laboratory. 

Color, which is also a potent device 
for holding back the public acceptance 
of monochrome TV, may be forced 
upon manufacturers by some con- 
gressmen, who feel that RCA and 
others are in a league to withhold full 
color TV from the public. There'll be 
no color on the air commercialy for 
five years and it will be longer than 
that before sets capable of receiving 
color have wide home distribution. 

Adapters, which will enable TV 
black and white sets to receive full 
color pictures, are said to be in the 
laboratory. As yet they are bigger than 
the TV sets which they convert. Adap- 
ters which enable today's TV sets to 
receive monochrome pictures from sta- 
tions transmitting on very high fre- 
quency are available for production 
whenever the FCC authorizes VHF 
transmission. 

Telecasting is selling products for 
U. S. advertisers. As advertisers learn 
better how to use their latest medium, 
TV should contribute mightily to coun- 
teracting the present "put your money 
in the bank" recession. 

Bank on TV in 1949-1950, but don't 
forget all other forms of broadcast 
advertising. * * * 



Picture organizations learning art 
of producing air (film for sponsors 



The day when first-run. feature- 
length Hollywood films entertain the 
TV viewer in his living room is still 
a long way off. But. TV film sources 
as SPONSOR goes to press are offering 
newer and better film program pack- 
ages than most ad men suspect. Some 
firms, like Jerry Fairbanks. Ambassa- 
dor Films, Media Productions, and 
Gallaghers are deep in the work stages 
of making TV low-cost feature films 
and shorts. Watching the activities of 
these independent producers closely 
are the major companies, both in New 
York and Hollywood. Already, plan- 
ing for TV films at the majors, now 
that TV budgets for live programs 
have been touching $25,000 for a 30- 
minute show, is a serious thing. The 
biggest gripe of the independents now 
producing TV films revolves around 
the attitude of buyers of TV films 



when it comes to the kind of money 
they are willing to spend. Says one 
mid-west producer: "If buyers don't 
offer encouragement to producers, then 
they are going to get only the high- 
priced productions from only the few." 
Commercials are. however, a differ- 
ent story. The TV film spot has virtu- 
ally assumed the same importance in 
visual advertising that the transcribed 
announcement has had for years in 
sound broadcasting. Costs run the 
gamut depending on the nature of the 
job to be done. It's possible to buy 
a 1-minute, silent-film spot for as little 
as $100. Sound-on-film spots, where 
such trick effects as stop-motion, ani- 
mation, fancy opticals and so forth are 
involved can range up to SI 0.000 for 
a 1-minute spot. Making movies is a 
specialized art. and judging costs is 
not easy. One Chicago commercial film 



98 



SPONSOR 



firm states: "Almost always, the client 
or agency will do far better to line 
up, work with, and rely on a good pro- 
ducer, rather than award orders on 
the basis of bids." 

Several famous advertising names in 
broadcasting are at work on their own 
custom-made films, or have recently 
aired custom-made series. General 
Mills is having the radio-famous Lone 
Ranger transformed into a TV film 
hero by Apex in Hollywood, in a deal 
that will run well over a million dol- 
lars for the series. American Tobacco 
completed, not long ago, a run with 
Your Show Time, a series of 30-min- 
ute films shot to TV's exacting techni- 
cal requirements. Procter & Gamble, 
who for years has quietly been experi- 
menting with TV film techniques, has 
plans for film versions of the familiar 
daytime-radio "soapers" in the works. 
Other familiar radio program names, 
from dramatic and musical programs 
to jingle series, such as Harry Good- 
man's well-known Weather Forecast 
spots, are planning to jump the gap 
between sound and visual broadcast- 
ing . . . via TV films. * * « 



TV packages 

Half of fall shows 
package produced 

The Fall crop of available TV live 
packages runs the gamut from acted- 
out charades to zoological lectures, 
with production ranging from one-set, 
one-character shows to elaborate re- 
vues with star casts and top acts. Costs 
also run the full range, with network- 
intended packages for sale at prices in 
the $1,000-$10,000 class, with the 
average running around $4,500. Costs 
are usually rock-bottom, since most 
advertisers are still price-conscious 
when it comes to TV show-stopping. 

Visual versions of several well- 
known radio shows are for sale this 
year, following the path of Arthur 
Godfrey, We The People, Stop The 
Music and others which have made the 
jump from radio to video successfully. 
The ABC Barn Dance, Blind Date, 
Duke Fagin, Ladies Be Seated, R.F.D. 
America, TV Telephone Game, and 
Viz Quiz of Two Cities, all for sale as 
TV live packages, had their start in 
radio. Famous producers in other 
fields, like Broadway's George Abbott 
and Jules Ziegler, and radio's Charlie 

18 JULY 1949 





STARTING JULY 1 



All new equipment, new studios, and a crack-a-jack staff of 
Telecast Technicians — That's WTCN-TV. 

Take another look at the line-up shown in the cut above. 
We're not foolin' I We're in Television on a professional 
basis from the start! Some fop-fl/fe spot TV for sale! For 
availabilities and details, write, wire, or phone. 

TV FACTS 

MINNEAPOLIS— ST. PAUL 

17,100 TV sets installed in our 

coverage area. 

o 

Scores of new TV sets being 

installed weekly. 

• 

Coverage . . . sixty mile radius 

of the Twin Cities. 

• 

1,611,200 people in our coverage 

area spending $1,850,986,000 

in retail sales. 

• 

82% of installed TV sets are 

in homes. 

• 

Facilities include 3 RCA studios 

and remote cameras, mobile unit 

and relay equipment, 16 mm 
/\ sound film projector, slide 
projectors, etc. 




WTCN 



FM TV 



BASIC 



ABC 



See cut above for TV affiliations 
FREE and PETERS Representatives 



99 




A practical 
marketing department 
in one volume" 



That's how one agency head describes 

CONSUMER MARKETS. 

And many oilier agency marketing and media 

executives, sales and advertising managers 

in all parts of the country have commented 

on CONSUMER MARKET'S completeness 

and easy-to-use format. 

In addition to its popular and extremely 

useful map^; its statistical coverage of all 

stales, all counties, all cities and towns of 

5,000 population and over; media Service- 



Ads* in CONSUMER MARKETS, like the 
one illustrated, offer market searchers use- 
ful supplementary information rn/lit on the 
spot. 

Are you one of the thousands who are find- 
ing CONSUMER MARKETS a valuable 
workbook whenever they need information 
on any local market in the U. S., the I". S. 
Possessions, Canada, or the Philippines? 
The new 1949-1950 Edition will be out on 
September 1, with the most recent market 
■ lata and estimates available from the most 
tillable sources. 



*SERVICE-ADS are advertisements that supplement the listed data in CON- 
SUMER MARKETS with useful information that sells by he/ping buyers buy. 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, Inc. 

Th<? rlahcnat Authority Serving I he Mtrdia-bv ymg Function 
333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE • CHICAGO 1, III. 



Service . . . Quality . . . Ingenuity! Geared to lick 
your advertising problems in the visual field of advertising. 
Skilled technicians, creative artists, clever writers . . . 
organized cooperatively for the sole purpose of producing better 
motion pictures. 

SPOT COMMERCIALS • FEATURE FILMS 
PROGRAMMING • ANIMATION 




U^sif r 



- INCORPORATED- 



rwENrr EAST FORTY SECOND STREET • NEW YORK CITY 17. NFW YORK 

Producers and Creaters of 16mm Motion Pictures for 

TELEVISION INDUSTRY EDUCATION 



Basch and John Gibbs are actively in 
the TV package game as well. Several 
well-known literary and dramatic prop- 
erties such as Bomba, The Jungle Boy 
of Advertiser's Television Service and 
Charlie Basch's Adventures of Dr. Fu 
Manehu have also made their TV ap- 
pearance. 

TV, with its own special entertain- 
ment qualities, its limitations, and its 
visual aspect has played the role of 
god-father to some purely-TV-created 
shows. MCA's Roller Derby, Jack Par- 
ker's Tele-Puppets Theatre, and cha- 
rade shows like Say It With Acting 
are typical. The success in TV of shows 
like Admiral Broadway Revue and 
dramatic vehicles like Ford Theater 
have opened the way for package 
shows like Sidetvalks of New York 
with Eddie Dowling. and World Vi- 
deo's Actor's Studio. 

The types of shows represented in 
sponsor's Fall Facts listings for 1949, 
and the audiences they attract are as 
varied as most advertisers could wish 
for. They are a long way from being 
as polished as the Broadway or Holly- 
wood product, but the quality is steadi- 
ly improving, as the men who call the 
shots in TV control rooms become 
seasoned hands at visual programing. 



Ad agency TV departments 

Judge agencies by 
their TV staffs? 



With nearly four-score TV stations 
on the air now. the field of ad agencv 
operations in TV has moved quickly 
to keep up. Television advertising for 
regional and large local accounts in 
cities like Chicago. Detroit. Los Ange- 
les. San Francisco. Baltimore, and 
Cleveland has grown in importance to 
the point where it can no longer be 
handled out of the agency's home of- 
fice TV department, usually in New 
York, alone. Just as the handling of 
radio advertising for regional ac- 
counts, such as foods, beverages, and 
retail chains, requires special knowl- 
edge of regional conditions and market 
situations, TV advertising at this mar- 
keting level is growing to the point 
where the same specialized treatment 
is called for. Such well-known agencies 
as Ruthrauff & Ryan. McCann-Erick- 
son, Campbell-Ewald, J. Walter Thomp- 
{Please turn to page 105) 



100 



SPONSOR 



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Birmingha 
Los Angel 

San Diego 
San Franc 

Calif. 
New Have 




LOS ANGELES: -"Let's have more of 
Bergen," said a card we got the other 
day. Our Southern California viewers 
had seen Edgar Bergen in his first TV 
appearance since retiring from radio . . . 
of course, on KTTV. Top drawer talent 
has always been part of our strong lo- 
cally-produced shows here. Hollywood is 
a vast reservoir of singers, dancers, actors 
— gifted entertainers — and we have been 
drawing on all these people to program 
bright, refreshing television. For instance, 
last week such well-known names as Alan 
Mowbray, Sonny Tufts, Billy Burke, Vin- 
cent Price, Marjorie Reynolds and others 
appeared on regularly-scheduled KTTV 
shows. Then the New York Chevrolet 
dealers bought our "Pantomime Quiz," 
the first Hollywood production to break 
into the Manhattan market. From CBS- 
TV we have Toast of the Town, Fred 
Waring, Arthur Godfrey and more. The 
point is we're offering our viewers not 
only high-rated network shows . . . our 
local shows are loaded with talent, pro- 
duction know-how, and audience pulling 
power. 

LIKE KIDS, we boast of our "parents" 
I (because they can be boasted about.) 
KTTV is 51% owned by the Los Angeles 
Times and 499c by CBS. No question 
in anybody's mind that the Times is 
Southern California's leading newspaper. 
And CBS programs certainly have been 
stealing the ratings. That gives us the 
best in network shows . . . plus the strong 
right arm of this area's greatest news- 
paper. So we're part of a sound, expand- 
ing local picture that also finds us as 
CBS's Hollywood TV station. 

BANKERS are supposed to have steely 
eyes, at least when asked to part with 
money. When the 35-branch Citizen's 
Bank started the Vienna Philharmonic 
series over KTTV recently, we thought 
that television certainly had arrived. Now 
along comes the world's largest bank. 
Bank of America, and starts "Kieran's 
Kaleidoscope" with us on Sundays. You're 
not only in good company on KTTV, but 
in company that knows how to look at a 
buck. 

RADIO SALES knows our latest avail- 
abilities. Ask them and get the usual 
speedy reply. 



KTTV 



TIMES "CBS TELEVISION 



LOS ANGELES 



Advertising Agencies with TV Dep'ts 



AGENCY 


CITY 


TV DEPT HEAD SUPERVISOR 


TV 
STAFF 


FILM 
DEPT 


CLIENTS 
IN TV 


AGENCY ASSOCIATES 


L. A. 


J. B. von Brecbt 


No 


Yes 


1 


AGENCY SERVICE CORP 


Chi. 


Alfred C. Houser. Exec Vp 


No 


No 


1 


ANDERSON. DAVIS & PLATTE 


N. Y. 


Victor Seydel 


Yes 


No 


None 


ARNOLD & CO. 


Bost. 


Arnold Z. Rosoff 


No 


No 


6 


ATHERTON & CURRIER 


N. Y. 


John P. Atherton 


No 


No 


1 


AUBREY. MOORE & WALLACE 


Chi. 


J. H. North 


Yes 


Yes 


None 


N. W AYER 


N. Y. 
H'wood 


H. L. McClinton, Vp 
Chet Brouwer 


Yes 

Yes 


Yes 

No 


6 
None 


BACON, HARTMAN & VOLLBRECHT 


St. Aug. 


John L. Yollbrecht 


No 


Yes 


2 


BADGER & BROWNING & HERSEY 


N. Y. 


Doty Edouarde 


Yes 


No 


1 


FREDERICK E BAKER 


Seattle 


Peter Lyman 


No 


No 


None 


BALDWIN. BOWERS & STRACHAN 


Buffalo 


Everett L. Thompson 


Yes 


No 


5 


BALL & DAVIDSON 


Denver 


Mark Schreiber, Vp 


No 


Yes 


None 


B B D & 


\ Y. 


Herbert B. West 


Yes 


Yes 


19 


BENTON & BOWLES 


N. Y. 


Walter Craig, Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


6 


BERMINGHAM, CASTLEMAN & PIERCE 


N. Y. 


George C. Castleman 


Yes 


No 


None 


BING & HAAS 


Cleve. 


Ernest W. Joseph 


Yes 


No 


2 


BI0W COMPANY 


N. Y. 
San Fran. 


William Morris 
Norman E. Mork 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 

No 


2 

1 


BLAINE THOMPSON 


N. Y. 


Mario Lewis. Vp 


Yes 


No 


3 


BROOKE, SMITH, FRENCH 


Detroit 


Hu?h Hole 


Yes 


No 


3 


E L BROWN 


Phila. 


Roland Israel 


No 


No 


4 


FRANKLIN BRUCK 


N. Y. 


Mort Heineman 


No 


No 


1 


BUCHANAN & CO. 


N. Y. 


John R. Sheehan 


No 


No 


1 


H W BUDDEMEIER 


Balto. 


Marcus E. Smith 


No 


No 


4 


LEO BURNETT 


Chi. 


Clair C. Callihan 


No 


No 


6 


BYER & BOWMAN 


Columbus 


Bill Copeland 


Yes 


No 


2 


HAROLD CABOT 


Bost. 


Jan Gilbert 


Yes 


No 


4 


CALKINS & HOLDEN 


N. Y. 


Chester H. Miller 


No 


No 


1 


CAMPBELL-EWALD 


N. Y. 


Winslow H. Case, Sr. Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


5 


SOLIS S. CANTOR 


Phila. 


Robert A. Weiner 


No 


No 


4 


CARTER ADVERTISING 


Balto. 


Herb True 


Yes 


No 


None 


CAYTON, INC 


N.Y. 


Allan Black 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


CECIL & PRESBREY 


N. Y. 


David McAneny 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


JAMES THOMAS CHIRURG 


Bost. 


Edmund J. Shea 


Yes 


Yes 


None 


CLEMENTS CO 


Phila. 


Alice V. Clements 


Yes 


No 


5 


HARRY B COHEN 


N.Y. 


E Iward Aleshire 


No 


Yes 


None 


COMPTON ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 


Lewis H. Titterton 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


COOPER & CROWE 


Salt Lake 


Jon Duffy 


No 


No 


2 


CRAMER-KRASSELT 


Milw. 


J. S. Stolzoff 


Yes 


No 


10 


D'ARCY ADVERTISING 


Cleve. 


Stan Seward, Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


7 


DANCER-FITZGERALD-SAMPLE 


N.Y. 


Adrian Samish. Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


DEUTSCH & SHEA 


N.Y. 


Stephen Lewis 


Yes 


No 


2 


ZAN DIAMOND 


N.Y. 


Stanley Diamond 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


DOHERTY. CLIFFORD & SHENFIELD 


N.Y. 


Chester MacCracken 


Yes 


No 


2 


DORLAND, INC 


N.Y. 


Howard G. Barnes 


Yes 


Yes 


2 


JOHN C DOWD 


Bost. 


Theodore B. Pitman, Jr. 


Yes 


Yes 


8 


DOYL DANE BERNBACH 


N.Y. 


Maxwell Dane 


Yes 


Yes 


None 


ROY S DURSTINE 


N.Y. 


Maurice Condon 


No 


No 


None 


EMERY ADVERTISING 


Balto. 


R. I. Highleyman 


No 


No 


3 


ROBERT J ENDERS 


Phila. 


Robert J. Ehders 


Yes 


Yes 


7 


ERWIN WASEY 


L. A. 
N. Y. 


C. H. Cottington, Vp 
R. L. Eastland. Dir 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


None 

1 


FEDERAL ADVERTISING 


N.Y. 


Francis C. Barton. Jr. Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


2 


FITZGERALD ADVERTISING 


N. Orl. 


Aubrey Williams 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


FLACK ADVERTISING 


Syracuse 


Arnold E. Bowden 


Yes 


Yes 


2 


RICHARDIA. FOLEY 


Ph. hi 


James L. Tabor 


No 


No 


2 



102 



SPONSOR 



m 



AGENCY 


CITY 


TV DEPT HEAD SUPERVISOR 


TV 
STAFF 


FILM 
DEPT 


CLIENTS 
IN VT 


FOOTE, CONE & BELDING 


N. Y. 
Chi. 
San Fran. 


Roier Prvor 
Richard L. Davis 
Charlie Trieschmann 


Yes 
Yes 

No 


Yes 
No 
Yes 


6 
3 

None 


ALBERT FRANK GUENTHER LAW 


N. Y. 


John V. McAdams 


No 


No 


None 


FRENCH & PRESTON 


N. Y. 


Jerome B. Harrison 


Yes 


No 


2 


OAKLEIGH R FRENCH 


St. Louis 


A. Maescher, Jr. 


Yes 


No 


4 


AD FRIED 


Oakland 


Don Santo 


Yes 


No 


2 


FULLER, SMITH & ROSS 


N. Y. 


Lee Williams; Dick 
Reynolds (Cleve) 


Yes 


Yes 


12 


GARDNER ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 
St. Louis 


Roland Martini, Vp 
Arthur J. Casey, Dir. 


No 

No 


No 
Yes 


None 
2 


GARFIELD & GUILD 


San Fran. 


William A. Morrison 


No 


No 


2 


GIM HAM ADVERTISING 


Salt Lake 


Victor V. Bell 


Yes 


Yes 
No 


2 


GOTHAM ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 


Arthur A. Kren, Exec. Vp 


Yes 


None 


GRAY & ROGERS 


Phila. 


Edmund H. Rogers, Partn. 


Yes 


Yes 


5 


GRANT ADVERTISING 


Chi. 


Harry Holcombe 


Yes 


No 


2 


GREY ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 


Joe Bailey, Mgr. 


Yes 


No 


3 


GUENTHERBRADFORD 


Chi. 


Charles J. Zeller 


No 


Yes 


8 


LAWRENCE C GUMBINNER 


N. Y. 


Paul Gumbinner 


Yes 


No 


3 


M H HACKETT 


N. Y. 


Montague H. Hackett 


Yes 


No 


None 


HENRI. HURST & MCDONALD 


Chi. 


W. E. Jones 


Yes 


No 


4 


HICKS & GREIST 


N. Y. 


Peter A. Krug 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


HONIG COOPER 


San Fran. 


Louis Honia, Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


E. ROSS HUMPHREY 


Chi. 


E. Ross Humphrey 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING 


Chi. 


Milton G. Peterson 


No 


No 


1 


DUANE JONES 


N. Y. 


Walter Ware 


Yes 


No 


2 


KAL, EHRLICH & MERRICK 


Wash. D.C. 


Alvin Q. Ehrlich, Vp 


Yes 


No 


17 


KAMMANN-MAHAN 


Cinci. 


Ernestine Sicker 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


BEN KAPLAN 


Providence 


Robert M. Kaplan 


No 


Yes 


3 


KASTOR. FARRELL, CHESLEY & 
CLIFFORD 


N. Y. 


Theodore R. Palmer 


Yes 


Yes 


2 


JOSEPH KATZ 


Balto. 


Robert G. Swan 


Yes 


No 


1 


HENRY J KAUFMAN 


Wash. D.C. 


Jeffrey A. Abel 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


KENYON & ECKHARDT 


N. Y. 


Len Erickson, Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


KIESEWETTER, WETTERAU & BAKER 


N. Y. 


Edward G. Chase 


No 


No 


2 


ABBOTT KIMBALL 


N. Y. 


Miriam Trae~er 


No 


No 


2 


KIRCHER, HELTON & COLLETT 


Dayton 


Chuck Gay 


Yes 


No 


4 


PHILIP KLEIN 


Phila. 


Ed-ward Felbin 


No 


No 


3 


KUONER AGENCY 


N. Y. 


Myron P. Kirk. Vp 


Yes 


Yes 


4 


R L KULZICK 


Madison 


C. Beffa 


No 


Yes 


None 


LAKE SPIRO SHURMAN 


Memphis 


Hugh Murphy- 


No 


Yes 


None 


LAMBERT & FEASLEY 


N. Y. 


Ray Kremer 


No 


No 


1 


C J LaROCHE 


N. Y. 


William R. Stuhler 


No 


No 


1 


LAYNE LEENE & GREENE 


N. Y. 


H. Donald Lavine 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


AL PAUL LEFTON 


N. Y. 


Edwin S. Friendly, Jr. 


Yes 


No 


2 


IENNEN & MITCHELL 


N. Y. 


Nicholas Keesely 


Yes 


Yes 


2 


LILLER, NEAL & BATTLE 


Atlanta 




No 


No 


3 


LOISE MARK 


Milw. 


Loise Mark 


Yes 


Yes 


4 


EARLE LUDGIN 


Chi. 


Jane Daly 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


MARK. MAUTNER & BERMAN 


Milw. 


N. W. Mautner 


Yes 


No 


2 


MARSCHALK & PRATT 


N. Y. 


Edward J. Whitehead 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


J M MATHES 


N. Y. 


William H. Vilas 


Yes 


Yes 


4 


MAXON 


N. Y. 


Ed Wilhelm 


Yes 


No 


1 


McCANN-ERICKSON 


N. Y. 
Cleve. 


L. 0. Coulter 
Robert W. Dailey 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 

No 


S 
3 


McKEE & ALBRIGHT 


Phila 


James A. McFadden 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


DAN B. MINER 


L. A. 


Hilly Sanders 


Yes 


No 


3 


MITCHELL-FAUST 


Chi. 


Holman Faust 


Yes 


Yes 


None 


EMIL MOGUL 


N. Y. 


Emil Mogul, Pres. 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


RAYMOND R MORGAN 


H'wood 


James C. Morgan, Vp 


No 


No 


1 


MORSE INTERNATIONAL 


\ \ 


C. (' Slavl.au di. Mr 


No 


v 


\*one 




BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



18 JULY 1949 



103 




SPONSOR 

40 West 52 Street 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Send "99 TV RESULTS" to me as a gift 
for subscribing to SPONSOR now . . . 
only $8 a year for 26 Every-Other-Mon- 
day issues. 

H Remittance enclosed D Bill me later 



company 
address . 
city 



zone. . . . state. 



AGENCY 


CITY 


TV DEPT HEAD SUPERVISOR 


TV 
STAFF 


FILM 
DEPT 


CLIENTS 
IN TV 


H. C. MORRIS 


\. Y. 


A. Jay Sc-»al 


Yes 


No 


None 


MOSS ASSOCIATES 


N. Y. 


Ely A. Landau 


No 


Yes 


4 


NEEDHAM, LOUIS & BRORBY 


Chi. 


Alan Wallace, Vp 


Yes 


No 


2 


NEFF-R0G0W 


N. Y. 


William Rogow 


Yes 


No 


None 


NEWELL EMMETT 


N. Y. 


George Foley, Jr. 


Yes 


No 


5 


OHIO ADVERTISING 


Cleve. 


Melvin Tenenbaum 


Yes 


No 


7 


01IAN ADVERTISING 


Chi. 


I. J. Wagner, Vp 


Yes 


No 


3 


OLMSTED & FOLEY 


Minn. 


James D. McTighe 


No 


No 


2 


ROBERT W ORR 


N. Y. 


Stephen G. Bowen, Med. Dir. 


No 


No 


None 


OWEN & CHAPPELL 


N. Y. 


David Hale Halpern, Vp 


No 


No 


1 


PACIFIC NATIONAL 


Seattle 


Trevor Evans 


Yes 


No 


4 


PECK ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 


Arthur J. Daly 


Yes 


\-es 


2 


LARRY PENDLETON 


L.A. 


L. W. Pendleton 


Yes 


No 


None 


PLATTFORBES 


N. Y. 


Sherman E. Rogers 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


POSNER-ZABIN 


N. Y. 


James B. Zabin 


No 


Yes 


None 


PRATT & BURK 


Pittsb. 




No 


No 


3 


RADIO ADV. CORP OF AMERICA 


Jersey City 


Michael A. Fiore 


No 


Yes 


1 


CHARLES DALLAS REACH 


X. Y. 


Jerome B. Harrison 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


REDFIELD-JOHNSTONE 


N. Y. 


LeGrand L. Redfield 


No 


Yes 


2 


KNOX REEVES 


Minn. 


Russell Neff 


No 


No 


4 


FLETCHER D RICHARDS 


N. Y. 


Kenneth Young 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


ROCHE. WILLIAMS & CLEARY 


Chi. 


Phil Stewart 


Yes 


Yes 


1 


IRVING ROSEN 


N. Y. 


Irving Rosen 


No 


No 


None 


RUTHRAUFF & RYAN 


N. Y. 

Chi. 
H'wood 
Houston 
Balto. 
St. Louis 


Wilson Turtle, Vp 

Fred Frecland 
Marvin Young 
H. Donald Hopton 
Tom H. Reese 
Oscar H. Zahner 


Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
No 

No 
No 


4 
3 

1 

1 
2 


ST GEORGE & KEYES 


N. Y. 


James J. Freeman 


No 


Yes 


3 


WALKER SAUSSY 


New Orl. 


Walker Saussy 


Yes 


No 


1 


SCHECK ADVERTISING 


Newark 


E. Grant Scheck, Vp 


No 


No 


2 


SCHOLTS ADVERTISING 


L. A. 


T. D. Scholts 


No 


No 


None 


GORDON SCHONFARBER 


Providence 


Claire R. Grenier 


No 


Yes 


1 


RUSSEL M. SEEDS 


Chi. 


Jack Simpson 


No 


No 


None 


SHERMAN & MARQUETTE 


Chi. 


L. D. Griffith 


Yes 


No 


2 


SIMONS- MICHELSON 


Detr. 


Marian Sanders 


Yes 


No 


2 


SMITH, BULL & McCREERY 


L. A. 


Dick Garton 


Yes 


No 


2 


SMITH. TAYLOR & JENKINS 


Pittsb. 


Thomas J. MacWilliams 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


STERLING ADVERTISING 


N. Y. 


Myron Broun 


No 


Yes 


None 


STEWART-JORDAN 


Phila. 


Garry Bub, Vp 


Yes 


No 


2 


CHARLES R. STUART 


San Fran. 


H. L. Buccello 


No 


No 


1 


SULLIVAN, STAUFFER COLWELL & 
BAYLES 


N. Y. 


Phil Cohen, Vp 


Yes 


No 


2 


TAGGART & YOUNG 


L. A. 




No 


No 


1 


J WALTER THOMPSON 


N. Y. 

Chi. 
H'wood 
San Fran. 
L. A. 


John U. Reber 
Harold R. Rorke 
Earl Ebi 

Henry M. Jackson 
Leon Benson 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Y r es 
Yes 


2 

3 

1 

1 


TURNER ADVERTISING 


Chi. 


A. F. Marthens 


No 


Yes 


3 


VAN SANT, DUGDALE 


Balto. 


Dan J. Loden 


Yes 


No 


2 


HUGO WAGENSEIL 


Dayton 


Jim Bridges 


Yes 


No 


2 


WALKER & DOWNING 


Pittsb. 


R. C. Woodruff 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


WILLIAM WARREN 


N. Y. 


Stevens P. Jackson 


Yes 


Yes 


7 


WARWICK & LEGLER 


N. Y. 


Trevis Huhn 


No 


Yes 


4 


MILTON WEINBERG 


L. A. 


William Krauch 


No 


No 


1 


WILLIAM H. WEINTRAUB 


N. Y. 


Noran E. Kersta, Vp 


Yes 


No 


None 


WEISS & GELLER 


Chi. 
N. Y. 


Marvin Mann 
Lester J. Mallets 


Yes 
Yes 


No 
No 


3 

1 


WEST-MARQUIS 


L. A. 


George M. Wolfe, Jr. 


Yes 


Yes 


3 


WOLFE-JICKLING DOW & CONKEY 


Detr. 


James A. Christensen 


Yes 


No 


2 


YOUNG & RUBICAM 


N. Y. 


Everard Meade 


Yes 


Yes 


7 



104 



SPONSOR 

















TV Available Films I Facilities 




FIRM &CITY 


TV FILMS AVAILABLE 


TV FILM SERVICES 


mm 


COSTS 




K ICE TV PICTURE SVCE (NY) 


5F(Sil);50Sh 


2-millftSS 


35 & 16 


OR 




([ITURE FILMS (N Y) 


8 F; 4 Sh; others 




16 


$150 up rental 




dATEOPRGMSVCE(N.Y) 


53 0ES 


- 


16 


OR 




t ILMS(N Y.) 


44 Sh; French Newsreel 


- 


35 & 16 


OR 




IuHLENPRODTNS(L.A) 


Yar wild life Sh 




16 


OR 




HINDER FILM (Col Spr 


7000 OES (breaks) 


Film processing; spots 


35 & 16 


Rental $7 up 




11 lOPE PICTURES (H'wood) 


- 


Anim, spots etc 


35 & 16 


OR 




AlSSADOR FILMS (N Y.) 


52 TV Sh (Musical) 


Prciduction to order 


35 & 16 


OR 




M FILM CO (Ph la.i 


10Car;7OF;52W;52Sh 


Commls to order 


35 


OR 




It FILM PRODUCERS (NY.) 


3 Sh; Documentaries 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 




ULCOIL A) 


- 


Anim, commls, prgms 


35 & 16 


Spots $175-$1100 




11 PfiODTNSiN Y) 


— 


Anim; production* 


35 & 16 


OR 




W 1 RADIO &TVIN.Y) 


— 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 




MAYM FILMS (NY) 


28 Car; 128 Sh; 8 W; 

13 Music Sh 


Film clips; commls 


16 


$15-340 (reel) 
rental 


1 


l>ICTURES(N Y) 


12 F; others 


- 


35 & 16 


OR 


I 


It 1. INC (Wash D C) 


— 


Production to order 


16 only 


OR 


'. 


1 N PROD (H'wood) 


1 15-min F series 


Commls, spots etc 


35 & 16 


Spots av. $150- 
$250 




C ILM EFFECTS (NY) 


- 


Anim, spots etc 


35 & 16 


OR 




» GO FILM LAB (Chi) 


- 


All phases production 


35 & 16 


OR 




r FILM ENTRPRIN Y) 


14 Sh (on China) 


Production to order 


16 


SIJIIII vSIIIIILrrrll 

prod; $25 up 
rental 


G 


IRAFTPRODTNS(Cleve) 


- 


Production to order 


1 6 only 


OR 


1 


1 ART(N Y) 


- 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 




l ELE- H'wood i 


Yar TV film pckgs 


- 


16 


OR 




HEYA PRODTNSl H'wood) 


5 12-min series; SS 


Production to order 


16 


$150-$1000 


1 


IIS CULHANE (H'wood) 


1 Car 


Anim, straight commls 


16 


$750 up min 


G 


UNM DAY(N Y) 


- 


Commls; musical spots 


16 


$600-$2500 


: 


V PICTURES (NY) 


55 Sh 


1.5-milI ft SS; studio 


16 


OR 


3| 


IT TV NETWORK (NY) 


Var film-recorded pckgs 


"Tele-Transcriptions" 


35 & 16 


Base $8 min 




LO BRIT FILMS (N. Y.) 


300 Sh (Educ) 


Short subj to order 


35 & 16 


$25 up rental 




SIOR PICTURES (N Y) 


Var F, Sh, News 


- 


35 & 16 


OR 


I 


FAIRBANKS (NY.) 


(See NBC Listing) 


Creative; production 


35 & 16 


OR 




ASSOCIATES (Dayton) 


Var OES 


Commls, anim, lab work 


16 


Spots $82.50 up 




IQUITIES (N . Y.) 


150 Car; 500 F; 400 Sh etc 


Consultant on commls 


35 & 16 


OR 




TAR PRODTNSl H'wood) 


6 Car series 


Anim; commls; prgms 


16 


Comml $150 up 




NGO FILMS (N Y) 


25 Car; 10 F; 150 Sh etc 


- 


16 


OR 




FILMS iN Y) 


13 5-min Sh; 6 10-min Sh 


Anim; commls; prgms 


16 


OR 





IATION FILMS (LA) 


15 Sh (Religious) 


- 


16 


OR 


il 


GHER FILMS I Green Bay) 


3 Sh; others ■■. 


Commls; prgms: spots 


16 


OR 


n 


.EPRODTNS(N Y) 


- 


Commls, shorts to order 


16 


$500-$1400 


« 


S GOODMAN (NY.) 


3 OES series 


Commls, spots to order 


16 


Based on mkt 




O'REILLY STUD (NY) 


- 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


4 


PRODTNSl H'wood) 


2 F; 2 Sh (Religious) 


Commls to order 


16 


OR 


A 


EY PRODTNSl NY) 


4 Sh; others 


Production to order 


16 


OR 


A 


PARNELL (H'wood) 


13 Sh 


Production; Commls 


16 


80' , 10-min rate 


M 


'. INC (CulvsrCty) 


1 Car series; 13 F; others 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


Rental; OR 


N! 


PTVDEPT(N Y) 


INS-Telenews service 


"Projectall" balop. 


35 & 16 


OR 


IS 


JCTIONAL FILMS 


3 TV Sh series 




16 


OR 


HI 


ILM FNDTN(N. Y) 


2 Car; 37 Sh (Travel) 


Some production 


35 & 16 


OR 


11 


1 P SVCE(N Y) 


2 F (Palestine) 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


Cost-plus 


41 


ELEFILMfN Y) 


52 TV Sh 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR l 


A 


SON FILMS (Dallas) 




Production to order 


35 l 10 


Spots $100 up 


TZPRODTNSiN Y) 


2 Car: 1 F; 8 Sh 


Production to order 


35 A 16 


1500-115,000 



'I -On Request 

J lend: Car=Cartoon, F=Feature, OES=Open-end Spots, OR= On Request, Sh=Shorts, 

•-Sports, SS=Stoclt Shots, Western=Western. 



AD AGENCY TV DEPT'S 

(Continued from page 100) 

son, and Foote, Cone & Belding have 
semi-autonomous TV departments in 
the agency branches that are busy 
handling their own TV campaigns. 

Only about 15% of the total num- 
ber of agencies in the United States 
and Canada actually have TV depart- 
ments. Of these TV-minded agencies, 
roughly a quarter of them have one 
or two-man departments with no 
clients actually on the visual air. How- 
ever, the nearly-two hundred agencies 
that are actively in TV operations now 
control the majority of the advertis- 
ing billings in all media, and their 
client lists read like the Who's Who of 
advertising. There isn't an agency with 
any sort of sizeable broadcast adver- 
tising billings that hasn't felt the in- 
fluence of TV. 

There are still only a handful of 
agencies, like Kudner, Young & Rubi- 
cam, BBD&O, and K&E, etc., that can 
carry the enormous overhead of a com- 
pletely-staffed TV department, with all 
the creative, technical and film-trained 
people necessary. Other agencies are 
keeping up though, largely by doub- 
ling-in-brass with their radio depart- 
ments, and by calling in outside help 
from a growing list of TV-wise con- 
sultants, package producers, and film 
companies, who function, on a sort of 
"piece-work" basis, as additional 
agency TV personnel. The advertiser 
who feels that visual air advertising is 
necessary for a successful campaign 
for his product or services doesn't have 
to look far today to find an agency 
that can handle it. * * * 



TV ad placement 

Network telecasting 
up 1000% in year 

In a little more than a year's time, 
the total number of "units of business" 
placed by advertisers at all levels of 
TV air advertising has skyrocketed. 
Network TV has shown the largest 
growth: 1000%. Selective TV shows 
a sizeable 500 % , and TV at the local- 
retail level just under 800%. These 
figures, while they do not represent 
industrial expansion as such, are the 
results of a running comparative study, 
TV Trends, that has appeared monthh 
in SPONSOR. Using the figures of July. 
1948 as a base (10 cities. 19 stations 



18 JULY 1949 



105 



FIRM & CITY 


TV FILMS AVAILABLE 


TV FILM SERVICES 


mm 


COSTS 


KNICKERBOCKER PRODTNSiN Y) 




Production to order 


16 


OR 


KNOWLEDGE BUILDERS (N Y) 


2 Car;68 5h 


\niiii; spcl effects 


16 


S750 $'.1(10(1 


HERBS LAUFMANi Chi) 




Commls; sped effects 


16 


OR 


FRANK LEWIS (Chi) 




I 'onmils to order 


16 


Spots $500-$1000 


BOB LOEWI PRODTNSIN Y ) 


15 TV Sh (Sports) 


Commls; production 


16 


OR 


LOWE FEATURES H \vood 


13 15-min TV Sh 


- 


35 & 16 


OR 


MOGULL'S(N Y) 


4 F; 30 Sh (Religious) 




35 & 16 


OR 


MP ASSOC (Ml Ephraim) 


1 OES; SS 


News, sports covera; e 


16 


10 min $300 


NATL SCREEN SVCElN Y) 




Trailers, commls etc 


35 & 16 


OR 


NBC TV N Y 


SERIES; 1 Car; 3 F; 2 Sh; 
Newsreel; 1 W 


3.5 mill ft SS 


35 & 16 


OR 


NU-ART FILMS (N Y) 


2 Car; 68 F; 130 Sh; 35 W 




35 & 16 


$25-$400 rental 


OLIO VIDEO TV PRODTNSIN Y) 


18 F; 30 W 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


Based on mkt 


PARAMOUNT TV PRODTNSIN Y) 


Var TV film-recorded pcki s 


"Video Transcriptions"; anim etc 


35 & 16 


OR 


PARLETPRODTNS'Balto 




Production to order 


35 & 16 


Spots $175-11200 


PHOTO & SOUND (San Fran) 


1 Sh (Travel) 


Anim, commls, effects 


16 


Spots $100-$3000 


POLARIS PICTURES (LA) 




Prgms, commls, slides 


35 & 16 


OR 


PAUL PARRY PRODTNS(H'wood) 


3 F; 3 OES; 3 Sh 


Production to order 


16 


Spots $475-$2000 


GERARD PICK PRODTNSIN Y.) 


- 


Anim; commls to order 


35 & 16 


Spots $160 up 


PICTORIAL FILMS IN Y) 


11 Car; 2 F; 152 Sh; 43 W; 




16 


OR 


POST PICTURES (N Y) 


9F;37Sh; 1 W 


- 


16 


$25 reel up 


RALPH POWERS ( Balto) 


- 


Commls, prgms to order 


16 


Spots $150 up 


RARIGM P CO ( Seattle) 


- 


Anim, straight commls 


35 & 16 


OR 


REIDH RAY I St Paul) 


- 


Commls, anim to order 


35 & 16 


Spots $350-$2200 


RELIGIOUS FILM (N Y) 


4 Sh (Religious) 


- 


16 


$15 reel up 


RKOPATHE(N Y) 


- 


Commls, prgms to order 


16 & 35 


OR 


SALES WINNERS (N Y) 


- 


Animat; commls to order 


35 


OR 


SACK TV ENTRPRl Dallas) 


20F;220Sh; 10 W 


- 


35 & 16 


$25 up reel 


SCANDIA FILMS (N Y) 


10 Sh; Newsreels 




35 & 16 


$50 up 


SCREEN GEMS N Y.) 


150 Car; 25 OES; 104 Sh 


Commls, prgms to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


SENTINEL PRODTNS I H'#ood) 


4 F; Sh series 


Commls to order 


16 


Spots $1500- 
$4000 


SIMMELMESERVEY'H'wood) 


40 Sh 


Production to order 


16 


OR 


SKIBO PRODTNSIN Y) 


7 F; 100 Sh; 1 W 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


SIGMUND SPAETH IN Y) 


2 Sh (Musical) 


Music prgms to order 


16 


OR 


SOUTHERN TV I Lou wills) 


Var OES, Sh, SS, News 


Production to order 


16 


Cost 10% 


SQUARE DEAL PICTURES (N Y) 


1 F; 4 Sh 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


SUN DIAL FILMS (N Y) 


- 


Commls, prgms to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


TELEFILM INC(H'wood) 


52 Sh; etc 


Anim, commls to order 


16 


Spots $125-$2500 


TV CARTOON, INC (N Y) 


Car (Musical) series 


Anim, spcl effects 


35 & 16 


Anim $254 5 min 


TV WORLD, INC (H'wood) 


Var TV Sh in series 


Educ, travel films 


16 


OR 


TELENEWSiN Y) 


(See INS Listing) 


Library; spcl TV jobs 


35 & 16 


OR 


TRI-Z-FILMS(Chi) 


SS; 26 5-min TV Sh 


All types film jors 


16 


Spots $100- 
$10,000 


TRANSVIDEOCORPIN Y) 


4 F; 16 Sh 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


20th-FOX(N Y) 


Daily 10-15 min News 


Full facilities, all jobs 


35 & 16 


OR 


UNITED ARTISTS TV (N Y) 


20 Car; 10 F; 200 Sh 


- 


35 & 16 


OR 


UNITED TELEFILM (N Y) 


3 F; 13 OES; 6 Sh etc 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


OR 


VARIETY PICTURES i Dallas) 


50 3-min TV Sh 


Production to order 


35 & 16 


Rental $40 


VIOASONIC ENTRPiN Y) 


Var TV Sh series 


Anim, commls to order 


16 


OR 


VIDEO VARIETIES (N Y) 


Var TV Sli series 


Commls, prgms to order 


16 


Spots $500 up 


VISUAL SPECIALISTS IN Y) 


2Sh 


Production to order 


16 


Spots $100-$3000 


WILLARD PICTURES (N Y) 


- 


Shorts, commls, etc 


35 & 16 


Av. $1000 min 


WORLD VIDEO <N Y) 




Commls (TV clients only) 


16 


OR 


YOUNG AMERICA FILMS (NY) 


Var T\ Sh ilvlur 




16 


OR 


WPIX INC'N Y) 


13 F: W -c-k-s 




35 


OR 



' NBC-TV is contractual sales a?ent for various'Jerry Fairbanks-produced TV films. 

OR=On Request 

t Legend: Car=Cartoon, F=Feature, OES=Open-end Spots, OR= On Request, Sh:=Shorts, 
Sp=Sports, SS=Stocl Shots, Western=Western. 



comprise the panel for the study), the 
healthy increases shown above give 
clear evidence that TV advertising is 
on the upswing. 

This does not mean, however, that 
every broadcaster in TV is stuffing his 
safe-deposit box with cash. Time 
sales up, yes, but except for a few 
rare cases among the nation's over 
70 TV stations, TV station operat- 
ing expenses are still a good jump 
ahead of the financial returns from 
advertising. 

The year past has seen entire cate- 
gories of business become a major 
factor in TV air advertising. Taking 
100% to be the total number of "units 
of business" placed in any given 
month, and figuring percentage shares 
for the various categories on the air, 
the situation in June of 1948 for net- 
work TV showed the following: 



Category 


% 


Automotive 


20.0 


Food 


11.7 


Radio, TV, Appl. 


20.0 


Soap, Toiletries 


6.7 


Tobacco 


39.1 


Miscellaneous 


2.5 



A year later, in May of 1949, the 
situation had changed considerably. 
Beer and wine advertising, clothing, 
confectionery, and soft drinks, home 
furnishings, and drugs had become in- 
creasingly-important as TV advertisers. 
Auto advertising, up in terms of dollar 
volume, was down percentagewise due 
to the influx of new business, and was 
typical of those that had slipped in the 
per cent column. 

Here is where the network TV dol- 
lars come from in May, 1949: 



Category 


% 


Automotive 


14.0 


F'ood 


8.5 


Clothing 


7.1 


Radio, TV, Appl. 


25.4 


Soaps, Toiletries 


11.5 


Tobacco 


15.9 


Miscellaneous 


5.7 


Beer & Wine 


1.3 


Conf. & Soft Dr. 


4.0 


Home Furnishings 


5.8 


Drugs 


0.8 



In national selective and regional 
TV figures, comparing June of 1948 
and May of 1949 show similar effects 
in many of the same categories, for 
the same reasons: An unbalanced, but 
over-all increase in TV units of busi- 
ness. The entry of watch firms into 
TV on a wide scale was responsible 
largely for a sizeable increase in the 
share of the business placed at the na- 
tional-regional selective level in the 
jewelry category. That category went 
from having a 17.3% share of the 
business placed in June. 1948 to a 
30.8% (largest in this level of TV 
advertising) share in May. 1949. 

At the local-retail level of TV ad- 



106 



SPONSOR 



vertising. the entry into dealer adver- 
tising or local -firm TV advertising by 
many of the same categories (Jewelry, 
beer and wine, drugs, tobacco etc.) 
that had in the period June 1948-May 
1949 become major factors in TV ad- 
vertising also caused a major realign- 
ment of the percentage shares of TV 
business units placed. 

Here are the local retail percentages 
for June of 1948: 



mg 



Category 


% 


Automotive 


16.3 


Banks 


0.3 


Dept. Stores 


14.6 


Food 


8.0 


Home Furn. 


8.7 


Hotels & Rest. 


7.3 


Clothing 


11.0 


Personal Svces. 


8.6 


Radio, TV. Appl. 


26.9 


Miscellaneous 


8.3 



Twelve months later, in May of 
1949, the majority of these categories 
were off percentagewise, due to the 
failure of spending by these groups to 
match the spending being done by the 
categories that had become recently 
( usually about six months before I 
active in visual air advertising. 

Here are the figures for May. 1949. 
which show the changes caused by new 
local-retail business advertising in TV. 
by those firms who are finding that 
the visual air is the selling air: 



Category 


% 


Automotive 


12.9 


Banks 


4.3 


Dept. Stores 


8.0 


Food 


9.9 


Home Furn. 


3.9 


Hotels & Res. 


2.2 


Clothing 


7.3 


Personal Svces. 


8.3 


Radio. TV. Appl. 


24.7 


Miscellaneous 


13.4 


Jewelry 


1.7 


Beer & Wine 


0.9 


Drugs 


0.7 


Tobacco 


0.1 


Conf. & Soft Dr. 


1.7 



There are more changes to come 
this Fall. TV advertising will continue 
on the upgrade, and the amount of 
new money that will come in each 
category will not bear any relationship 
to new money in another. One thing 
is certain : TV is an important adver- 
tising factor in advertising plans of 
buyers of broadcast advertising at all 
economic levels. * * * 



FALL FORECAST 

(Continued from page 66) 

26. Building products and homes 
themselves have only now reached 
the point where it's possible to 
sell the consumer en masse on the 

advisability of modernizing or buying 
a home. In part, this has been made 
possible by the new multi-billion dol- 
lar bill passed by Congress to help low- 
cost housing and modernizing. Tests 



TV Available Live Package Programs 



TITLE 


TYPE 


TIME 


EXPLANATION 


PR00UCERSAGENT 


ABC BARN DANCE 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Americana, rustic humor 


ABC Spot Sales 


ACTORS STUDIO 


Drama 


30min, 1 wk 


One-act plays, short stories 


ABC & World Video 


ADD ANOTHER ONE 


Aud partic 


15 min, 


Visual quiz show 


Gerard Pick 


ADVENTURES OF CAESAR 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Live-film story of a lovable dog 


John Gibl s 


AMERICAN LEGEND 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Live-film dramatizations 


Martin Video 


AT HOME WITH MANVILLES 


( 'nllU'ilv 


30 min, 1/wk 


Light domestic comedy 


Gordon M. Day 


ADVENTURES, FU MANCHU 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Sax Rohmer's famous Mystery 


Basch Radio & TV 


AFTER DINNER SCIENCE 


Hobby 


15 min, 


Do-it-yourself science tricks 


Olio Video 


ALL ABOUT PEOPLE 


Interview 


15 min, 1/wk 


Ruth Ley chats 


NBC Spot Sales 


BALLET STORY TIME 


Dance 


15 min, 1/wk 


Fairy tales in dance form 


Video Drama 


BAL0RAMA 


Dance 


15-30 min, 


Ballet and modern dance program 


A. S. Anderson 


RED BARBER SPORTS 


Sports 


30 min, 1/wk 


Live-film sports quiz show 


John Gibbs 


BETWEEN US GIRLS 


Aud partic 


15-30 min. 


Potpourri of feminine news 


Film Features 


BLIND DATE 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


The famous wartime show 


Bernard Schupert 


B0MBA, JUNGLE BOY 


Drama 


15 min, 5 wk 


Bomba and his young animal friends 


Adv TV Svce 


BRIGHT SIDE 


Musical 


30 min, 1 /wk 


Topical revue 


Ted Nelson 


BROADWAY DETECTIVE 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


A whodunit 


West Hooker 


BRUNCH AT BLACKST0NE 


Interview 


30 min, 1/wk 


Celebrities "branching" 


H. S. Laufman 


CAPTAIN O'ROURKE 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Live-film mystery series 


Martin Video 


CARL'S SURPRISE PCKGE 


Variety 


15 min, 2/wk 


Kid's show with clowns, puppets 


NBC Spot Sales 


CAROL CALLING 


Musical 


15 min, 2/wk 


Carol Reed sings, chats 


WPTZ & NBC 


CARTOON COMICS 


Variety 


15 min, 5/wk 


Kid's show with Pete Boyle 


WPTZ & NBC 


CARTOON TELETALES 


Drama 


30 min, 


Animal stories for moppet set 


ABC Spot Sales 


CHILDREN'S DISK JOCKEY 


Musical 


15 min, 2/wk 


Colby plays kid's recordings 


Video Events 


CONCENTRATE ON YOU 


Aud partic 


15 min, 1/wk 


Educational identification dramas 


Video Drama 


LARRY COTTON 


Musical 


15 min, 1/wk 


Larry Cotton sings 


WKY-TV 


COURT OF CURRENT ISSUES 


Interview 


60 min, 1 /wk 


Discussion program 


Irvin Paul Sulds 


CRAZY AUCTION 


Aud partic 


15-60 min, 


Charity auctions and gag situations 


Tri-Z-Films 


CURTAIN CALL 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Percival Wilde's one-act plays 


Hile-Damroth 


CUSTOMER IS RIGHT 


Comedy 


15 min, 3/wk 


Situation comedy 


Ted Nelson 


DATE FOR THREE 


Comedy 


30 min, 1 /wk 


Problems of college students 


Adv TV Svce 


DINNER PLATTER 


Musical 


60 min, 5/wk 


TV disk jockey show 


WEWS 


DISTAFF 


Home svce 


partic, 5/wk 


TV women's show with news 


WEWS 


DOC'S SWAP SHOP 


Variety 


15-30 min, 


Storekeeper sells anything 


Ted Nelson 


DOLLARS AND SENSE 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Quiz show testing five senses 


World Video 


DOUBLE YOuR MONEY BACK 


Comedy 


15 min, 


One-man comedy show 


Waas Assocs 


DR FIX UM 


Home svce 


15-30 min, 


Household hints 


ABC Spot Sales 


DUDE RANCH 


Musical 


30 min, 1 /wk 


Hillbilly variety 


WTVR 


EYE-QUIZ 


Aud partic 


var, 1/wk 


Charades 


KSTP-TV 


.">UKE FAGIN 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Sophisticated action detective series 


Video Events 


FAITH HOPE & CHARLEY 


Comedy 


30 min, 1/wk 


Situation comedy 


George Abbott 


FAVILY PARTY 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Pie-in-the-face gasrs, stunts 


KSTP-TV 


FAMILY QUIZ 


Quiz 


8-12 min, 


TV version of magazine photo quiz 


Haves- Parnell 


FARE ENOUGH 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Travel quiz with trips as prizes 


Basch Radio & TV 


SKIP FARRELL SHOW 


Variety 


15 min, 1/wk 


Skip Farrell sings. 


ABC Spot Sales 


FATHER & SON 


Drama 


IS min, 5/wk 


Walter Abel, answers kids 


Ted Nelson 


FLAME SHOW 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Jive show, featuring "Three Flames" 


West Hooker 


FLORAL TRAIL 


Home svce 


15 min, 1/wk 


Joyce Smith, garden expert 


WDSl'-TV 


FLYING CARPET 


Variety 


15 min, 1/wk 


Harem revue with comic Caliph 


Visual Arts 


FROM NOWHERE TO B WAY 


Variety 


30-60 min, 


Talent-search show 


Jules Zieder 


GARR0WAY AT-LARGE 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Dave Garroway and his friends 


NBC 


GEORGIA MAE 


Musical 


10 min, 1/wk 


Telegenic Georgia Mae 


WBZ-TV & NBC 


GOLDEN SPOTLIGHT 


Musical 


15 min, 1/wk 


High-brow musical an 1 dance talent 


Visual Arts 


GISM0 G00DKIN 


Variety 


30 min, 4 /wk 


Puppet tells fairy tales 


WKY-TV 


BUMP HADLEY PITCHING 


Sports 


15 min, 2/wk 


Sports news of day an d sports guests 


WBZ-TV & NBC 


HEADLINE MYSTERIES 


Drama 


15 min, 5 wk 


Real-life crimes are acte I out 


Georze Abbott 



18 JULY 1949 



107 



conducted by WNEW in conjunction 
with the much-publicized Bendix wash- 
er and Levittown experiment proved 
that radio can move homes by the hun- 
dreds, and that it can sell homes even 
before they are built. 

Housing will use broadcast advertis- 
ing in a healthy manner this year. De- 
velopers of acreage will also use radio 
this Fall, as they have been using it 
this spring and summer. There is a 
million-plus home shortage in the U. S. 
Builders are looking forward to filling 
the void and the record of broadcast 
advertising in helping them is interest- 
ing, to say the least. 

27. Soft drink sales have held up 
this past summer. In fact the extra 
hot weather has helped many bottlers 
hit new highs. Some of these bottlers 
will start advertising this Fall to try 
to keep the business that the hot 
weather has brought them. Pepsi-Cola 
and Coca-Cola will battle it out on 
the network air, but in this battle it 
will be almost unfair competition since 
Coke has millions where as Pepsi has 
thousands. There will be little change 
in the soft drink picture this Fall. 

28. Book sales, off this Spring, will 
rebound this Fall as more workers 
have more leisure reading time. Ad- 
vertising will continue to be placed on 
an "immediate-results" basis, as there 
is no long-term thinking in the pub- 
lishing field. Books are not sold be- 
cause Random House, for instance, 
publishes them, but because the par- 
ticular book is desired by the advertis- 
ing reader or listener. Millions of 
books have been sold on the air. but 
the desire to read generally has yet 
to be promoted by the medium. 

29. Home furnishings, with the ex- 
ception of floor coverings and a 
tiny group of furniture manufac- 
turers like Kroehler, have not 
been nationally advertised, except 
through the limited-appeal "shelter 
magazines." Last season Bigelow- San- 
ford bought a TV program of popu- 
lar appeal, Mohawk Carpet sponsored 
a musical TV Showroom, and Bonafide 
Mills presented a number of TV pro- 
grams for Bonny Maid floor coverings. 
All are expected back to the visual 
medium this Fall, with more along with 
them. They have a great deal to learn 
about how to sell home furnishings on 
the air, but then most television ad- 
vertisers have plenty to learn about 
the medium. 

The most successful users of the air 



TV Available Live Package Programs 



TITLE 


TYPE TIME 


EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER AGENT 


HERE COMES TEENA 


Comedy 


30 min. 1 wk 


Situation comedy 


Video Drama 


HIGH ADVENTURE 


Drama 


30 min, 1 wk 


Suspense mysteries 


George Abbott 


HOBBY MERRY-GO-ROUND 


I*ob'>y 


15 min, 1 wk 


Different hobbies 


KSTP-TV 


HUGO THE HORSE 


Comedy 


15 min, 1 wk 


Evans family, and horse, Hugo 


-Julian Lesser 


I'D LIKE TO SEE 


Variety 


30 min, 1 wk 


Old newsreel clips 


B. E. Karlen 


IF YOU HAO THE CHANCE 


Aul partic 


30 min, 3 wk_ 


Wish-fulfillment show 


B. E. Karlen 


ITEM PICTORIAL PARADE 


News 


10 min, 5/wk 


Latest news pin 


WDSU-TV 


ITS A HIT 


Awl partic 


30 min, 


Quiz show with baseball gimmick 


David Sievers 


JUNIOR PARADE 


Variety 


15 min, 1 wk 


Child talent show 


WNHC-TV 


JUST US KIDS 


Variety 


HO min, 1 wk 


Dave Kaigler reads comics. 


WCAU-TV 


KIDS ATHLETIC CLUB 


Sports 


30 min, 2 wk 


Boy's clubs compete 


West Hooker 


LADIES BE SEATED 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Female audience with stunts, Bans 


ABC Spot Sales 


LAFF LAB 


Comedy 


15 min, 1 wk 


Bill Thompson demonstrates quirks 


Mitchell Gertz 


LAND OF THE FABLE 


Drama 


15-20 min, 


Live talent, puppets act out fables 


Film Features 


LATIN FANTASY 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Pancho and his orchestra 


Martin Video 


LAZY-H RANCH 


Musical 


H) min, 2 wk 


Western songs 


W'AAM 


LETS GO EXPLORING 


Interview 


30 min, 1 wk 


Famous explorers show films 


Gerard Pick 


LET S PLAY REPORTER 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1 wk 


M.C. gives out "assignments" 


Basch Radio & TV 


LIVES OF FOUR WOMEN 


Comedy 


30 min, 1,'wk 


Live-film soap opera 


Visual Arts 


EVELYN LYNNE SINGS 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Evelyn sings and kibitzes 


WKY-TV 


MANHATTAN HOST 


Interview 


30 min, 1 /wk 


Eddie Black visits 


Martin Video 


HUGH MARTIN SHOW 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Hugh Martin and guests 


George Abbott 


HOWARD MILLER SPORTS 


Sports& 


15 min, 7 wk 


News and views of world of sports 


Republic TV 


MIMI'S MUSIC SHOP 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Mimi Benzell and Felix Knight 


Gainsborough 


MODES & MANNERS 


Aui partic 


30 min, 1 wk 


Low-down on etiquette 


Jules Ziejler 


MONSIEUR GERARD 


Drama 


15-20 min, 


Educational soaper 


Him Features 


BRET MORRISON SHOW 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Capsule musical short stories 


Barnard Sackett 


MUNRO LEAF CLUBHOUSE 


Hobby 


30 min, 1 wk 


Kid's show 


Hile-Damroth 


MUSI-CAMERA 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Musical pantomines 


Video Drama 


MUSIC FROM EVERYWHERE 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Folk songs of different countries 


Gerard Pick 


MUSIC GAME 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Guest stars, popular recordings 


WCAU-TV 


MUSIC SHOP 


Variety 


15 min, 1 wk 


Ben Taylor m.c.'s light musical show 


WTVR 


MYSTERY MISS 


Variety 


30 min, 1 wk 


A gorgeous masked singer 


Martin Video 


NAME YOU WILL REMEMBER 


News 


5 min, var 


Lang's short, punchy profiles 


Clau le Barrere 


NATURE OF THINGS 


Hobby 


15 min, 1/wk 


Dr. Roy Marshall's science talks 


WPTZ & NBC 


NEW ORLEANS SHOWCASE 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Capsule review from Blue Room 


WDSU-TV 


NEW VOICES 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Simulcast talent-search show 


WDSU-TV 


NOCTURNE 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Julia Herman plays light harp music 


WKY-TV 


CLAIRE NUN SHOW 


Musical 


15 min, 1 wk 


Song stylist Nunn 


WDSU-TV 


JEAN O'BRIEN 


Interview 


15 min, 1 wk 


Visiting firemen and personalities 


WNHC-TV 


OH! CANDANCE 


Drama 


30 min, 1 wk 


Situation come ly 


Sanft-Costa 


ONCE UPON A TIME 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Pat Adair pantomines stories 


Jules Ziegler 


ONE NIGHT STAND 


Musical 


30 min. 1 wk 


Series of "one-nighters" 


World Video 


OPERA THEATER 


Musical 


BO min, 1 wk 


English versions of famous operas 


Video Events 


OPERATION FUN CLUB 


Variety 


15-30 min, 


Leon Janney does "Uncle Don" 


Hartley 


OUR HOUSE 


Comedy 


30 min, 1/wk 


Engaging family drama series 


Video Events 


OUT OF PRINT 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Dramatizations of news 


Ted Nelson 


PARTY TIME 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Viewers throw their parties 


Martin Video 


FATS PICHON SHOW 


Musical 


15 min, 1,'wk 


Fats Pichon at jazz piano 


WDSU-TV 


PLEASANT PASTIMES 


Hobby- 


30 min, 1 wk 


Unusual hobbies 


WKY-TV 


POWWOW 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Indian songs, dances, adventures 


Video Events 


RF D. AMERICA 


Quiz 


30 min, 1 wk 


Famous farm quiz program 


NBC 


RHUMBA CLUB 


Musical 


30 min, 1 wk 


Rhuniba lessons on TV 


WTMJ-TY 


RHYTHMASTERS 


Musical 


30 min. 1 wk 


Live-film musical sessions 


Martin Video 


ROLL CALL OF SPORTS 


Sports 


15 min, 1 wk 


Dowty discusse ssports topics 


WDSU-TV 


ROLLER DERBY 


Sports 


110 min, 3 wk 


Mavhem on roller skates 


MCA & ABC 



108 



SPONSOR 



TV Available 


Live Paekage Programs 


TITLE 


TYPE 


TIME 


EXPLANATION 


PRODUCER AGENT 


SAVOYARDS 


Musical 


15-30 m in, 


Gilbert & Sullivan 


H. S. Laufman 


SAY CAN YOU SEE 


Ami partic 


30 min, 1 wk 


"New" John Reed King quiz 


Hile-Damroth 


SAY IT WITH ACTING 


Auil partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


B'way shows Casts play charades 


West Hooker 


SCIENCE CIRCUS 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Popular science and dramatizations 


ABC Spot Sales 


SCIENCE ON PARADE 


News 


30 min, 1/wk 


Scientific news 


Olio Video 


SEEING IS BELIEVING 


Quiz 


15-30 min, 


Viewer-quiz with puzzles 


Ralph Powers 


SHOW BUSINESS 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Musical-comedy performers 


Visual Arts 


SIDEWALKS OF NEW YORK 


Musical 


60 min, 1/wk 


Eddie' Dowling stars in revue 


Jules Ziegler 


SING-A-GAME 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Oscar Brand sings folk songs 


Video Events 


SMITHS & THE NEWS 


News 


15 min, 5/wk 


American family views news 


Irvin Paul Sulds 


SONG STYLINGS 


Musical 


15 min, 1/wk 


Williams and Moran sing 


WTMJ-TV 


SO YOU WANT BROADWAY 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1 ,'wk 


TV "screen test" 


Visual Arts 


SPORT HEADLINERS 


Sports 


15 min, 


Sports review with Dunphy 


Hartley 


SPORTING EYE 


Sports 


15 min. 


Viewers test knowledge of sports 


Ralph Powers 


SPORTS ROOM FINAL 


Sports 


15 min, 5 wk 


Late results from world of sports 


WAAM 


STAND BY FOR CRIME 


Drama 


30 min, 1 ,'wk 


Inspector Webb whodunits 


ABC 


STAR BOARDERS 


Drama 


30 min, 1 /wk 


Typical theatrical boarding house 


Ted Nelson 


STUDIO PARTY 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1 wk 


Johnny Slagle m.c.'s quiz show 


WXYZ-TV 


STARLIT STAIRWAY 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Talent-search show. 


WXYZ-TV 


TAKE A MISTAKE 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Contestants guess error 


Ted Nelson 


TEEN TOWN HALL 


Variety 


30 min, 1 wk 


Of, by, and for, teen-agers 


Martin Video 


TELEFOTO NEWS 


News 


5 min, 5/wk 


Locally-produced news show. Film 


KSTP-TV 


TELEKIDS 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Moppet talent, games, cartoons 


WDSU-TV 


TELE-PUPPETS THEATRE 


Variety 


12 min, 1 ,'wk 


Puppets act out situation comedy 


Jack Parker 


TELE SKETCHES 


Interview 


15 min, 5/wk 


Joe Kaliff sketches famous guests 


Basch Radio & TV 


TV BAR-TEN RANCH 


Variety 


30 min, 5/wk 


Western songs and cowboy films 


WCAU-TV 


TV CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Viewers fill out crossword puzzles 


Harry S. Goodman 


TELEVISION SALUTE 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Adult talent-search show 


WNHC-TV 


TV SPORTSCAST 


Sports 


13 min, 6/wk 


Sports interviews and news 


N. J. Malter 


TV SPORTS WORLD 


Sports 


15 min, 5 'wk 


Daily sports round-up of latest news 


WCAU-TV 


TV TELEPHONE GAME 


Aud partic 


15 min, 


Legal bingo 


Harry S. Goodman 


TELEWORD 


Aud partic 


15 min, 


Crossword puzzles on TV. Prizes 


Al Bufhngton 


THREE FLAMES 


Musical 


15 min, 5 wk 


Jivy, colored trio with comedy 


West Hooker 


TOPIC OF THE DAY 


Mr. & Mrs. 


15-30 min, 


Table chit-chat, gossip and guests 


Film features 


TOP OF THE EVENING 


Variety 


30 min, 1/wk 


Revue around a theatrical "angel" 


World Video 


TROUBLE SHOOTER 


Comedy 


15-30 min, 


The life of a Jack-of-all-trades 


Ted Nelson 


GEORGE VAN KELT 


Drama 


30 min, 1 wk 


Dramatized archeology 


Visual Arts 


VIDEO CLUES 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


TV quiz in which viewers participate 


Adv TV Svce 


VIZ-QUIZ OF 2 CITIES 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Visual quiz 


Al Buffington 


VERA WALLACE 


Drama 


30 min, 1 wk 


Girl solves murders 


Film Features 


WANTED 


Drama 


5 min, 5/wk 


TV version of police posters 


Visual Arts 


WE'LL FIX IT FOR SURE 


Variety 


15 min, 1/wk 


Slapstick solutions to problems 


Visual Arts 


WESTERN BALLADIER 


Musical 


30 min, 1/wk 


Cowboy songs and story line 


WPTZ & NBC 


WHAT AM 1 BID 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Auctioneer sells 


Visual Arts 


WHAT'S C00KIN7 


Home svce 


partic, 1/wk 


How to cook just about anything 


KSTP-TV 


WEST 67TH ST. 


Drama 


30 min, 1/wk 


Backstage life of young actors 


Barnard Sackett 


PAUL WHITEMAN CLUB 


Variety 


60 min, 1/wk 


Talent jamboree 


ABC 


WHO'S CHAMP? 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Viewers compete 


Sanft-Costa 


WILE AND GENE 


Musical 


15 min, 2/wk 


Western songs and situation comedy 


WKY-TV 


WIN-PLACE SHOW 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Quiz game with racetrack gimmick 


Richman 


WOMAN'S VIDEO JOURNAL 


Home svce 


15 min, 1/wk 


Fashion news, food hints, gossip 


WTVR 


KEN WRIGHT 


Musical 


15 min, 1/wk 


Ken Wright at the organ 


WKY-TV 


YOU CAN DO IT 


Home svce 


15 min, 5/wk 


Practical household hints 


Sanft-Costa 


YOUR HEALTH 


News 


15 min, 1/wk 


News and medical discoveries 


Olio Video 


YOURS TRULY 


Aud partic 


30 min, 1/wk 


Hull and writing analyst Stafford 


Gainsborough 


YOU TOO CAN BE LOVELY 


Home svce 


15 min, 5/wk 


Leo de Bray tells all 


Basch Radio & TV 



to sell home furnishings are the time- 
payment merchandisers. All over the 
nation there are stores that broadcast 
advertising has built. These stores 
will be selling hot and heavy this Fall 
because they'll have furnishings to sell 
at prices the public wants to pay now, 
and because there are no governmental 
restrictions to the terms on which they 
can sell. There will also be consider- 
able cooperative advertising money to 
be spent by these stores. 

30. Automobile accessories do not 
sell themselves. The manufacturers 
that supply the automobile firms with 
the accessories also sell them under 
their own tradenames and have an as- 
sociation budget that runs into the 
millions to establish a buy-from-the- 
original-maker theme. 

Individual firms have cooperative 
budgets and several firms besides Elec- 
tric Auto-Lite and Fram will be using 
network time to fight for the lush ac- 
cessory business. 

31. Travel and vacation resort 
business wasn't as good this sum- 
mer as it was last year — but it was 

good. The resorts that did the "extra" 
business were frequently those that 
used broadcast advertising to sample 
their wares to the public. This Fall 
these resorts will continue to use radio 
to sample their services. Vacations are 
no longer restricted to the ten weeks 
of the summer, they're an all year 
round business — and broadcast adver- 
tising will help the resorts get, and 
hold, the business. 

Railroads have plans to promote 
special Fall all-inclusive excursions, ski 
trains and a number of other specials 
that should increase business. All these 
will be air-promoted. 

Planes will also increase their use 
of advertising on and off the air. Re- 
cent crashes and near-crashes of over- 
seas air transports hasn't helped air 
business, especially when some of the 
near accidents had big-name perform- 
ers like Danny Kaye aboard. There'll 
be plenty of travel advertising this 
Fall. 

Many things can happen to make the 
plans reported in this forecast blow 7 
up in smoke. Last year the forecast 
was, happily over 85% correct, spon- 
sor covered less industries in its 1948 
Fall Facts Forecast than it has this 
year. However, the sources made avail- 
able to sponsor are of the best. This 
is the way the Fall situation looks as 
sponsor goes to press with Fall Facts: 
1949. * * * 



19 



18 JULY 1949 



109 




Fall Facts 

Broadcast advertising has grown so 
much during the past 12 months that 
this year, perhaps more than ever, 
sponsor's Fall Facts edition is an es- 
sential guide to the immediate future. 
Its regrettable that there's no new sta- 
tion-by-station evaluation of listening 
for advertisers. There are no new maps 
of the networks which sponsor could 
publish without being open to criticism 
of mixing research apples and oranges 
to arrive at coverage patterns. Never- 
theless there are in Fall Facts literally 
hundreds of tools to enable sponsors 
to understand what has happened and 
is happening to broadcast advertising. 

Visual advertising on the air has 
assumed the stature of a full-fledged 
medium with daily viewing by millions. 
FM has entered a new constructive 
stage. There's no longer one network 



that leads all the rest in size of audi- not even sure whether your account 

ences. Even network Standards of will be yours, or whether your firm will 

Practice have undergone vast changes, be spending any budget come Septem- 

Literally, Broadcast Advertising: ber. 

L949-1950 is a different medium than Accounts are changing agencies al- 

its predecessor, Broadcast Advertising: most daily. Sponsors are getting "new" 

1948-1949. ideas on how to use different media 

sponsor hopes that in this Fall Facts almost hourly. Fourth-round wage in- 

issue it has introduced you intelligently creases aren't the rule, but they're 

to what it firmly believes to be the being asked frequently enough to make 

world's greatest distribution tool — the management thinking not too certain 

air during the next 12 months. about advertising. 

All of which raises the question, 

Hi ■ . ... - "How're vou working this summer?" 

ow re you working this summer? c f , . . 

oome agencies and advertising de- 
It's been a scorcher thus far this partments are foregoing their short 
vacation period. What has made it Mondays (get in late) and Fridays 
worse is the fact that agencies and I leave early ) . As rapidly as top man- 
advertisers have been right up against agements of sponsors arrive at even 
the buzz saw. Managements for literally tentative decisions, these active agen- 
thousands of firms have adopted a cies and departments go to work on 
"wait and see" attitude. Commitments plans. They're in there battling, 
for fall advertising are far behind It isn't pleasant to have to sweat 
schedule. There are exceptions, of it out — even in air-cooled offices, 
course, but they are in the nature of Nevertheless, that's the way it's going 
advertisers having been sold on coming to be this summer. There's going to be 
back to the air, newspaper, or maga- a great deal of "waiting at the church" 
zine advertising after a summer hiatus before advertising plans and produc- 
earlier than usual, or continuing to tion are on their way. There's going to 
advertise throughout the summer. Ex- be a great deal of wet-nursing before 
ceptions also have been noted for selec- new plans are okayed, 
tive and local-retail air advertisers. The agency or advertising depart- 
Reasons for the latter are ticked off ment that takes it easy this summer 
under Applause on this page. may have no campaigns to worry about 

By and large, it hasn't been a pleas- this fall, 

ant season for the advertising profes- Not a pleasant thought — but "did 

sion. It's one thing to take it easy you hear of .the multi- 

when you know that budgets are set million-dollar advertising account that 

and that your account or firm will be just changed agencies, and about 

in high advertising gear once the sum- the new advertising man- 

mer is over. It's another to try and be ager of ?" It all 

calm. cool, and collected when you're happened in the good old summertime. 



Applause 



Broadcast selling is up 

Almost since radio began, there's 
been very little aggressive selling of 
broadcast advertising. For years ad- 
vertisers turned to the air because they 
decided on their own volition that it 
would sell for them. Sales records of 
the networks and stations will consis- 
tently show that most of the great 
manufacturing companies became 
broadcast advertisers without so much 
as an original solicitation. 

Once on the air, sponsors have been 
apple-polished to extinction. Networks 
and stations have battled for each air 



advertiser's business. Accounts have 
been spoon-fed until a high percentage 
of them have used broadcast advertis- 
ing as keystones of their business. 

The cold canvas, the actual test of 
real sales intensiveness. has been shun- 
ned, up to recently. It isn't any more. 

While its still true that a number of 
new broadcast advertisers continue to 
come to the air without being sold by 
stations or networks, there's an in- 
creasing number of sales being made, 
not just serviced, by radio. 

Two leading advertisers in Canada 
who had cancelled their schedules for 
the summer reinstated them when their 



agencies fought the cancellations with 
facts and figures. (We're happy that 
they were in part SPONSOR-supplied fig- 
ures.) U. S. Steel, which has in the 
past stayed off the air during the sum- 
mer, is sponsoring the NBC Symphony 
for the summer. Philco. which had no 
intention of coming back to TV before 
the fall, has been sold on returning in 
the middle of the summer. Gruen 
Watch, for years not a continuous net- 
work sponsor, will underwrite half of 
Hollywood Calling on NBC. Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet. a big nighttime spon- 
sor, will join the daytime brigade this 
fall. Business comes to him who works. 



110 



SPONSOR 



<y 




a good maiw?i^^ 

DESERVES A GOOD SALESMAN 





Put WHAS to work for you in 




The only radio station serving and sellin g 
all of the rich Ken tuck/ana Market 



^ Figure! given for Kenluckiana include oil 
countiei in which WHAS gives 50% or- 
betler BMB daytime coverage. "Radio fom 
■ lies" (rom BMB 1946 and 1948 itoliiticj. 
'"Net Effective Buying Income" from Solei 
Management Survey of Buying Power. 



50,000 WATTS 



l-A CLEAR CHANNEL 



840 KILOCYCLES 



Victor A. Sholis, Director 



J. Mac Wynn, Safes Di'recfor 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY AND COMPANY 




'-pO RADIO 

■*■ influential in evCr.y 4 'W 

For a quarter-century- : \ 

all Southeastern Oh'ip'. w*ic 



larly designed for specralfl 
After 25 years whatcuVj 
ing to Mr. Hooper, 
rated stations in' the -nVf, 
share of audience. ' 

After 25 years how"i,s7.i5 
Over 60 retail accounts.* 
WHIZ for 5 years, or "tttg) 

On the threshold of 
preparing to bring "teleyij^ 
Southeastern. Ohio— r^a-'^'i 
service through the yearns 



V£RNON A. NOLT€, MANACrlNCr DIRECTOR 



/IGUST 1949 • $8.00 a Year 




Radio audience: 1949 — p. 21 

Bering farm commercial — p. 30 

Chicago laundry story — p. 24 

How to sample a vacation — p. 32 

The "Cisco Kid" sells the outdoors too — p. 32 



J H I i ' ¥ « C to ii "> V N C I i V N 

3 n v k- d - ; - 3 "t * » •• i ■»'».? 
8 2 2 1 




CISCO KID TmDAY ' THURSDAY, SATURDAY 5:00 -5:30. p.m. WKN A 



V 



\\\i/'S 



Even now 

before B. C. the G 
we're packing/ em 





Yes, even before Bing Crosby comes in with the spec- 
tacular new CBS lineup in the Fall, WHAS listener- 
ship figures are zooming . . . outstripping all other 
stations in the rich Kentuckiana market. 

In the last year WHAS was the only Kentuckiana 
station to increase its roster of top Hooperated pro- 
grams morning, afternoon AND evening!* 

Credit this to the happy combination of CBS pro- 
gramming and WHAS shows. "Coffee Call" is a good 
example ... an aromatic blend of enthusiastic house- 
wives in the WHAS studio plus thousands of buy- 
minded housewives in Kentuckiana homes. 



For Fall booking with plenty of punch take note of 
the WHAS audience ratings before Bing . . . add the 
Groaner . . . then figure in the rest of the great CBS 
Fall Lineup. It proves WHAS the gilt-edged, rock-solid 
buy of the '49 Kentuckiana Fall Season. 

*Source: 47-48 and 48-49 Winter-Spring Reports. 



^ 



COFFEE CALL is an audience participation 
show with prizes from participating sponsors. 
It has won 2 national awards: NRDGA National Radio 
Award ( "the best woman's program" ) and CCNY Award 
of Merit ("most effective direct-selling program"). 
Talent: M.C. Jim Walton, organist Herbie Koch. Spon- 
sors: Delmonico Foods, Louisville Provision Co., Van 
Allmen Foods. 



Come This fall, choice seats 

( "availabilities" to you J for the Great WHAS-CdS Show 

will be hard to find. Reserve yours now! 

Call your PETRY man! 







50,000 WATTS 1A CLEAR CHANNEL 840 KILOCYCLES 

VICTOR A. SHOLIS, Director J. MAC WYNN, Sales Director 

THE ONLY RADIO STATION SERWXG AND SELLISG ALL THE RICH KENTUCKIANA MARKET 



: 



TS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 



^FCEIVE 



I.-. SPONSOR REPORT 



Senior webs to use 

new promotional 

approach this fall 



Toni passes 

70,000,000-wave 

sales mark 



Bulova leads 
TV commercials 



Italian and Polish 

broadcasters to 

sell as group 



Camera dealers 

buy Bell and 

Howell transcribed 

breaks 

Bread broadcasting 

to regain pre-strike 

status quo 



Retail and service 

advertisers swing 

to saturation 



TV broadcast 
advertising un- 
changed this fall 



AUG 2 1949 

"BC GENERAL LIBftwy 



1 August 1949 



CBS and NBC fall promotional campaigns will be different than any 
thus far attempted by either chain. NBC will avoid ratings and con- 
centrate on "effectiveness," CBS will stress #1 and low-cost Colum- 
bia audiences. Battle will be good for broadcasting. 

-SR- 
Toni in five years has sold over 70,000,000 permanent wave kits, 
changed women's home care of hair, and currently does 1.3% of total 
wholesale drug business and 1% of total retail drug-store business 
in U.S. Drug outlets handle over 10,000 individual items, which 
makes Toni's 1% even more amazing. Toni is still a prime user of 
broadcast advertising. 

-SR- 

Study, made by Advertest Research, of commercial effectiveness on 
TV, placed Bulova first, Philip Morris second, Hi-V third, Chevrolet 
fourth, Lucky Strike fifth. 

-SR- 
Setup to help sponsors reach foreign-language markets of United 
States is well under way. Italian and Polish are first language 
groups served by broadcasting to be available as a package in all 
metropolitan markets. 

-SR- 
Interest of camera dealers in broadcast advertising is seen through 
their purchase of Bell and Howell transcribed announcements featur- 
ing Hollywood stars. Price is $5. Most dealer transcriptions are 
made available without charges. 

-SR- 

What strike does to brand-buying is indicated through W0R (N.Y.) 
survey of advertised breads in homes, before and after strike. Non- 
striking Silvercup, among top five prior to strike, was found in 
half the homes after settlement. Other four — Bond, Tip Top, Tays- 
tee, and Wonder — are fighting via broadcasting to regain leadership. 

-SR- 
Indicative of local-retail sponsor trend towards saturation broad- 
cast advertising is Texas Engine Service schedule on KNUZ, Houston. 
Texas Engine buys 6 quarter-hours, 2 half-hours, 70 time signals 
weekly. 

-SR- 
Despite decision by FCC to place part of TV in UHF, it will be some 
time before it becomes important in life of TV viewers. Television 
advertisers can forget it contributing to or detracting from visual 
service for coming season. 



SPONSOR, Volume :i. No. is. 1 August, 1949. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc., 3110 Elm, Baltimore 11. Md. Executive, Advertising, Editorial, circulation 
Offices 4U W. 52 St.. N. Y. 111. $8 a year in V. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act :: Match is;;. 



I AUGUST 1949 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS.. .SPONSOR 



WJR cuts cut-in 
charges 



Flour competition 

to hit new high 

in 1949-50 



-SR- 
Making localizing of network programs easier and less expensive, 
WJR, Detroit, has set pace for the industry with flat service rate 
for local cut-ins regardless of time of day, rather than charge 
higher announcement fees. 

-SR- 
Flour organizations are facing fact that U.S. processing facilities 
are 50% in excess of those required for domestic consumption. With 
continental grain-growing areas cutting down Europe's demand for 
American wheat, competition for business will be toughest it has 
been in past ten years. Result is that millers like Pillsbury 
(adding sponsorship of "House Party") and General Mills (adding TV 
version of "Lone Ranger") will be spending more ad-dollars than 
ever before in 1949-1950. They'll be diversifying products also. 
General Mills will introduce its Betty Crocker automatic toaster 
this fall. 



Radio still 

in third ad 

place 



Rice group 

studies Puerto 

Rico story 



-SR- 
Most estimates of advertising expenditures for 1949 place radio 
third, as it was in 1947 and 1948. Direct mail continues first 
with double the money spent on air. Newspapers continue in sec- 
ond place, crowding direct mail closely. 

-SR- 
History of successful rice broadcast advertising in Puerto Rico 
is being studied by Rice Consumer Service. Product hasn't re- 
ceived much air attention in U.S., but radio has moved great 
quantities in PR. Rice crop in U.S. will be double in 1949, and 
producers must increase U.S. consumption. 

-Please turn to page 40- 



IN THIS ISSUE 



capsuled highlights 



Radio delivers the greatest audience and page 21 

the greatest show on earth. Some ideas of its 
dimensions are presented in the newest BMB 
report. 

Small retailers can combine in associations page 24 
and use broadcast advertising within meager 
budgets. 

Dealer co-op advertising from the sponsors' page 26 
point of view. What it can do, and why it 
belongs in a radio advertising budget. 

Advertising agency publicity depart- page 28 

ments: their place in the broadcast advertising 

picture. 

Pinpointed commercials are not being writ- page 32 
ten. How badly the agencies are faltering is 
reported in a SPONSOR-University of Okla- 
homa study. 



Radio production departments in agencies page 36 
lose money. The Mr. Sponsor Asks question 
is WHY? 

Minute TV station breaks are N.G. SPON- page 48 
SOR's report on this phase of visual adver- 
tising explains why. 

IN FUTURE ISSUES 

The "tear up the rate card" problem. 15 Aug. 

Research portfolio for a sponsor. 15 Aug. 

The 4-network promotion outlook for the 15 Aug. 
fall. 

Who's selling broadcast advertising 29 Aug. 
short? 



SPONSOR 



IflMN. .. SPONSORS REPORT. 



SPONSORS REPORT . . 



Just talked to Bill Peterson on the telephone and, as usual, 
he took a considerable amount of time telling me what you are 
doing in the way of helping us promote our radio programs on 
Station KALL and all the rest of the Intermountain Network. ' 

Believe me, I would be remiss in my duties if I did not devote 
a portion of this letter to telling you that last year's business 
throughout the areas covered by the Intermountain Network 
was excellent and great progress was made. 

We feel that one of the principal reasons is because of the 
outstanding coverage the Intermountain Network offers to its 
clients and particularly the wonderful merchandising and 
promotional activities conducted by your men. 

There is nothing I can say that would adequately express my 
organization's appreciation to you for this cooperation. 

Yesterday I spoke to Mr. E. M. Finehout, our Vice President in 
Charge of Sales and Advertising, and he said, by all means we owe 
you one thing — thanks for some real cooperation. 

W. J. TORMEY 
Sales Manager Branch Offices 
WHITE KING SOAP CO. 



21 HOME TOWN MARKETS COMPRISE 
THE INTERMOUNTAIN NETWORK 



UTAH 

KALL, Salt Lake City 
KLO, Ogden 
KOVO, Provo 
KOAL, Price 
KVNU, Logan 
KSVC, Richfield 
KSUB, Cedar City 

IDAHO 

KFXD, Boise-Nampa 
KFXD-FM, Boise-Nampa 
KVMV, Twin Falls 
KEYY, Pocatello 
KID, Idaho Falls 



WYOMING 

KVRS, Rock Springs 
KOWB, Laramie 
KDFN, Casper 
KWYO, Sheridan 
KPOW, Powell 

MONTANA 

KBMY, Billings 
KRJF, Miles City 
KMON, Great Falls 
KOPR, Butte 

NEVADA 

KRAM, Las Vegas 



THE 



INTERMOUNTAIN 
NETWORK Inc. 




> Inc. National Representatives 



New York 



Chicago 



Los AngaUt 



San Francisco 



Atlanta 



I AUGUST 1949 



VOL 3 



ho.n 



kUGUS^ 



A9A9 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52 

OUTLOOK 

MR. SPONSOR: ROBERT J. PIGGOTT 

NEW AND RENEW 

P.S. 

RADIO AUDIENCE: 1949 

CHICAGO LAUNDRY STORY 

THE DEALER CO-OP $ 

HOW DOES YOUR PUBLICITY GO? 

FALTERING FARM COMMERCIAL 

HOW TO SAMPLE A VACATION 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

4-NETWORK TV COMPARAGRAPH 

THE TV STATION BREAK 

TV TRENDS 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 



1 
4 
10 
12 
17 
19 
21 
24 
26 
28 
30 
32 
36 
43 
48 
50 
60 
62 
62 




Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Executive. Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 
Street. New York in. N. Y. Telephone: Plaza S-1? 1 " 
Chicago Office: Mltfi X. Michigan Avenue. Telephone: Fi- 
nancial 155r.. Publication Offices: 3110 Elm. Baltimore 11. 
Md. Subscriptions: tinted states $8 a year. Canada and 
foreign $'.<. Single copies ,50c. Printed in U. S. A. Copy- 
right 1949 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

President and Publisher: Norman It. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Blaine Couper Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. 
Koehler. Associate Editors: Frank Itannister. Charles 
Simian. Dan Rlchman. Editorial Department: Stella 
Brauner, Joseph Gould. Art Director: Howard Wechsler. 
Advertising Directoi Lester .1. Blumenthal. Advertising 
Department: M. II. LeBlang. Beatrice Turner; Chicago 
Vlanagei Jerrj Glynn, Jr. circulation Manager: Milton 
Kaye Circulation Department Mania chinitz. Etnily 
cutillo. Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman. 

COVEB PICTURE: The transcribed '■Cisco Kid" is 
iusl one ol the hundreds of ways broadcasting is con- 
stantly celling the outdoors, vacations, and travel. 



JO West 52nd 



"LET'S SELL OPTIMISM" 

On pages 40 and 41 of the 4 July 
issue of your fine magazine, we read 
with interest your "Open Letter to Bill 
Rine. WWVA." 

We are in hearty accord with the 
idea of a series of announcements 
beamed at business men and consum- 
ers in regard to the "Let's sell op- 
timism" idea. 

We feel strongly that half of our 
present trouble is due to fear, and 
wish to do our part to dispel it. 

Thomas M. Colton 
Commercial Manager 
WARE, Ware. Mass. 



WMIQ. Iron Mountain. Michigan, 
plans to extensively promote "Lets 
sell optimism." 

We think the idea is terrific! 
M. R. Baldrica 
Program Director 
WMIQ, Iron Mountain, Mich. 



Your recent "Let's sell optimism"' 
article and open letter hit us squarely 
where we need hitting. 

May I suggest that your office act 
as a trading post for announcements 
on this subject so that all interested 
stations may do the most effective job. 
We would appreciate receiving the 
U. S. statistics to help us write our 
announcements, and. of course. I will 
send you copies of announcements. 

Thank you for promoting an idea 
which should not only help our busi- 
ness, but also our community and 
nation. 

Stephen W. Ryder 
Station Manager 
WENE and WENE-FM 
Endicott, N. Y. 



In glancing through the 4 July issue 
of sponsor, I noticed the open letter to 
Bill Rine. WWVA. on selling optimism. 
I think it is a very good idea, and 
would like to have the U. S. Statistics 
you mentioned at the end of the letter. 
William P. White 
General Manager 
KPJB. Marshalltoun. la. 
(Please turn to page 6 1 




IN BMB 



IN HOOPER 



FIRST 




IN THE SOUTHS 
FIRST MARKET 



To sell Houston 
and the great 
Gulf Coast area 



Buy KPRC 

FIRST 

in Everything 
that Counts 




HOUSTON 

950 KILOCYCLES -5000 WATT! 

NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

Jack Harris, General Manager 

Represented Nationally by Edward Petry & Co 



IS THERE 
A DOCTOR IN 
THE HOUSE? 



We mean a "Specialist," not a general practitioner. Radio and 
Television are highly competitive media. And since they began 

to vie for the advertising dollar, there has been an urgent need for 

"specialized" representation of each. 

On the proven theory that one man cannot efficiently serve two 
masters, Blair-TV, Inc. was born. 

We are specialists . . . TV sales specialists devoting 100 percent 
of our energy and talents to the sale of television time and programs. 

Blair-TV, Inc. has developed its own sales technique which will 
mean more dollars for TV Station owners. 

May we tell you about the Blair- TV '^Ten-point Sales Pla?i? " 
Write Blair-TV, Inc., 22 East 40th Street, New York 16, N. Y. 




BLAIR IV INC 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF 
LEADING TELEVISION STATIONS 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ST. LOUIS • DITROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



1 




Example 

#16 



r 



WE QUOTE WITH PRIDE— 
"This is the first year that we 
have been able to meet the de- 
mands of all the farmers who 
called on us. Approximately 
1,600 persons reported for work 
who had heard the announce- 
ment on WIP." 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE 

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE— 

United States Employment 

Service 




WIP 

Philadelphia 
Basic Mutual 



Represented Nationally 



KIIW Aim PETRY <& CO 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

We are heartily in favor of your 
'Let's sell optimism" campaign. 
Tom Maxwell 
Managing Director 
WIBB, Macon, Ga. 



We are very much interested in 
your "Let's sell optimism" campaign, 
and would like to join you in the 
project. 

Jeanne Terry (Mrs.) 
WTTH and WTTH-FM 
Port Huron, Mich. 



We here at KMCM are definitely in- 
terested in an aggressive "Let's sell 
optimism" campaign, and honestly be- 
lieve that any station that gets behind 
such a campaign will achieve results. 

Lou Gillette 

Manager 

KMCM, McMinnville, Ore. 



We, here at WBBC, feel that the 
"Sell optimism" campaign is as great 
a thing as has come along in a long 
while. 

L. George Geiger 
Production-Promotion 
WBBC, Flint, Mich 



The staff here at WDZ is very much 
interested in your "Let's sell optimism" 
idea. Your open letter in the last issue 
of SPONSOR coincided in thought with 
a campaign we have already begun. 

So send along those U. S. statistics. 
We'll use 'em. 

Eugene Dorsey 
Continuity Dept. 
WDZ, Tuscola, III. 




I read your open letter to Bill Rine, 
of WWVA, on vour optimism cam- 
paign with a great deal of interest. 
Please include WLAN. in Lancaster, as 
one of the participants in your cam- 
paign. 

We all hear a great deal of pessimis- 
tic talk around us these days — we hear 
it from our neighbors, from our asso- 
ciates, and from many of our news 
commentators. We also read a great 



SPONSOR 



deal about it daily in our newspapers. 
We hear so much about the coming 
depression or recession, and have been 
warned so much about it that we ex- 
pect it to come any day now. You 
know you can talk yourself into almost 
anything, and most of us have already 
been talked into a coming depression — 
right or wrong. 

I think radio has a great oppor- 
tunity to spread optimism, and WLAN 
is going to try to do it here in Lancas- 
ter. We will try to erase some pessimis- 
tic talk and economic jitters in our 
territory. Yes, WLAN is going to try 
to get people back to the bright side 
and the optimistic side of thinking. 

Congratulations on your campaign 
— count us in and please send us any 
further information for our use, here 
on WLAN. 

John D. Hymes 
Assistant Manager 
WLAN, Lancaster, Pa. 



Noted your "Let's sell optimism" 
spread with great interest. I have re- 
ferred several other station managers 
to the 4 July issue of sponsor. 

I would like to put on a concerted 
campaign along the lines you set forth. 
Frank M. Devaney 
General Manager 
WMIN, St. Paul, Minn. 



Your "Let's sell optimism'' appeals 
to us, too. 

Thanks for the tip-off on a nice 
idea. 

J. A. Black 
Program Manager 
WGH, Norfolk, Va. 



We here at WREN are mighty en- 
thusiastic about your excellent "Let's 
sell optimism" campaign. Our big guns 
are aimed and ready to fire, once we 
have the ammunition necessary. Be 
assured that we're 100% in this very 
worthwhile venture. 

W. P. Yearout, Jr. 
Promotion Manager 
WREN, Topeka, Kan. 



Your "Let's sell optimism" idea is 
an excellent one. 

Worth Kramer 
Assistant General Manager 
WJR, Detroit 




Casting or Castigating, He Never Lets 
The Big Ones Get Away 

It may be all quiet along the Patuxent during peaceful 
fishing hours . . but when his "top of the news from 
Washington" broadcast rolls around in early evening 
the situation changes. Never one to be misled by a 
tranquil surface, he drops his inquiring line into hidden 
depths — and reels in many an interesting catch. 

As one of the networks' best known news commentators 
he casts a nightly spell on some 13,500,000 weekly listen- 
ers. Even his severest critics acknowledge both his 
influence and his contributions to national welfare via 
his exposes of abuses. 

His broadcast — the Fulton Lewis, Jr. program — is cur- 
rently sponsored on more than 300 stations. As the 
original "news co-op" it offers local advertisers network 
prestige at local time cost, with pro-rated talent cost. 

Since there are more than 500 MBS stations, there may 
be an opening in your city. If you want a ready-made 
audience for a client or yourself, investigate now. 
Check your local Mutual outlet — or the Co-operative 
Program Department, Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, NYC 18 (or Tribune Tower, Chicago 11) . 



I AUGUST 1949 



v 



•Sji 




SI, 



overwhelming. . . 



(but not surprising) 

Throughout Intermountain America . . . 

KSL is the listeners' choice by more 
than 3 to 1 ! 

KSL captures the biggest audience in 68. 1 % 
of the total 532 weekly quarter-hours! 

KSL wins more than twice as many "firsts" 
as all other Salt Lake City Stations and 
Regional Networks combined! 



That's the gist of the most far-reaching and 
complete study ever made in KSL's 74-county 
unit BMB Audience Area. 

Conducted by Benson & Benson, Inc., independent 
research organization, this new Listener Diary 
presents sterling-silver proof that KSL is ahead 
by an overwhelming majority in a market where a 
million of your customers spend one billion 
dollars a year in retail sales. 

If you want to stay way ahead of your competition 
in Intermountain America, call us or Radio 
Sales. And discover how 50,000-watt KSL 
gets you more customers at less cost per 
customer than any other station 
or regional network. 



KSL 



50,000 WATTS - CBS 
SALT LAKE CITY 



Forecasts of things to come, as 
seen by sponsor's editors 



Outlook 



N. Y. City building nearly 100% ahead 
of first four months in 1948 

Building in New York City first four months of 1949 
was almost 100% ahead of construction during the same 
period of 1948, $201,000,000 against $103,000,000. For 
all of New York State the comparison for the first three 
months showed 1949 with $279,000,000 as against 1948's 
total for the first quarter of $183,000,000. Little of this 
good news has found its way onto the air or to newspapers. 



Inventories down in May as manufacture-to- 
retailer movement continues at April level 

Inventory report for May by the Department of Com- 
merce's Office of Business Economics is further proof of 
the healthy state of business in the U. S. Allowing for 
seasonal fluctuations, which accounted for 25% of the 
decline, U. S. retail inventories for May were off $300.- 
000.000. Total inventories, wholesale, retail, and manu- 
facturing, totaled $52,538,000,000, off $1,200,000,000 from 
April. Normal flow of goods from manufacturer to retailer 
for the month indicates that May sales were better than 
April and that retailers are playing it very close to the 
chest. Local retail broadcast advertising for May was up. 

■ 

New England sees light 
on the business horizon 

New England, first section of the U. S. to feel business 
curtailment, is frequently the first section of the nation to 
see openings in the clouds. Rhode Island, currently with 
22.7% of its "insured" workers unemployed as against 
a national average of 9.7%, has topped the "recession" 
states and is only now reversing its unemployment trend. 
Woolens, shoes, rayons, typewriters, hardware, and appli- 
ances are on the upbeat. Cottons still have not turned the 
corner. Big ache of New England is that it has too many 
non-advertised products which must follow the trend, and 
which feel the effect of buying curtailment first. 

Steel union estimate of pension 
costs drops 50% 

The United Steelworkers (CIO) has cut down the estimate 
of its pension-plan cost to a little under 11 cents, whereas 
a year ago the estimate was 23 cents. It will use labor 
stations and union programs on the air to explain how it 
has figured the over-50% cut in pension costs to the steel 
industry. 

Britain wants U. S. capital investment 
more than ECA dollars 

British current hope is not for more ECA U. S. money 
but for American capital investment in business on the 
tight little isle and in its colonies. Since profits can't be 
taken out of Britain or its colonies, the approach has to 
contain considerable double talk and some tricks on how 
to make money without being on a dollar basis. It's the 
latter that's appealing to some U. S. investors who will be 
spending U. S. money in U. S. to help British industry in 
Britain. Most of it will go for sorely-needed advertising. 



U. S. Department of Commerce 
goes into fact-finding business 

In order to stop manufacturers from competing with re- 
tailers, Senator Bill Langer has introduced a bill which 
forbids tire manufacturers to operate retail stores. If 
the Langer bill passes, any one who manufacturers a prod- 
uct, from bread to automobiles, can be a lawbreaker if he 
builds a business to sell his product to consumer. The 
possibilities are fantastic but that's what Senate Bill S-640 
is out to accomplish to help the little retailer. Ouch! 

ClO's Nathan says pay more wages, 
stop recession becoming depression 

CIO's Robert Nathan report, which is supposed to prove 
that most business can afford a fourth round of wage in- 
creases, isn't quite the shock that his 1947 report was. 
Nathan doesn't claim that all business can afford the 
fourth round but does pitch the idea that business should 
dip into "liquid" reserves to give raises to help battle the 
recession. Nathan's explanation is that the reserves should 
be used to stop a depression, not to pull the corporations 
out of one. It sounds good. 

Nylon the coming fabric for 
most women's ready to wear 

Nylon is the coming fabric. While it's highpriced in com- 
parison with cotton, rayon, and even silk, it's non-wrinkle 
attributes and the fact that it "hangs out," is endearing 
it to women all over the U. S. Although fabric houses 
haven't used broadcast advertising to any great extent, a 
number of firms will use TV to demonstrate the livability 
of nylon fabrics. 

Non-food items return real 
profits for giant markets 

Recent survey of profits from non-grocery items in chain 
stores and supermarkets reveals that more money is being 
made in stores from kitchen accessories than from eatables. 
Future giant markets will be self-service department stores 
and give real competition to regular department stores. 
Giant markets can sell many standard items cheaper be- 
cause of lower service costs. Storecasting. which is heard 
on the air and in the stores, helps sell many products that 
in the past could not be moved in self-service emporiums. 

Rush on FAX seen as 

U.S. effort to fight recession 

Fact that TV alone can't battle cutback in consumer buy- 
ing will inspire FCC to action on FAX broadcasting. Action 
is to be expected before 1 January 1950. 



SPONSOR 




FARM SERVICE 



\ -_ 



. . • Trained ^> 

Agricultural Editors: 



Farm Bulletin Board (daily) • Farm World Today (daily) • Dinner 

Bell Time (daily) • This Farming Business (daily) • Prairie 

Farmer Air Edition (daily) • Daily specialist from Board 

of Trade (grain markets) • Remote broadcasts direct from 

Union Stock Yards (twice daily) • Weather reports 

direct from U. S. Government Weather Bureau 

• Temperature and humidity every 

~ station break • Such special features 

'--.. "-^! as "Your Land and My Land" "Visits 

c " ;: ":~^ , - with Med Maxwell" "Great Stories 

-<-^^- About Corn;* 



N./>>. 



Arthur C. Page 
Larry McDonald 
Al Tiffany 
Lloyd Burlingham 
Bill Morrissey 



Paul Johnson 
Ralph Yohe 
Bill Renshaw 
Gladys Skelley 
Frank Bisson 



Dave Swanson 




• • • IMPORTANT AGRICULTURAL GUEST SPEAKERS AND INTERVIEWS 

• . . REMOTE BROADCASTS FROM AGRICULTURAL EVENTS 



CwltfC'$'6' More reasons why farm folks all over Illinois, Indiana, 
Michigan and Wisconsin listen more to WLS... 
and to our advertisers. For details, write Sales Manager, 
WLS, Chicago 7, or see a John Blair man. 



t^S^dg^^ 




CHICAGO 7 






890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE. 
REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY. 



I AUGUST 1949 



II 



For Profitable 
Selling 



WDEL 

WILMINGTON 

DELAWA R E 

WEST 

EASTON 

'ENNSYLVANI 



WKBO 

HARRISBURG 

PENN SYLVANI A 



WORK 

YORK 

PENNSYLVANIA, 



WRAW 

READING 

EN N SYLVAN 



WGAL 

LANCASTER 

PENNSYLVANIA 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director ^S; 




Represented by 

ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 

Los Angeles New York 

San Francisco Chicago 



STEINMAN STATIONS 




>/r. Sponsor 



Robert •/. Piggott 

Advertising Manager 
The Grove Laboratories, Inc., St. Louis 



Unlike many closely-held, family-owned corporations, the term 
"conservative" doesn't exactly fit The Grove Laboratories, Inc. 
Neither does it fit youngish (under 40) Bob Piggott, whose job is 
to see that the frequency and concentration of Groves selective 
advertising delivers the right kind of circulation at the lowest cost. 
"Aggressive, but sound" is the way the Grove executive group regards 
its operation. The company has made money over the years and 
progressively increased its tangible net worth, which reached in 
1948 over $2,750,000. 

With Grove's recent acquisition of the F. W. Fitch Co.. Des Moines, 
la., Piggott's responsibilities are greatly enlarged. In addition to 
his selective operation he now has under his wing The Shadow. 
Mutual network show covering the country for Fitch, except in the 
Blue Coal area ( a dozen states on the Eastern seaboard ) . Piggott 
will keep a sharp eye on the network program, just as he has on 
Grove's selective campaigns. Some ad-managers get the most from 
their programs by meticulous attention to detail. Other executives 
know what they want and how they want it. but put the responsibility 
of getting it done up to specialists on their staffs or at their agencies. 
That's Piggott's way and Groves agency I Harry r B. Cohen Adver- 
tising, New York) likes it that way. 

Grove philosophy^ abhors the static in operation as well as in in- 
dividual thinking. The only real setback ever reported was in 1946 
when the company suffered a net loss attributed to writing off obsolete 
and discontinued lines, while actually earning a net profit from opera- 
tions. During the three years Piggott has directed Grove advertising, 
the firm's vigorous selective campaigns have sparked a strong demand 
for all its products. 

When Grove combed the field for an ad-manager to fit their exact- 
ing specifications, they let it be known they were interested in a man 
to whom agency problems, including media buying and research, 
were no mystery. Hill Blackett Co. (Chicago). BBD&O I Chicago l. 
Needham. Louis and Brorby I Chicago ( had contributed account, 
media, and research experience to a young executive named Bob 
Piggott. 



12 



SPONSOR 







Unusual city, Duluth. Not the country's largest market, but one of the best for 
business. That's because Duluth is a stable market. It's populated essentially by mid- 
dle elass folks, whose Spend Ability isn't affected too much by the vagaries of condi- 
tions elsewhere in the nation. 

The man next door may work in the steel mills, or on the railroad, or on the 
coal docks. Or he may be a white-collar executive. But he's the man next door. He 
lives in much the same kind of house, lives much the same kind of life, does much 
the same kind of spending. Be sure Duluih is on the list for your next campaign. 



WEBC * DULUTH-SUPERIOR * KDAL 



NBC 



MINNESOTA 



WISCONSIN 



CBS 



I AUGUST 1949 



!3 



Ever try 
home-grown talent? 




It scared a Cincinnati greeting card manufacturer.* 
He thought buying a local live talent show 
in a far-off market— Boston— was like putting his head 
in a lion's mouth... too risky. 

Until Radio Sales showed him it wasn't a gamble at all. 

A Radio Sales Account Executive played him 

an audition record of "Uncle Elmer's Song Circle" on 

WEEI. Pointed out the natural tie-in 

between his sales story and the show. Furnished him 

with proof of its pulling power. The pay off . . . 

The manufacturer bought this WEEI local 
live talent program. And his New England sales hit 
an all-time high ! That was four years ago. He's still 
on — because sales are still climbing. 

No wonder national spot advertisers now sponsor 
more than 750 local live talent broadcasts each week 
on the stations represented by Radio Sales. Their 
sales curves prove that you can get a sales-effective 
performance with local live talent supplied by 
Radio Sales. Without a bit of a risk. 

*A real life story 

RADIO SALES 

Radio and Television Stations Representative .. .CBS 

Radio Sales represents the best radio station — the CBS one of course- 
in Boston, New York*, Washington, D. C, Philadelphia*, Richmond, the 
Carolinas*, Alabama*. St. Louis, Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Salt 
Lake City*, Los Angeles*, San Francisco, and the West Coast's leading 
regional network. (*And the best TV station in these markets.) 



KFH IS TOPS 




N o tie J o o k 



The only established Women's Show pro- 
duced in Wichita is E. J.'s Notebook on 
KFH. The program features items of 
interest to women with participating 
announcements for advertisers who want 
to reach a TOP audience of women. 



E. J.'s Notebook has been aired regularly for a decade. 
The show has a natural animation, skillful script and 
a delightful personality that clicks. Ethel Jane King, 
KFH Women's Editor, is currently emcee for the 
show and she has sold everything from soap flakes 
to diamond bracelets on the air. Program content 
includes sparkling interviews with celebrities, per- 
sonalized comments on styles and trends of the day 
and announcements of meetings, clubs and concerts 
of fascinating interest to her loyal audience. Call your 
Petry representative today for availabilities. 



For evidence of TOP programing on KFH, see any Petry man. 



5000 Watts - ALL the time 



KFH; 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRT & CO., INC. 



WICHITA, KANSAS 



16 



SPONSOR 



/ AUGUST 1949 




New 



renew 



THESE REPORIS APPEAR IN ALTLRNATE ISSUES 



*m mc 



New on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Adam Hat Stores Inc 
American Tobacco Co 

Block Drug Co 
Bruner-Ritter Inc 
Grove Laboratories Inc 
Pillsbury Mills Inc 
Ralston Purina Co 

Serutan Co 

Southern Baptist Convention 

Wilson Sporting Goods Co 



Weintraub 


ABC 


260 


Gumbinner 


CBS 


172 


BBD&O 


NBC 


163 


Cecil & Presbrey 


CBS 


149 


Raymond Spector 


ABC 


187 


Harry Cohen 


MBS 




Leo Burnett 


ABC 


216 


Brown & Bawers 


MBS 




Roy S. Durstine 


ABC 


57 


Liller, Neal & Battle 


ABC 


130 


Ewell-Thurber 


MBS 





Drew Pearson; Sun 6-6:15 pm; Sep 4; 52 wks 
Leave It to Joan; Fri 9-9:30 pm; Sep 9; 52 wks 
Light-Up Time; MTWTF 7-7:15 pm; Sep 5; 52 wks 
Burns & Allen; Wed 10-10:30 pm; Sep 21; 52 wks 
Unannounced; Sun 9:30-10 pm; Sep 4; 52 wks 
The Shadow; Sun 5-5:30 pm; Sep 11; 39 wks 
House Party; MTWTF 12-12:30 pm; Sep 19; 52 wks 
Checkerboard Jamboree; MTWTF 12:15-12:30 pm; 

26; 52 wks 
Victor Lindlahr; MWF 10:45-11 pm; Sep 5; 52 wks 
Baptist Hour; Sun 3:35-4 pm; Oct 2; 52 wks 
All-Star Football Game; Fri Aug 12 9:30 pm to 

conclusion 



W 



m By 



Renewals on Networks 



t 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



: ; 



Emerson Drug Co 


BBD&O 


CBS 


155 


Goldseal Co 


Campbell-Mithum 


CBS 


170 


Lutheran Layman's League 


Gotham 


MBS 




Sterling Drug Inc 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


CBS 


150 






CBS 


150 






ABC . 


204 



Inner Sanctum; Mon 8-8:30 pm; Jul 25; 52 wks 
Arthur Godfrey Show; MTWTF 10:30-10:45 am; Aug 

29; 52 wks 
Lutheran Hour: Sun 12:30-1 pm; Sep 25; 52 wks 
Mystery Theatre; Tu 8-8:30 pm; Aug 3; 52 wks 
Mr. Cameleon; Wed 8-8:30 pm; Jul 3; 52 wks 
My True Story; Tu & Th 10-10:15 am; Jun 7; 57 wks 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



Robert N. Baggs 

James A. Barnett 
Alberta Boutyette 
James C. Carmine 
George H. Davis 

John F. Des Reis 

Burton Durkee 
Gerhard Exo 

Wallace N. Guthrie 
Grace Johnson 
G. R. Jones 

Thomas H. Keating 

W. L. Kesinger 

William McCarthy 
John M. McKibbin 

Marjorie Shields 
Albert R. Stevens 

Victor P. Strite 

Lafayette A. Tremblay 
Eugene N. West 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Lever Bros Co, Chi., vp, gen mgr 

Bonwit Teller Inc, N. Y., art dir 

Philco Corp, Phila., vp 

Rexall Drug Co, L. A., mgr packaged medicine 

dept 
Ronson Art Metal Works Inc, Newark N. J., sis 

mgr export dept 



Day, Duke & Tarleton, N. Y., mdsg dir, acct 
exec 



General Motors Corp (Chevrolet Motor div), 

gen sis mgr 
Chrysler Corp (Dodge div), Detroit, truck adv, 

prom 
Brooks Brothers, N. Y., adv mgr 



National Dairy Products Corp, N. Y., adv, sis 

prom dir 
American Safety Razor Corp, N. Y., gen sis 

mgr 
Melville Shoe Corp, N. Y., sis mgr 
U. S. Time Corp, N. Y., sis mgr 



RCA Service Co Inc, Camden N. J., consumer prods service 

sis mgr 
Same, vp in chge adv 
Same, adv dir 
Same, exec vp 
Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Kaiser-Fraser Corp, Willow Run Mich, adv dir 

General Foods Corp (Diamond Crystal Salt div), N. Y.. adv. 

sis prom mgr 
Shick Inc, Stamford Conn., exec vp, gen mgr 
Helena Rubinstein Inc, N. Y., adv mgr 
General Motors Corp (Oldsmobile div), Lansing Mich., gen 

sis mgr 
Same, gen mgr 

Same, truck adv mgr 

Bonwit Teller Inc, N. Y., adv mgr 

Westinghouse Electric Corp, Pittsb., vp. gen mgr con- 
sumer prods 
Sunset Appliance Stores Inc, N. Y., adv, prom dir 
American Tobacco Co, N. Y., adv mgr 

Same, vp, sis dir 

Same, gen mgr 

Lehn & Fink Products Corp, N. Y., gen sis mgr 



• In next issue: New and Renewed on Networks. Sponsor Personnel Changes, 
National Broadcast Sales Executive Changes. New Agency Appointments 



m 

mm 

■ 



M 



■ 






•■' 



mm 



National Broadcast Sales Executives (Personnel changes) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Robert I. Foreman 
U. A. Latham 
Hartley L. Samuels 
Guy Wadsworth 
I .t-slif P. Ware 



VVLDY, Ladysmith Wis., slsman 
WKRC, Cinci., gen sis mgr 
Lancer Productions, N. Y. 
WONE, Dayton, O., sis staff 
KXLW, Clayton Mo., exec dir 



Same, sis mgr 

WKRC-TV, Cinci., gen sis mgr 

WFDR, N. Y., sis dir 

WLWD (TV), Dayton O., »ls dir 

Same, sis dir 



New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



W 



m 



American Home Foods Inc. N. Y. 

Associated Iron & Metal Co, Oakland Calif. 

Astor Theatre, N. Y. 

Bankers Life & Casualty Co, Chi. 

Barton's Bonbonniere Inc, N. Y. 

H. R. Basford Co, S. F. 

Big Bear Land & Water Co, L. A. 

Block Drug Co, Jersey City N. J. 

Burdett College, Boston 

Cal-Dak Co, Colton Calif. 

Capehart-Farnsworth Corp, Ft. Wayne Ind. 

Carter Products Inc, N. Y. 

Charles of the Ritz, N. Y. 

Dean Milk Co, Chi. 

Eastern Koolvent Aluminum Awning Inc, N. Y. 

Federal Life & Casualty Co, N. Y. 

Fidelity Roof Co, Oakland Calif. 

E. Fougera Inc, N. Y. 

G & W Refrigeration Co, Oakland Calif. 

Gordon Baking Co, Detroit 

Grove Laboratories, N. Y. 

House of Old Molineaux Inc, Boston 

Idaho Prune Advertising Commission, Boise Idaho 

International Salt Co, N. Y. 

John F. Jelke Co, Chi. 

Klever Kook Food Co, Santa Ana Calif. 

R. Kolodney Co, Hartford Conn. 

Laurel Raceways Meet, Laurel Md. 

Frank H. Lee Co, N. Y. 

Lever Bros Ltd, Toronto Canada 

Marcus Breier Sons Inc, N. Y. 

Marlin Firearms, New Haven Conn 

Mason Chicks Inc, So. Plainfield N. J. 

Mead Johnson & Co, Evansville Ind. 

Nu-Ena-tiel Co, Chi. 

Parkview Markets Inc, Cinci. 

P. H. Postel Milling Co, Mascoutah 111. 

Prepared Products Co Inc, Pasadena Calif. 

Quality Television Corp, L. A. 

Re-Clean Inc, N. Y. 

Resolute Paper Products Corp, N. Y. 

Helena Rubinstein Inc, N. Y. 

Ruby Chevrolet, Chi. 

Schiff, Terhune & Co, N. Y. 

Sherwin-Williams Co, Cleve. 

Sportstamp Publishers, Phila. 

Standard Laundry Co, Jersey City, N. J. 

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp, N. Y. 

United Wallpaper Co, Chi. 

Washington State Advertising Commission 

Whitehall Pharmacal Co, N. Y. 



Wimbledon Shirt Co, Chi. 
Winarick Inc, N. Y. 
Worthington Products Inc, 



N. Y. 



George Washington prods 

Bldg. supplies 

Movies 

Insurance 

Candies 

Electrical supplies distributor 

Peter Pan Rancho Club lots 

Stera-Klcen Denture Cleanser 

College 

Clothes baskets, trays, tray stand mfr 

Radios, TV sets 

PerStop liquid deodorant 

Cosmetics 

Chocolate Milk 

Awnings, lawn umbrellas 

Insurance 

Bldg. supplies 

Cal-Rinex for hay fever 

Ice Making Machines 

Baked goods 

Pfunder's Antacid Tablets 

Wines 

Institutional 

Sterling Salt 

Jelke's Good Luck Margarine 

Flavored flour 

Betty Hartford dresses 

Racetrack 

Men's hats 

Lipton tea, noodle soup 

Bantamac all-weather jackets 

Razor blades 

Hatchery 

Pablum, baby foods 

Paints 

Food prods 

Elegant feeds, flour 

Dixie Fry seasoned flour 

Bob Hope TV enterprise 

Home dry cleaner 

"Sure," toilet tissue 

Cosmetics 

Automobiles 

Insurance 

Weed-No-More, Pestroy DDT, Bug 

Blaster Garden Dust 
Publisher 
Laundry 

Films, Roxy Theatre 
Wallpaper 
Tourist accounts 
Anacin 

Anacin, Kolynos, Bisodol 

Guards Cold Tablets 

Shirts 

Jeris Hair Tonic, Hair Oil, Herpicide 

Sleep-Eezc, sleeping pills 



Ted Bates, N. Y. 

Ad Fried, Oakland Calif. 

Donahue & Coe, N. Y. 

Weiss & Geller, Chi. 

United, N. Y. 

Beaumont & Hohman, S. F. 

Raymond Keane, L. A. 

Redfield-Johnstonc, N. Y. 

L. Richard Guylay, N. Y. 

Jordan, L. A. 

J. M. Mathes, N. Y. 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N. Y. 

Peck, N. Y. 

Morris F. Swaney, Chi. 

Morey, Humm & Johnstone, N. Y. 

William Warren, N. Y. 

Ad Fried, Oakland Calif. 

Redfield-Johnstone, N. Y. 

Ad Fried, Oakland Calif. 

N. W. Ayer, Phila. 

Harry B. Cohen, N. Y. 

Morris F. Swaney, Chi. 

Pacific National, Seattle Wash. 

Duane Jones, N. Y. 

Tatham-Laird, Chi. 

Lockwood-Shackelford, L. A. 

Lawrence Esmond, N. Y. 

Kal, Ehrlich & Merrick, Wash. 

Grey, N. Y. 

Young & Rubicam, N. Y., for Canadian adv 

Chernow, N. Y. 

Duane Jones, N. Y. 

Metropolitan, N. Y. 

C. J. LaRoche, N. Y. 

Mitchell-Faust, Chi. 

Keelor & Stites, Cinci. 

Warner, Schulenburg, Todd, St. L. 

Dan B. Miner, L. A. 

Buchanan, L. A. 

Cayton, N. Y. 

Lester Harrison, N. Y. 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mathes, N. Y. 

W. B. Doner, Chi. 

E. M. Freystadt, N. Y. 

Griswold-Eshleman, Cleve. 

Weightman, Phila. 

Ray-Hirsch, N. Y. 

Charles Schlaifer, N. Y. 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi. 

MacWilkins, Cole & Weber, Seattle 

Duane Jones, N. Y., for special radio 

campaigns 
Benton & Bowles, N. Y., for "Armchair 

Detective" TV show 
Biow, N. Y. 
Louis A. Smith, Chi. 

Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford, N. Y. 
William von Zehle, N. Y. 



» 



IVew developments on SJ*0\SOMl stories 



p.s. 



See: "Radio sells a watch band" 

IsSlie: 28 February 1949. p. 27 

Subject! Speidel expands radio, enters television. 
Bruner-Ritter drops magazines for radio. 



Speidel tried radio for the first time in May last year to sell its watch 
bands when it started sponsoring a 15-minute segment of ABC's now 
famous quiz-giveaway, Stop The Music. Now, having arced up from 
around sixth to first place, with about half the $20,000,000 wholesale 
replacement business, Speidel is settling down to an exciting fight to 
hold its supremacy via a new network show and a plunge into tele- 
vision. 

Duffy's Tavern on NBC this fall is expected to reach new prospects 
for the company's bands, while Ed Wynn's CBS-TV network show, 
also starting in the fall, will woo viewers to linger for a look at the 
Speidel jewelry display via models. 

Not to be left out of the running since Speidel began making 
people ask for "Speidel bands," Bruner-Ritter, Inc., New York, 
has abandoned consumer magazine advertising for a king-size splash 
into radio. They tossed overboard a reported $500,000 magazine and 
Sunday supplement color campaign, doubled that budget and bought 
(via newly-appointed Raymond Spector Co.. Inc., New York) an 
ABC sustainer, Go For The House. This show, a 30-minute, once-a- 
week program, started 31 July (9:30 e.d.t. I , and the sponsor comes 
in 4 September following the August buildup. Bruner-Ritter revamped 
the format and changed the title to Chance of a Lifetime (the chance 
is for studio and listening audience (187 stations! to win prizes 
valued at $500,000 ) . 

Time and talent will cost an estimated $750,000. with about 
$250,000 planned for trade and other promotion, possibly including 
television. Bruner-Rittter, which makes the Bretton line, claims to 
dominate sales to watch manufacturers, as Speidel now does the re- 
placement business. They expect radio to bring them a larger share 
of a growing market. 



|IS 



See: Crusading Pays Lee 
IsSUe: February 1947. p. 9 

Subject: Controversial Drew Pearson switches to 
Adam Hats; Lee signs Robert Montgomery 



Adam Hats, a chain that sells the Adam line through other outlets 
also, has appointed William H. Weintraub & Company, Inc.. New 
York, in the hope that that astute, hard-hitting agency can give 
Adam chapeaux the glamor that fights, straight news, and an unla- 
mented network amateur hour never quite achieved. Drew Pearson, 
controversial, crusading (". . . make democracy live") newsman, 
made Lee hats probably the most-asked-for brand in America. He's 
the other half of the team that Adam executives expect to give their 
line unquestioned leadership (it has ranked close to the top for a 
number of years) . 

Lee. meanwhile, turned its back on the agency and the commen- 
tator who never seemed to wind up one feud before finding himself in 
the middle of two more. Through Grey Advertising Agency, Inc., 
New York, Lee successfully negotiated for the services of motion 
picture star Robert Montgomery. Format will be easy and informal, 
featuring news and sidelights based partly on Montgomery's travels 
and close acquaintance with people, big and little, all over the world. 
Program will start in September, probably over ABC, though nego- 
tiations aren't vet final. 



Remember the 
story about . . . 



the bow 
and arrow 





that developed into 

the guns j^ 
of today? 




Many powerful things had 
insignificant beginnings. 
Take radio stations. WWDC 
in Washington started out 
small. And then it grew . . . 
and grew . . . until today 
it's one of the most power- 
ful forces for producing 
low-cost sales in this rich 
market. Call in your Forjoe 
man today. 



WWDC 

AM-FM— The D. C. Independent 

Represented Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



I AUGUST 1949 



19 



"Weed and Company serves you right!" I 

. . . said Mr. Jamison 







Weed 



a n 



a 



Mr. Z, a prominent figure in advertising circles, had 
been searching high and low for just the right set of local 
stations in which to test his new product. 

Finally (and wisely) he got Mr. Jamison, and Mr. Jamison 
got the availabilities. But by that time, advertiser Z was 
many miles at sea on his new yacht. And Mr. Jamison (who 
practically refuses to take a vacation) took off after him. 

"1 know it's summer and all that," said our man when he 
finally caught up with his client, who was much more pleased 
than surprised. "But I promised I'd let you see the list 
the moment it was ready. And besides, your test campaign 
really should start this month, you know." 

"Much obliged, my boy, much obliged!" said Mr. Z 
from his taffrail. 

"It was nothing, sir," Mr. Jamison replied. "Weed and 
Company serves you right!" 

An exaggerated example perhaps. But we've got a lot of 
people like Jamison at Weed and Company. . . and we're doing 
more business for all of our clients than ever before. 



radio and television 
station representatives 



new y o 



rk 



boston 



Chicago 



company 



san francisco 



a t 1 a n t a 



de troi 
hollywoo 



20 



SPONSOR 



*r 



JLJI M 



MODUUKflON w HWACrCUS 



I5JM3 #?» 



MKM0CAST W« 



M6ACVCUB 






^ HP svtnot 

AM Fl ^ 1 



iftW*» •**• 



s*s* *••* 



-£. 



*1l 

DESPITE GREATER NUMBER OF STATIONS AVAILABLE, TOP NETWORKS AND STATIONS HAVE BIGGER AUDIENCES THAN EVER 



II. S. Radio Audience: 1 




More people are listening niore hours 
to more sets in more homes than ever before 



^ 1 Radio constantly underes- 

iff.£-.v timates its strength. In the 
latest report of the size of the U. S. 
radio audience, the Broadcast Measure- 
ment Bureau takes for its percentage 
of the U. S. homes equipped with radio 
the same figure which was developed 
by Al Politz well over a year ago, 
94.2%. Normal expansion during the 
year is bound to have increased this 

I AUGUST 1949 



percentage. In 1946, the BMB per- 
centage of American homes with radio 
was 90.4. in two years, 1946-1948, 
there was an increase of 3.8%. There 
is little, if any, indication that this 
ratio of increase has slowed down in 
1948-1949. This is in part because 
radio ownership in the backward South- 
ern states continues to jump. While 
nationwide the increase in the 1946- 



1948 period was only 3.8%, the in- 
crease in the West South Central 
states, Kentucky, Louisiana, Oklahoma, 
and Texas was from 78.8% to 87.2%. 
In the East South Central states, Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee. Alabama, Missis- 
sippi, the increase was from 75% to 
85%. Radio ownership in these states is 
continuing to increase by leaps and 
bounds, but there is no current research 



21 



available to deliver definitive set-owner- 
ship figures, so 1948 figures are still 
being used. 

The minimum radio home figure for 
1949 is 39,275,000. This is 94.2 % of 
the total number of U. S. homes as 
estimated by Sales Management. In 
these homes, it's estimated by the Radio 
Manufacturers Association, there are 
over 80,000,000 radio receivers in cur- 
rent use. There are also a sizable num- 
ber of TV sets which are equipped to 
receive both AM and FM broadcasting. 
Estimates pla?e at 8.000.000 the num- 
ber of radio receivers which will be 



surveys. To these sets must be added 
an estimated half-million receivers in 
public places, most of which are lis- 
tened to by many more people than 
lend an ear to any individual home 
radio receiver during the average day. 

Every business day during the year, 
the radio audience is growing, simply 
because 98'/- of all new homes estab- 
lished by newly-married couples are 
radio equipped. This figure is a pro- 
jection of a survey* made three days 
in June at 11 license bureaus in the 
same number of cities in the U. S. 

Multiple set homes are constantly 



tra listening. Obviously, the number 
of listeners-per-listening-set is lower 
when the extra sets are in use, but there 
would be no listening at all at the time 
these sets are in use if there were no 
extra receivers in the home. Only 
Nielsen is continuously measuring the 
listening in these multiple set homes 
(new Audimeters are designed to meas- 
ure up to four receivers at one timej.f 
Out-of-home listening has not been 
measured. It is admittedly high during 
the summer and during all days on 
which important sports events are 
broadcast. It is also high all year 



l*€»reeiitaa*e of Itadio Homes in eaeh of the 4tt States of the I . S. A. 




sold in 1949. RMA feels that from 
one-third to 40% of these are replace- 
ment sets. The others represent new 
receivers for multiple set homes and 
new radio homes. The TV estimate of 
set sales for 1949 is 2,000.000. 

There are over 62.000.000 home ra- 
dio receivers in the 39.275,000 radio 
homes. The families in these homes 
also own. at a minimum. 10.037.900 
automobile radios and 1,791,500 port- 
able radio receivers, according to recent 



on the increase. At first blush, this 
would seem not important in judging 
the size of the radio audience. Never- 
theless, it is of vital importance. Multi- 
ple set homes listen 25% more than 
single set homes. An extra set in the 
kitchen means as much as one-and-a- 
half additional hours of daytime listen- 
ing. An extra set in the bedroom means 
at least a half hour a day of added 
listening. An extra set in junior's or sis- 
ter's room means at least an hour of ex- 



round in factories and public places 
where radios are in constant use. Lim- 
ited studies recentlv made by WITH 
(Baltimore). WRC (Washington!. 
WNEW (New York I. WHDH (Bos- 
ton) and NBC (youth market study) 
(Please turn to page 58) 



*Survey maile by a young folks "shelter 
magazine. 

tHooper does measure multiple set homes 
for his U. S. Hooperatings but this is only 
twice a year. 



22 



SPONSOR 



Radio Homes of America: Iff If) 



REGION 




TOTAL 






URBAN 




RURAL-NONFARM 


RURAL-FARM 


AREA 




% 


Radio 




% 


Radio 




% 


Radio 




% 


Radio 


STATE 


Families 


Radio 


Families 


Families 


Radio 


Families 


Families 


Radio 


Families 


Families 


Radio 


Families 


HE UNITED STATES 


41,692,900 


94.2 


39,281,230 


24,599,390 


95.5 


25,400,790 


8,621,690 
1,882,350 


94.5 
96.6 


8,144,670 
1,818,420 


6,471,820 
532,590 


88.6 
93.2 


5,735,770 


HE NORTHEAST 


11,028,100 


96.7 


10,668,810 


8,613,160 
1,993,320 


97.0 
98.9 


8,354,160 
1,972,380 


496,230 


NEW ENGLAND 


2,594,000 


98.2 


2,548,000 


465,780 


96.4 


449,150 


134,900 


93.8 


126,470 


MAINE 


251,000 


95.3 


239,320 


108,980 


98.2 


106,990 


101,760 


93.8 


95,450 


40,260 


91.6 


36,880 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


1 59,400 


96.7 


154,080 


94,730 


98.0 


92,850 


47,650 


95.0 


45,270 


17,020 


93.8 


15,960 


VERMONT 


101,900 


95.7 


97,550 


42,140 


98.4 


41,480 


34,660 


94.7 


32,820 


25,100 


92.6 


23,250 


MASSACHUSETTS 


1,294,700 


98.9 


1,280,650 


1,163,870 


99.1 


1.153,450 


106,290 


97.5 


103,630 


24,540 


96.0 


23,570 


RHODE ISLAND 


214,600 


98.8 


21 1,970 


195,500 


98.9 


193,430 


16,930 


97.2 


16,450 


2,170 


96.3 


2,090 


CONNECTICUT 


572,400 


98.6 


564,430 


388,100 


99.0 


384,180 


158,490 


98.1 


155,530 


25,810 


95.8 


24,720 


MIDDLE ATLANTIC 


8,434,100 


96.3 


8,120,810 


6,619,840 


96.4 


6,381,780 


1,416,570 


96.7 


1.369,270 


397,690 


93.0 


369,760 


NEW YORK 


4,205,700 


96.8 


4,069,840 


3,51 1,330 


96.8 


3,400,180 


522,320 


97.3 


507,990 


172,050 


94.0 


161,670 


NEW JERSEY 


1,329,900 


96.5 


1,283,770 


1,078,880 


96.4 


1,039,790 


218,440 


97.4 


212,840 


32,580 


95.6 


31,140 


PENNSYLVANIA 


2,898,500 


95.5 


2,767,200 


2,029,630 


95.7 


1,941,810 


675,810 


96.0 


648,440 


193,060 


91.7 


176,950 


HE NORTH CENTRAL 


12,882,300 


97.0 


12,496,390 


8,160,020 


97.6 


7,968,150 


2,467,330 
1,632,830 


96.8 
97.2 


2,387,620 
1,587,480 


2,254,950 


94.9 


2,140.620 


EAST NORTH CENTRAL 


8,777,400 


97.5 


8,556,190 


5,992,800 


97.9 


5,868,510 


1.151,770 


95.5 


1,100,200 


OHIO 


2,31 1,300 


97.4 


2,251,560 


1,608,820 


97.8 


1,573,320 


439,270 


97.3 


427,250 


263,210 


95.4 


250,990 


INDIANA 


1,170,200 


96.5 


1,129,530 


690,760 


97.1 


670,860 


258,650 


96.5 


249,700 


220,790 


94.6 


208,970 


ILLINOIS 


2,584,700 


97.5 


2,519,830 


1,950,500 


97.9 


1,909,080 


377,720 


96.9 


366,050 


256,480 


95.4 


244,700 


MICHIGAN 


1,774,800 


98.1 


1,740,560 


1,177,920 


98.4 


1,159,410 


380,440 


97.9 


372,600 


2 1 6,440 


96.4 


208,550 


WISCONSIN 


936,400 


97.7 


914,710 


564,800 


98.4 


555,840 


176,750 


97.2 


171,880 


194,850 


96.0 


186,990 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL 


4,104,900 


96.0 


3,940,200 


2,167,220 


96.9 


2,099.640 


834,500 


95.9 


800,140 


1,103,180 


94.3 


1 .040.420 


MINNESOTA 


829,300 


97.7 


810,010 


484,000 


98.2 


475,210 


148,540 


97.8 


145,310 


196,760 


96.3 


189,490 


IOWA 


780,100 


97.1 


757,340 


389,190 


97.3 


378,850 


161,850 


96.8 


156,720 


229,060 


96.8 


221,770 


MISSOURI 


1,194,200 


94.4 


1,127,530 


718,250 


96.1 


689,970 


215,070 


94.1 


202,330 


260,880 


90.2 


235,230 


NORTH DAKOTA 


145,900 


97.0 


141,480 


46,500 


97.9 


45,510 


3 1 ,460 


96.3 


30,300 


67,940 


96.7 


65,670 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


170,700 


95.9 


163,660 


55,1 10 


97.0 


53,430 


37,410 


95.4 


35,700 


78,180 


95.3 


74,530 


NEBRASKA 


384,200 


95.8 


368,180 


185,250 


96.9 


1 79,490 


84,610 


95.7 


80,950 


1 14,340 


94.2 


107,740 


KANSAS 


600,500 


95.3 


572,000 


288,920 


95.9 


277,180 


155,560 


95.7 


148,830 


156,020 


93.6 


145,990 


E SOUTH 


12,003,800 


87.3 


10,478,010 


6,090,920 


89.1 


5.424,100 


2,945,320 


89.9 


2,647,120 


2,967,560 


81.1 


2,406,790 


■ SOUTH ATLANTIC 


5,138,000 


88.5 


4,549,060 


2,603,350 


90.3 


2,350,190 


1 ,426,930 


90.8 


1,295,750 


1.107,720 


81.5 


903,120 


DELAWARE 


86,800 


95.4 


82,770 


46,930 


95.9 


45,020 


27,040 


96.7 


26,140 


12,830 


90.5 


1 1,610 


MARYLAND 


596,400 


95.7 


570,650 


368,160 


96.6 


355,770 


175,330 


95.6 


167,670 


52,910 


89.2 


47,210 


DIS. OF COLUMBIA 


238,800 


96.8 


231,160 


238,800 


96.8 


231,160 




















VIRGINIA 


770,300 


89.5 


689,070 


374,350 


92.2 


345,170 


206,450 


90.9 


187,660 


189,500 


82.4 


156,240 


WEST VIRGINIA 


473,300 


92.0 


435,430 


168,580 


94.7 


159,680 


194,550 


93.2 


181,310 


1 10,170 


85.7 


94,440 


NORTH CAROLINA 


898,500 


87.1 


782,830 


358,850 


88.4 


317,340 


241,320 


90.9 


219,390 


298,330 


82.5 


246,100 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


489,400 


83.2 


406,950 


180,910 


83.6 


151,160 


162,960 


88.1 


143,510 


145,530 


77.2 


1 12,280 


GEORGIA 


855,900 


83.4 


713,600 


403,230 


83.8 


337,960 


214,510 


88.1 


188,950 


238,160 


78.4 


186,690 


FLORIDA 


728,600 


87.4 


636,600. 


463,540 


87.8 


406,930 


204,770 


88.5 


181,120 


60,290 


80.5 


48,550 


Beast south central 


2,877,300 


85.0 


2,446,830 


1,187.820 


86.9 


1,032,170 


678,620 


89.2 


605,320 


1,010,860 


80.1 


809,340 


KENTUCKY 


734,400 


89.2 


655,190 


289,950 


92.7 


268,920 


192,830 


91.0 


175,430 


251,620 


83.8 


210,840 


TENNESSEE 


830,800 


87.0 


722,520 


370,450 


88.4 


327,320 


197,140 


90.4 


178,130 


263,210 


82.5 


217,070 


ALABAMA 


742,500 


82.7 


614,360 


333,120 


84.1 


280,150 


174,580 


87.6 


152,880 


234,800 


77.2 


181,330 


MISSISSIPPI 


569,600 


79.8 


454,760 


194,300 


80.2 


155,780 


1 14,070 


86.7 


98,880 


261,230 


76.6 


200,100 


■ //EST SOUTH CENTRAL 


3,988,500 


87.3 


3,482,120 


2,299,750 


88.8 


2,041,740 


839,770 


88.8 


746,050 


848,980 


81.8 


694,330 


ARKANSAS 


531,100 


83.9 


445,600 


186,940 


85.7 


160,260 


141,520 


87.0 


123,180 


202,640 


80.0 


162,160 


LOUISIANA 


700,400 


84.1 


588,750 


383,840 


86.0 


330,000 


172,500 


86.2 


148,760 


144,060 


76.4 


109,990 


OKLAHOMA 


673,300 


89.5 


602,930 


361,340 


91.5 


330,470 


152,420 


89.9 


137,070 


159,540 


84.9 


135,390 


1 TEXAS 


2,083,700 


88.5 


1,844,840 


1,367,630 


89.3 


1,221,010 


373,330 


90.3 


337,040 


342,740 


83.7 


286,790 


IE WEST 


5,778,700 


97.6 


5.638,020 


3,735,290 


97.8 


3,654,380 


1 ,326,690 


97.3 


1.291,510 


716,720 


96.6 


692,130 


vlOUNTAIN 


1,329,200 


96.0 


1,275,970 


733,200 


96.5 


707,190 


329,850 


95.8 


3 1 6,060 


266,150 


95.0 


252,720 


MONTANA 


155,600 


97.2 


151,260 


88,380 


97.4 


86,090 


30,560 


97.1 


29,670 


36,660 


96.8 


35,500 


IDAHO 


156,000 


97.3 


151,820 


69,290 


97.1 


67,310 


33,630 


97.3 


32,720 


53,080 


97.6 


51,790 


WYOMING 


8 1 ,900 


97.1 


79,510 


40,560 


97.2 


39,420 


24,570 


97.6 


23,970 


16,770 


96.1 


16,120 


COLORADO 


363,100 


96.9 


351,920 


240,840 


97.3 


234,220 


67,730 


96.6 


65,420 


54,530 


95.9 


52,280 


NEW MEXICO 


168,000 


90.9 


152,740 


82,570 


91.5 


75,570 


41,930 


91.1 


38,200 


43,500 


89.6 


38,970 


ARIZONA 


184,100 


93.7 


172,580 


75,290 


94.1 


70,880 


76,860 


94.5 


72,670 


31,950 


90.9 


29,030 


UTAH 


175,200 


98.5 


172,500 


1 12,770 


98.5 


1 1 1 ,040 


36,070 


98.7 


35,610 


26,360 


98.1 


25,850 


NEVADA 


45,300 


96.3 


43,640 


23,500 


96.4 


22,660 


18,500 


96.2 


17,800 


3,300 


96.4 


3,180 


'ACIFIC 


4,449,500 


98.0 


4,362,050 


3,002,090 


98.2 


2,947,190 


996,840 


97.9 


975.450 


450,570 


97.5 


439,410 


WASHINGTON 


729,900 


97.8 


713,720 


403,650 


97.5 


393,740 


209,520 


98.2 


205,660 


1 16,730 


97.9 


1 14,320 


OREGON 


497,000 


97.4 


483,830 


273,530 


97.7 


267,1 10 


141,060 


97.3 


137,300 


82.410 


96.4 


79,420 


CALIFORNIA 


3,222,600 


98.2 


3,164,500 


2,324,910 


98.3 


2,286,340 


646,260 


97.9 


632,490 


251,430 


97.7 


245,670 


'Copyright 1949 Broadcasl 


Measurement Bureau 





















AUGUST 1949 



23 




"Patrick O'Riley," star of program, goes out on laundry routes to meet contest winners, pick-up men 



The Chicago 



laundry lesson 



When lOl laundries get together 
to sell, here's what happens 





Association advertising on 
the air follows two widely 
divergent patterns. One takes 
the shape of the expensive, impressive 
network program designed not so 
much to sell what the association re- 
presents, hut rather to do a general 
educational joh for the public on the 
particular service or product. An out- 
standing example of this type of as- 
sociation-sponsored web program is 
the Railroad Hour, presented on ABC 
Monday evenings by the Association 
of American Railroads. There is no 
attempt made on this program to sell 
directly any particular road; the com- 
mercials merely point out in a digni- 
fied, prestige manner the advantages 
of travel by train. 

The second pattern of association 
broadcast advertising is on a smaller, 
far more direct basis. Selling what 
the association's members have to 
offer the public, rather than presenting 
a primer on what the association itself 
represents, is the principal aim. It has 
to be that way, since the type of 
association using this pattern is gen- 
erally comprised of small businesses 
which cannot afford to contribute co- 
operatively to any advertising cam- 
paign that doesn't produce at least a 
modicum of direct results. 

Typical of this sort of trade group 
is the Chicago Laundry Owners As- 
sociation. Organized in 1909, it now 
includes 130 vari-sized laundry estab- 
lishments in and around the Windy 
City. Although the complete member- 
ship is not in on the advertising pro- 
gram planned and carried out by the 
Association, those that are have found 
it to be definitely worthwhile. 

Despite the fact that the CLOA's 
current radio campaign started only 
last 20 March, the organization is no 
newcomer to the medium. Before the 
war its members benefited nicely from 
a local program called My Diary. 
Overloaded during the war years, the 
laundries suspended advertising. But 
with those lush ( for them ) years over, 
and with the knowledge that their 
principal competitors, the major soap 
manufacturers, were spending an esti- 
mated $30,000 a week in air time 
alone in the Chicago market, the laun- 
dry men decided it was high time to 
get back into radio. 

The result of the decision was a 
show called Pick-Up Time on WBBM, 
the Chicago CBS outlet, Mondav 



.< Drug officials mark seventh year of week- 
ly public-service show on Milwaukee's WISN 



through Friday 8:30-8:45 a.m.. and 
Sunday 12:00-12:15 p.m. Built by 
WBBM program director Al Morey, 
local salesman Stan Levey, and the 
CLOA's agency, John W. Shaw Ad- 
vertising, Inc., the program offered a 
combination of song, talk, jokes — and 
informal friendliness. Its mainstay 
and mc is a character using the name 
of "Patrick O'Riley"; 15 staff an- 
nouncers were auditioned for the part, 
all of them sounding too much the 
actor, too professional, until Val Sher- 
man. WBBM program manager who 
hadn't done much actual air work for 
six years, was moved out of his desk 
job and back in front of a mike to 
be "O'Riley." Sherman had what the 
Association wanted: a warm, friendly 
personality and a voice that would sell 
good-will the way a laundry route 
man should. 

Pick-Up Time has a touch of give- 
away program to it. On each show, a 
week's laundry is handled free for 
the five women who send in the best 
humorous or whimsical stories which 
are selected to be read on the pro- 
gram. A Dor-Meyer Food Mixer is 
given away each Sunday as a grand 
prize. Except for the listeners' stories 
and jokes, Sherman ad libs all of the 
show, and sings a song or two. Singer 
Jeanne MacKenna assists on the week- 
day quarter-hours, with vocalist 
Louise King heard on the Sunday 
broadcast, the change of voice being 
used to give the impression that laun- 
dry route man Patrick is lounging 
around at home with "Mom." 

Handling advertising for a good- 
sized trade association calls for equal 
parts of strong planning, patience, per- 
severance, and good luck, according 
to John W. Shaw, of the agency which 
bears his name. "In every associa- 
tion," he says, "there are two, three, 
or more who don't believe in what 
you're proposing. Those are the tar- 
gets for your arguments. If you can 
talk to the skeptics with enough 
conviction you can make your point 
with the whole committee. 

"Pre-planning in the case of as- 
sociation advertising," Shaw con- 
tinues, "is more important than on 
any other type of account, and things 
must be carefully outlined so that 
there is no gap or misunderstanding 
among the different-thinking indivi- 
dual association members. Then, once 
(Please turn to page 59) 



Each sponsor-laundry ties in its phone num- 
ber with "Pick-up Time" via ads, contests 



SEND YOUR LAUNDRY 

T01HEUUNDRY 

6 GOOD REASONS WHY THE LAUNDRY DOES YOUR 
LAUNDRY BETTER AND WHY IT COSTS LESS 






1, Easier on Clothes. Tests show 
clothes washed by the average 
housewife wear out 31 % faster. 

2, Scientifically equipped. Modern, 
Association member laundries keep 
informed of new fabrics, cleansing 
agents and engineering improve- 
ments, 

3, Color and fabric separation. Each 
. bundle separated by fabric and color 

as many as 8 times. 



4. Safe cleansing . No harsh bleaching. 
Gentle cleansers and rain-soft water 
mixed in correct proportions by 
automatic controls. 

5. More sanitary. 10 to 12 water changes 
at exact temperatures. 

O. Association laundries do everything 

—pick up . . , wash dry iron 

. . . fold . . . deliver. 



CHICAGO LAUNDRY OWNERS ASSOCIATION • 188 W.Randolph St. 
Chicago's Finest Laundries— organized now to give you improved service. 



Aagaard Laundry Co 

Ace Laundry Company... 
Alba Laundry Company. . 
American Laundry, Inc.. 

Angelus Laundry 

Antiseptic Laundry 

Argyle Laundry, Inc 

Atlas Wet Wash Laundry. 
Auburn Laundry . ..^... 
Avalon Laundry Co 



Y A 7-1800 
LO 1-1700 
MO 6-S071 
VA 6-4100 
LO 1-2044 
LA S-0500 
IR 8-7726 
LA 1-7242 
HU 3-1111 
SA 1-7060 



Bee Hive Laundry Co 8E 3-4022 

Bissell Laundry, Inc DR 3-3430 

The Brooks Laundry All 7-1060 



Calumet Laundry Co 

Capitol Laundry 

Cascade W W Laundries. . 
Centenniel Laundry Co... 
Cemral WW Laundry Co. 
Chicago W W 4 New Way 

Ldrys 

Chief Wash Co 



FA 4-3702 
NE 0-7400 
R A 3-4000 
MO 0-2300 
IR 0-9540 

JU 8-6800 
LO 1-4044 



Call one of these laundries 
near you. Pick-up and delivery 
service at your convenience. 
Membership in the Chicago 
Laundry Owners Association 
is your assurance that you get 
the finest professional care for 
your washing. 



L~ 



Modern Ldry. & Dry Clng. 

Co WE 6-0987 

Montana Laundry, Inc.. . . B I 0-4020 
Morgan Linen Service, Inc. CA 5-7044 

Mother's Laundry L0 1-7520 

Mueller Bros. Laundry... Bi 7-6277 

National Laundry Co. AU 7-3000 

Normal W W Laundries. . RA 3-3140 
North Chicago Laundry Co. BI 0-3210 
Northern Laundry BE 5-2121 



Forut 393 



Oak Leaf Laundry 

Paradise Wash Co IN 3-3004 

Park View W W Laundry. CA 0-7172 
SA 1-0740 
BR 8-0009 



Daly's Laundry Co 018-5308 

Dependable Laundry 

Service SU 4-454S 

Derby Laundry Co SU 7-1711 

prexel Laundry Co , , OA 4-1473 

Eagle laundry Co NE S-7SO0 

Eclipse Laundry Co TR 4-7500 

Edgewater Laundry Co.. . . LO 1-3020 

Elston Laundry Co KE 0-0452 

Empire Laundry Co WA 5-3300 

Esquire Shirt Laundry. .. AM 2-4402 
Excelsior Ldry. & Dry 

Clng. Co CA 5-0622 

Family Favorite 

Laundry Co AR 0-1444 

French Hand Ldry. Co. . . . EA 7-0300 

Garden City W W Ldry.. . VA 0-7200 

Gem Laundry DA 6-2420 

Grand Laundry Co VI 2-0000 

Great Northern Ldry. Co.. RO 4-3400 
Great Southern Ldry PU 5-0041 



Hanson's Laundry, Inc. . . , 
iHappy Day Ldrs. & Dry 

Cleaners 

Harrison Laundry Co — 

Home Crystal Laundries 
The Howard Laundry. . , , 
[Hyde Park Ldry. & 
Clnrs., Inc 



BI 8-3604 

Dl 2-0444 
NE 8-0403 
LA 3-0700 
SH 3-8504 

PL 2-7140 



The Peoples Laundry. 

Pilgrim Laundry, Inc 

Pilsen Ldry. & Dry Clng. 

Co 

Progress Laundry Co 



CA 0-3504 
PE 0-3704 



Rainbow Laundry, Inc SP 2-8444 



Ideal Ldry. & Dry Clnrs.. , TR 4-1400 

Jewel Ldry. & Dry Clnrs.. BR 4-1004 

Kennedy Laundry Co PU 5-2027 

King's Laundry Cj> SE 3-O004 

Kline's Laundry Ml 3-2691 

Lake Park Laundry Ml 3-4741 

[Lake View Ldry. Co LA 5-4287 

Leader Laundry Co YA 7-4844 

Reading Laundry VI 7-7755 

[Lewis Laundry Co VI 0-7100 

lexin9ton Ldry. & Clnrs., FA 4-0732 

life Laundry, Inc CA 7-0804 

Lincoln-Paragon Ldrys. . . L0 1-3355 

Majestic Laundry BR 8-7120 

Manhattan Laundry Co... LA 1-4145 
Marshal) Sq. W W Ldry.. BI7-7040 
Mattmlller Laundry Co... VI 7-7131 
Metropole Laundry HY 3-3100 



Safety Wet Wash Ldry.. 
Sanitary Laundry, Inc.. 

Sheridan Laundry 

Shirt Service Laundry. . . 
South Chicago Laundry Co. 
South Shore Laundry..., 
South Side Laundry Co.. . 

Standard Laundry Co 

Steven's W W Laundry... 

Supreme Laundry Co 

Surf Hand Laundry 

Swan Laundries Co 



VA 0-2100 
AV 3-4700 

IN 3-1100 
WA 4-7400 
SO 0-0800 

PL 2-4100 

VI 2-0200 
CA 5-4700 
HE 4-3723 
SP 2-2544 
BU 1-5957 

Kl 5-3396 



s*^ LISTEN TO 

"LAUMDW PICKUP TIME" 

a new radio show every 
week day morning 

WBBM 8:30 a.m. 

Monday through Friday and 
SUNDAYS AT 12 NOON 

STAW1H6 PATBICH O'B.l" 



CHICAGO LAUNDRY OWNERS ASSOCIATION 

188 W. RANDOLPH STREET 



The Best Laundry & Clg. 

Co OA 4-1383 

Tivoli W W Laundry Co.. . FA 4-7000 
Toll Bros. Laundry MO 0-1310 

Universal Laundry RO 2-0636 

Up-To-Date Laundry Co.. PU 5-0700 

Victory Laundry & Clng. 

Co VA 0-5040 

Westwood Laundry Co.. . . TU 9-1100 
White Way Laundry Co.. . AT 5-3800 
Woodlawn Laundry Corp.. FA 4-4014 
World Laundry, Inc KE 0-1047 



VALUABLE PRIZES FOR BRIGHT 
IDEAS FROM LISTENERS 

I Five lucky winners wDI each be 
I given a week's free laundry 
service each day with one 
; grand priie every Sunday 




I AUGUST 1949 



25 




THE HAUNTING HOUR" OVER KRNT, DES MOINES, BRINGS FRIGIDAIRE CUSTOMERS TO ELSIE MUNN OF MUNN AND CASSADAY 



Are you getting the most out of your 



dealer co-operative dollar? 




Radio co-operative advertis- 
ing can be profitable to ra- 
dio sponsors. It isn't profit- 
able for Philco, Aviation (Crosley Di- 
vision) Corporation, and RCA-Victor, 
for example, just because they are 
Philco, Crosley, and RCA-Victor. it 
pays off for them and others because 
they have learned the hard lessons of 
experience in how to get the most out 
of it. 

Getting the most from cooperative 
campaigns involving both radio and 
other media pre-supposes the advertiser 
understands the plusses to be gained 
and how to capitalize on them. It pre- 
supposes he won't try to make the na- 
tional-local combination do what it 
isn't designed to do. 

Perhaps the biggest single miscon- 
ception on the use of the cooperative 
plan is that it is just another approach 
to national advertising. It leads to frus- 
trating experiences. Some of co-op ad- 



26 



vertising's severest critics deliver their 
most telling attacks against co-op diffi- 
culties that inevitably grow out of the 
fallacy that it is a substitute for na- 
tional advertising. The fact that under 
special conditions a few firms have 
used successfully only co-op advertis- 
ing for national coverage doesn't mean 
it is a sound general practice. 

Probably the next biggest criticism 
leveled against the co-op idea assumes 
the manufacturer's advertising depart- 
ment just naturally has to be inept in 
administering the program. Principal 
specific criticisms will be dealt with 
shortly. 

While it is true that characteristics 
of national and cooperative advertising 
may overlap to a considerable degree, 
it is not difficult for working purposes 
to make this general distinction: na- 
tional advertising is geared to create 
demand: co-operative and other local 
advertising aims more specifically to 



move the product from individual 
dealer to customer. 

The advantages of matching dollars 
with dealers are often obscured by 
certain false assumptions as to the 
legitimate purposes of jointly-spon- 
sored advertising. Sponsors who fail 
to define clearly just what they aim to 
achieve from matching dealer expendi- 
tures for advertising are likely to fall 
into two or three common fallacies. 
One of these is to regard that part of 
locally-placed advertising paid for by 
the dealer as "extra" advertising. 

It happens to be true that in many 
cases co-op funds enable a dealer to 
place announcements or buy programs 
in addition to what he could have af- 
forded without co-op money. But a 
manufacturer with a definite goal and 
a plan for reaching it will have calcu- 
lated, within bounds of his budget. 
how much to spend, where to spend it, 
and in what media I in the case of co-op 

SPONSOR 



money, of course, the judgment of dis- 
tributors and dealers may affect de- 
cisions on local media) in order to do 
the job. 

Spending by dealers therefore be- 
comes part of doing the advertising 
job, and the haphazard "extra" view 
of dealer spending is meaningless. 

This raises what seems at first blush 
to be a deadly criticism of the co-op 
idea. Not enough dealers take advant- 
age of co-op deals to give solid local 
support to the national program. This 
merely says, however, that a company 
has failed to do the necessary educa- 
tional job with dealers, or perhaps dis- 
tributors. There are literally thousands 
of instances in which local dealers have 
not been aware of even the possibility 
of cooperative advertising, much less 
that such aids as transcribed announce- 
ments were available free from the 
manufacturer's advertising department. 

Two other common reasons fre- 
quently cited as arguments for a coop- 
erative program is that it helps open 
new accounts and strengthens the com- 



petitive position against rivals who use 
cooperative advertising. The answer to 
the first argument given by top-notch 
salesmen is that they are selling a 
product together with the prestige and 
integrity of the manufacturer. They 
aren't selling — or shouldn't have to 
sell — advertising (not if they have a 
product the dealer can sell at a profit) . 

As for spending cooperative money 
just because rivals do, no advertising 
manager needs that excuse for spend- 
ing money, unless he doesn't know 
what he wants from local promotion, 
or how to get it. If he does, he'll spend 
the money or not spend it without 
reference to what competitors are 
doing. 

There is one reason (among others) 
why a properly executed co-op cam- 
paign can pay off. It stimulates most 
dealers to more advertising and more 
energetic sales effort. The tie-in of his 
name helps build his prestige and in- 
crease store traffic. As a by-product, the 
manufacturer also gets the benefit, in 
a majority of cases, of the local rate 



for his share of the billing. In only a 
few cases does a radio station make no 
distinction between national and local 
rates. 

The over-all objection to this point 
of view is simply that the results aren't 
worth the money spent and the trouble 
of administering the program. The 
probable fact is that manufacturers 
who believe this have simply checked 
results of well-organized campaigns. 
And their own administration of a 
cooperative program has probably 
been faulty. 

Very few firms maintain a marketing 
research department capable of con- 
ducting any big-scale investigations. 
But shortly before the Robinson-Pat- 
man Act became law one company com- 
pleted a test of the effect of their co-op 
program on dealer sales and adver- 
tising. The firm limited its test to 
areas similar in gross business expec- 
tancy, with similar proportions of big, 
medium, and small dealers. 

(Please turn to page 56) 



lacco 



There's very little co-op money in 
the cigarette and cigar field. From 
time to time smoking tobaccos have 
shared advertising costs with dealers 



home furnishings 



over 50% of the time 
are willing to share 
advertising costs with 
big retailers up to 4% 



foods 



seldom permit advertising allowances. 
Exceptions are higher-priced items and 
special seasonal campaigns. Consider- 
ation is all-out selling by retailer 




jar *P<>sf'S 

a 40% BRAN 




Most refiners have co-op adver- 
tising plans. The more national 
advertising they do, the smaller 
the stress on co-op merchandising 



Most radio manufacturers 
have complete plans which 
are made available to deal- 
ers. Allowances run to 8% 



co-op 



ploOnCQfC P' ans - However, introductory cam- 
UludlloCl O paigns of new products usually 



paig 
carry 



co-op 



P"" 

dealer 



jonus plan 




How far 
does jour 
publicity go? 



Sid Grauman pushes Jimmy Durante's nose into concrete for posterity Tlllllovtr*! ^n>lli>l Ilillo I It'll 

characterizes Kenyon & Eckhardt and Ayer 

press agentry has a direct impact on sales 



J Broadcast advertising is a 
medium that has to be fed 
after it's bought. The more it's nur- 
tured, the better it produces. This 
does not mean every program or every 
campaign can be made an outstanding 
producer of sales, but that promotion, 
publicity, and exploitation not only in- 
crease the size of the audience for any 
program, but frequently produce prod- 
uct acceptance themselves. 

A quick way to bury a good program 
is to ignore it. Network publicity and 
station publicity departments are pres- 
sured by literallv hundreds of sponsors 
and their agencies for promotion and 
publicity. They have their limitations, 
and. as Earl Mullin. head of the Ameri- 
can Broadcasting Company, expresses 
it, "our job is to sell the network and 
its productions. We do not ignore 
sponsored programs but we are natural- 
ly limited in what we can do on a con- 
sistent basis for them." Naturally, they 
do more for advertisers and agencies 
that are constantly on their necks. They 
do this in self-defense. 

A hat company sponsored a "talent 



opportunity" hour several years ago on 
a major network. The advertising 
manager of the organization made such 
a nuisance of himself that, although 
the network extended itself to do an 
outstanding job of promotion and pub- 
licity, the bumblebee buzzing around 
web ears made it impossible to do the 
complete job. 

What is important in this case is 
the fact that anything like a "talent 
search" cannot be publicized and pro- 
moted by a network publicity and pro- 
motion department. This type of pro- 
gram must have its own promotion and 
publicity staff operating under the 
supervision of a capable advertising 
agency exploitation man. The word 
exploitation is used advisedly instead 
of publicity or promotion, because the 
handling of an amateur or new talent 
show requires a great deal more than 
publicity and promotion. It requires 
the setting that only a motion-picture- 
trained exploitation man can give it. 
That's what's being done for Horace 
Heidts Philip Morris program, has 
been done for years for the Major 



Bowes Amateur Hour and for any other 
really successful promotional-type pro- 
gram. Truth or Consequences and 
People Are Funny are two typical 
promotional-type programs that would 
die ratingwise. were it not for constant 
top-drawer exploitation. 

Programs headed bv comedians also 
require constant exploitation. Funrn 

Fern Sharp (WBNS, Columbus, O.) sends fan A'io 




\ >r~. 




CLEVELAND'S WNBK TELECASTS THE ACTUAL MAKING OF AMAZO. MILDRED FUNNELL DOES THE HONORS FOR THE CAMERA 



men are personality men — most of 
them very unfunny in daily life. Man) 
of them are the opposite of amusing in 
their business and personal relations. 
If they were permitted to "be them- 
selves," they'd lose their followings so 
rapidly that sponsors wouldn't get half 
the audiences which the comics are 
paid to deliver. 

These stars have their own public- 
relations men and women. Since they're 
paid by the stars, the objective of most 
of what they do must be to increase 
the prestige of their bosses. Many of 
these press agents are top-flight news- 



paper space-grabbers, but they are 
seldom exploitation men, seldom are 
conscious of what sells merchandise. 
They're selling a stage, radio, TV, or 
motion-picture personality, not a prod- 
uct. 

The problem therefore is to decide 
who is to build up and protect the 
sponsors interest in a radio program 
or personality. In some few cases the 
advertiser's organization itself rides 
herd on its "property." That's true to a 
large degree of Philip Morris and 
Horace Heidt, of Toni and its air pro- 
grams. Most of the time, the problems 



of keeping a broadcast advertising 
campaign and program in the con- 
sumer eye falls upon the advertising 
agency, much as many of them dislike 
the publicity job. 

Agency publicity departments are 
appendages that have grown on the 
body advertising. For years they have 
been suspect, newspaper and magazine 
staffs feeling that advertising pressure 
would be used to get material in pub- 
lications if it didn't get in some other 
way. That odor is rapidly evaporating. 
Agencies find that they have to fight 
(Please turn to page 41) 



WHKC, Columbus, O., broadcasts a Boy Scout troop making Amazo on Homemalcers 10 show Kiwanis Club member trys hand at Amazo 






TYPICAL UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA PANEL THAT SUBJECTED ITSELF TO "LIE DETECTOR" TESTS OF COMMERCIAL REACTIONS 

The faltering farm commercial 

Most announcements beamed at the 
rural audience are highly unrealistic 




Farm commercials apparent- 
ly do not rouse the farmer 
any more than they stimulate 
the city dweller. Air advertising ad- 
dressed to the urbanite appeals just 
as strongly to the listener who is 100 
miles from nowhere. 

These are two conclusions drawn 
from a research study completed by 
the University of Oklahoma for SPON- 
SOR, under the supervision of Sherman 
P. Lawton. Not a single rural com- 
mercial of the five tested appealed more 
to the men who buy the products ad- 
vertised, than they appealed to listen- 
ers, who wouldn't know what to do 
with the product, let alone use it. 
The reactions of the farm and city 



audiences were conducted through the 
use of the psychogalvanometer reacto- 
meter ( lie detector type of measuring 
device I . Four groups of farmer men 
and women (110 in all) and five 
groups of city men and women 1 147 in 
all) were tested. 

Twelve commercials were recorded 
off-the-air for the test. Six were ad- 
dressed to farmers, three were pin- 
pointed to city dwellers, and three were 
planned to sell the housewife, rural or 
urban. None of the advertisers knew 
that his commercials were to be used 
for the survey. The idea was to test 
what was being used, not "ideal" copy 
or appeal. In the rural group two 
Nutrena Feed commercials, two Conroy 



overall commercials, one Parkin Hatch- 
ery, and one Skelly 2-4-D were tested. 
In the city groups, there were two 
Hotpoint and one Phillips gasoline an- 
nouncements given the "lie-test" treat- 
ment. The commercials which were 
supposed to appeal to both rural and 
urban women were for Calumet baking 
powder I 2 I and Cain's coffee. 

Not only were commercials for these 
different types of products tested, but 
the tests were made of various formats. 
There were singing, hillbilly, sound 
effects, and straight. The reactions to 
different formats were far more reveal- 
ing than the reactions to the com- 
mercials themselves. Sound effects 
ranked first, singing commercials sec- 



HOW TO M'KAK Tilt: FABOItTI'S LAXtil AGE 



1. Farm commercials should be written by someone with first-hand 
understanding of farm business, farm people, and farm products. 

2. Copy should be highly factual. 

3. Material should be treated seriously. This doesn't mean grimly, nor 
is occasional humor barred, if not at expense of farmers. 



4. Details on how to get most out of products, what to expect from 
their use, and what others have done with them, get results. 

5. Don't overdo commercial time at expense of program. 

6. Give qualified farm directors right to use own judgment in editing 
commercials. They know their listeners — and listeners make sales. 

Frank Cooley, Agricultural Coordinator, WHAS, Louisville, Ky. 



ond, singing commercials with a 
straight tag third with the rural panels 
and fourth with the city groups, hill- 
billy formats ranked third with urban 
audiences and fourth with the farm 
audience to whom they were supposed 
to appeal, and straight commercials 
ranked last with both city and farm 
listeners. 

The rank order is not too important, 
for the University researchers point 
out that it was only between the sound- 
effect and straight commercials that 
the difference in response was signif- 
icant. The average response to sound- 
effect commercials was 22.7 and to 
straight commercials 6.2 with urban 
panels. With rural groups sound-effect 
announcements brought a response of 
12.6 and straight advertising 4.4. These 
differences are significant. The other 
variations were generally under 20% 
and thus judged to be not vital. 

There was little difference between 
responses of city and farm groups 
to farm and city product advertising. 
The University of Oklahoma report 
indicated the PGR* responses were 
as follows: 



Cotntnervials PGR* 'tested bu I nirersiiy of Oktuhomu 





Farm 


City 


Panel 


products 


products 


City men 





6.88 


Farm men 


11.2 


6.02 


City women 


12.04 


3.82 


Farm women 


3.13 


3.83 


City combined 


8.60 


4.60 


Farm combined 


7.92 


5.42 



It would appear that the response of 
city women to farm commercials is 
significantly higher than their response 
to the tested air advertising for city 
products. This, however, is not true. 
City women enjoyed a sound-effect 
commercial for Parkin Hatchery to 
such a degree that this response alone 
pulled up their reaction to all farm- 
product air advertising tested. If the 
response to the Parkin Hatchery sound- 
effect commercial were eliminated from 
the report, the response to farm-prod- 
uct commercials would have been 7.28 
for city women and the "City com- 
bined" index would have been 3.56. 

The amazing correlation between 
"'City combined'' and "Farm com- 
bined" is such that the University re- 
port concludes, "If the combined 
samples used in this study are accepted 
as typical, it can be said that there is 
no indication that farmers listen any 
more attentively to advertisements for 
farm products than they do for city 
products." 

The distinction between farm and 
city products frequently is artificial 
(Please turn to page 55) 

* Psychogalvanometer reactometer 



Product 


Type 


Consumers addressed 




Nulrena Feed 




Singing 


Farm men 




Hotpoint products 


Singing, plus tag 


City women 




Calumet baking 


powder 


Hillbilly 


All women 




Conroy overalls 




Hillbilly 


Farm men 




Calumet baking 


powder 


Straight 


All women 




Conroy overalls 




Straight 


Farm men 




Cain's coffee 




Sound effect 


All women 




Nutrena Feed 




Singing, plus tag 


Farm men 




Skelly 2-4-D 




Straight 


Farm men 




Hotpoint products 


Singing 


City women 




Phillips gasoline 




Straight 


City men 




Parkin Hatchery 




Ssund effect 


Farm men 



psychogalvanometer reactometer (a form of lie detector) 




Researchers check "lie detector" (psychogalvanometer reactometer) reactions of panel to commercials 



PUR* responses to eotnniereisil formats 



Type 


City Responses 


Farm Responses 
















Men 


Women 


Combined 


Men 


Women 


Combined 


Sound effect 


20.9 


23.2 


22.7 


18.7 


6.5 12.6 


Singing 


12.2 


12.8 


12.7 


17.8 


5.7 11.8 


Singing, plus straight tag 


16.4 


8.5 


10.7 


16.1 


5.6 


10.8 


Character (hillbilly) 


12.5 


10.3 


11.3 


10.5 


2.3 


9.7 


Straight 


7.9 


5.6 


6.2 


8.5 





4.4 



* psychogalvanometer reactometer (a form of lie detector) 



I AUGUST 1949 



31 



£s* 






"♦-» 

^ 







$V * 



■ • 




-'**>•" 



4 



v- 



V 






How to sample 
a vacation 



Kndio mills a new dimension to 

resort anil travel advertising 



over-all 



Millions are spent on re- 
sort and travel advertising. 
Only a relatively small portion of those 
millions finds its way to the air. This 
is despite the fact that broadcast adver- 
tising reaches its listeners at a time 
when they are relaxed and most sus- 
ceptible to the "take a vacation" idea. 
A few state bureaus use broadcast time 
to extol the vacation advantages of their 
acres, some railroads and air lines do a 
fair air-selling job on their transporta- 
tion merits but by and large the mil- 
lions go to black-and-white media as 
they have for generations. 

This is, in part, a form of pay-off. 
Newspapers run extensive resort and 
travel sections. Publicity, pictorial and 
wordage, is run free to the extent of 
multi-millions of lines. Newspapers 
claim, and rightly so, that they sell the 
vacation idea all year 'round, that 
they condition readers to turn to their 



aupling breakfast 



pages for advertising of resorts and 
information about travel. By reference, 
it's claimed that radio has built no 
vacation-conscious group ready and 
eager to make reservations from rail- 
roads and airlines, at mountain and 
beach hotels. There are no depart- 
mental resort periods on the air. 

All this is true, but the truth doesn't 
go far enough. Broadcast advertising 
can and does sell vacationing generally 
and specific vacation spots, when it's 
called upon to do so. Because it comes 
invited into the home, its audience is 
always ready to be sold relaxation 
away from home — the lure of the ro- 
mantic, the open road, new friends, the 
magic of the unknown. 

This it not just theory. During the 
past few years, some resort and travel 
advertisers have broken away from 
their normal procedures and have dis- 
covered that broadcast advertising does 



an unusually effective job in promoting 
business. The famous Grossinger's in 
the New York and Florida; Allen-A 
ranch in New Hampshire; the Year 
Round Playground Club of Ruidoso, 
New Mexico; Ed Craney's Montana 
Boosters, Lake Tahoe, and a number 
of transportation companies have 
ample proof of how the spoken word 
on the air produces direct traceable 
business for them. 

While routine resort advertising 
translated to the aural medium pro- 
duces business, the new trend of sam- 
pling what resorts have to offer has 
been found to be many times more 
effective. Grossinger's broadcast many 
of its pre-season weekend parties to 
sample the entertainment available on 
its many acres. That's also the formula 
of the Allen-A Ranch up in New Hamp- 
shire. Allen-A. however, does not stop 
at a few pre-season broadcasts. It spon- 




sampling sunbathing 



Announcer and summer Santa tell the "world" all about the good food 

ith a piano on wheels, mule, three woodsmen, 
d a microphone, Allen-A guests are amused 




Description of girls on lawn is bound to bring out sun worshipers and wolves 



sorg a weekly Breakfast at the Allen- A 
over three stations. WLNH. Laconia, 
N. H., WWNH, Rochester, N. H., and 
the 50,000-watt WLAW, Lawrence, 
Mass. 

The broadcast started as a one-sta- 
tion airing over WLNH. Allen H. Al- 
bee, owner of Allen-A, didn't buy the 
time as advertising but as an entertain- 
ment stunt for his guests — and to get 
them up early for breakfast at least 
once a week (Tuesdays). If, reasoned 
Albee, thousands each year travel miles 
to participate in broadcasts like Break- 
fast in Hollyivood, Breakfast Club, and 
a host of like events, why wouldn't his 
guests enjoy getting up early one morn- 
ing to be part of an Allen-A version of 
a like shindig. 

They did. 

The demand for reservations for 
breakfast in the dining room from 
which the broadcast originated im- 
mediately swamped Albee but he 
posted a "first-come, first seated" pol- 
icy. The dining room fills up at least 
an hour before air time. 



The broadcast is a typical breakfast- 
club type of program. Al Maffie. 
WLNH program director, is the mc- 
personality boy. The oldest woman at 
each broadcast receives "twin" or- 
chids, an "object" is hidden and when 
found usually creates a riot. Generally 
it's a chicken, pig. or rabbit. Coin- 
tossing sweepstakes are held. Quiz 
stunts in which difficult questions are 
asked a man and his wife, with the 
wife always answering correctly, are 
part of the breakfast routine. The wife 
is fed the answers via tiny earphones 
hidden beneath her hair. The guests 
know the gag — all except the husband 
who wonders what has happened to his 
wife's brains overnight. 

Like all early a.m. audience partici- 
pation shows, it's all very low I.Q. 
stuff, but that's what gets and amuses 
the vacationers. 

As indicated. Breakfast at the Allen- 
A was originally just another spot in 
the resort's entertainment schedule for 
which Albee budgets $35,000. At first 
blush, it didn't seem logical that the 



program would bring added business. 
since WLNH is a local station and 
leaches the vacation area and its own 
Laconia, New Hampshire. Listeners 
were either locals or men and women 
already on vacation. Neither group 
were, thought Albee, "prospects." 

In this he was wrong. While they 
weren't prospects for the immediate 
season, they were prospects for next 
season reservations and a sizable num- 
ber who heard the show during its 
1948 season while vacationing at other 
resorts in the Lake Regions of New 
Hampshire, are guests of Allen-A in 
1949. 

Two hundred guests writing for 
reservations this season hoped that the 
program would be broadcast again. 
That gave Albee an idea. Why not use 
the program in the area from which 
most of his guests came — the Boston- 
Lawrence territory. That's just what 
he's doing. The Tuesday Breakfast at 
Allen-A broadcast live over WLNH 
and now WWNH, is tape recorded, cut 
(Please turn to page 41) 



News of water games is aired from beach, and it's a great vacation lure 




Square dances with Western flavor are a top summer feature on summer menus 



Weinie roasts bring out all at hotel. Planned entertainment is important 




While ranches are more luxurious than hotels, guests think they're roughing it 




GREATER VOICE...A GREATER HO THE DHROIT AREA 





IV 



Guardian Building, Detroit 26 • Mutual System 

National Rep. Canadian Rep.*' 

Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. H. N. Stovin & Co. 




in 



I AUGUST 1949 



35 




Mr. Sponsor asks.. 



Why is that advertising agencies' radio pro- 
duction departments funetion at a loss to most 



agencies 



??9 



Tom De Bow 



Director of advertising 
Petroleum Advisors, Inc. 
Cities Service Co., N. Y. 




The 

Picked Panel 
answers 
Mr. De Bow 



The question 
sounds a para- 
phrase of the old 
one, "Have you 
stopped beating 
your wife"? I 
haven't run 
across such a sit- 
uation in my 22 
years in radio 
stations and ad- 
vertising agencies. And if any do func- 
tion at a loss, there must be special 
considerations. Otherwise, it doesn't 
make good business sense. 

There is no reason for more over- 
head in radio than in any other phase 
of agency operations. Certainly arti- 
sans in the radio field should prove no 
more expensive than those in other 
media. In fact radio people, initially 
trained in radio stations, are often 
versatile enough to discharge a variety 
of responsibilities in contrast to the 
extremes of specialization that fre- 
quently exist among personnel em- 
ployed in copy, art, and other phases 
of space advertising. 

When a radio department insists 
upon personnel down to the third assis- 
tant stopwatch holder, then the agency 
has high overhead. If, however, people 
are employed who can not only hold a 
stopwatch, but can read it too. the 
agency has moved a step in the right 
direction, and eliminated some special- 



ization in favor of common sense. 

If in this highly competitive post-war 
eia there are still radio production de- 
partments operating at a loss to the 
agency, I'll wager that ways and means 
will be figured out to make them profit- 
able, barring the factor of special con- 
siderations. 

I'm reminded of the new farmer 

down home in Oklahoma. He bought 

some pigs for fifty dollars, fed them 

all winter, and sold them in the spring 

for fifty dollars. He was told he 

couldn't make money that way. His 

cryptic reply was, "I found that out." 

Blayne Butcher 

Radio Director 

Newell-Emmett Co., N. Y. 



I have found, 
over the years, 
that most agen- 
cies operating 
their own prod- 
uction depart- 
ments are faced 
with the fixed 
costs of operation 
on a continuous 
basis. This means 
that the agency, in order to maintain 
an efficient working organization, must 
carry on its payroll its basic production 
personnel during periods when busi- 
ness actually doesn't warrant their ex- 
penditure. 

Too, so that top production talent 
can be secured, top salaries have to 
be paid for relatively few shows. In 
package agencies the control of this 
top talent is divided over a number of 
important shows. 

Lester L. Wolff 

Lester L. Wolff Adv. Corp. 

New York 




**&*■ 




An advertising 
agency that goes 
out to build a 
large radio pro- 
duction depart- 
ment is in some- 
what the same 
position as an 
m% agency that 

^^k \ builds a big print- 

ing plant to han- 
dle space advertising. Financially, an 
agency with a printing plant attached 
is not a sound idea. By the same token, 
an agency that attempts to confine as 
many of the creative and production 
functions of radio, and more recently 
television, within its own shop may 
well find itself with an over-staffed 
department that is functioning at a 
financial loss. This applies to every- 
thing from the creation and production 
of radio and TV station breaks to large- 
scale, high-budget programs. 

Our agency, J. D. Tardier & Co., 
does a great deal of work with TV 
film announcements and station breaks. 
We would be foolish, however, to try 
to hire in enough pepole to do the 
complete job ourselves. Instead, we 
use the services of a number of reliable 
TV film producers. We plan our own 
campaigns for a client, then turn the 
scripts over to a film producer for 
shooting. In that way, we take advan- 
tage of the generally competitive situa- 
tion among the large group of indepen- 
dent packagers and producers who 
have been at their job for years, for 
the most part, and who can work well 
with agencies on client problems. This 
is just one method and one place where- 
in we keep our overhead down. Pro- 
ducers work for us when we have work 
for them to do. They are not part of 



36 



SPONSOR 



a large staff, which may look impres- 
sive to a client, but which only adds a 
financial burden to the general agency 
overhead. 

Another reason why radio depart- 
ments, particularly at the very large 
agencies rather than at small and 
medium-size ones, have financial prob- 
lems is that radio and TV can often 
be a matter of ups-and-downs. Some 
clients are unwilling to stick to one 
form of radio or TV long enough to 
develop ratings and sales. Some other 
clients, fortunately in the minority, 
are embryonic showmen, and while 
they leave their black-and-white and 
magazine advertising to agencymen 
familiar with the problems of the par- 
ticular medium, they will try to run 
things their own way, sometimes with 
disastrous results, in radio and TV. 
Also, when radio production depart- 
ments get too large, too involved, and 
too loaded with "specialists," a sudden 
cancellation of a client's contract can 
catch an agency off-base with more 
overhead in the department than it can 
readily afford. 

Smaller agencies, with their greater 
compactness, the versatility of the 
agency's staff members, and their will- 
ingness to go out on the open market 
to hire independent producers to do a 
lot of the production chores, do not 
often run into that problem. An agency, 
particularly one with a large television 
staff, will find today that the cost of 
running a large department can only 
go up, due to increased facilities 
charges and generally higher time 
costs. Some of these increases, such 
as extra TV rehearsal costs, are being 
absorbed by producers because of the 
competitive nature of the package- 
building business. Agencies have no- 
body to absorb that kind of cost if 
they are doing all the work by them- 
selves. It has to come out of agency 
overhead. 

There is no single answer to the 
problem of agency radio production 
departments functioning at a financial 
loss. The situation can be corrected 
only by better agency planning, de- 
centralized operations, and a thorough 
knowledge of time-saving and cost- 
cutting methods. 

Bob Kelly 

Radio Director 

J. D. Tarcher & Co., N. Y. 



WCFL 




adds a Ik new star to its crown- 



RUSH HUGHES HAS COME TO CHICAGO and .s heard 

exclusively over WCFL! Here's a vibrant, winning person- 
ality new to Chicago radio. Hughes is an established star with 
unusual style famed for performances over West Coast and 
national networks, and later for record-breaking audience 
ratings in St. Louis. The new Rush Hughes show is full of 
good talk . . . interesting interviews . . . and fine music! 



AN AUDIENCE-PLUS FOR THE RUSH HUGHES SPONSOR 

— he follows the popular Breakfast Club, Monday through 
Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Time is available on a 
block basis in 15-minute strips across the board, or in minute 
announcements on a participating basis. For full information, 
contact WCFL or The Boiling Company, Inc. 



WCFL 

50,000 watts • 1000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 

An ABC Affiliate 



I AUGUST 1949 



37 



Whats the big 






T, 



HIS . . . Change audience participation 
to listener participation. That's the 
big IDEA in Columbia Pacific's Your 
Stand-In and Junior Stand-In, the grown- 
up and juvenile versions of an idea that 
lets the listener compete through a 
"stand-in." 

Example : a half-dozen youngsters in 
a hospital polio ward wrote to quizmaster 
Jack Gregson, asking for a chance to 
win some of the prizes earned by 
youngsters appearing on giveaway shows. 
Junior Stand-In* chose six children who 
had recovered from polio ... let them 
double for the bedridden children. Then 
it tripled the prizes won by the proxies 
in the studio and sent them to the boys 
and girls in the hospital. 

Listener participation is a big IDEA 
that gets big response : Another CPN 
program of this type pulled 13,424 
letters in one week. 

For a big IDEA that can turn response 
into sales . . . call Columbia Pacific, 
the idea network. 

* For sale 



Represented by 
RADIO SALES. Radio 
and Television 
Stations Representative, 
C B S; New York, 
Chicago, Los Angeles, 
Detroit, San Francisco, 
and Memphis 



Columbia Pacific 



— the idea network 



retail sales 
in wgac-land! 

Business is 

BOOMING 

and 
Merchandise is 

MOVING 

As Never Before 

IN WGAC-LAND/ 

Reasons? Here are a few: 

"| # $30,000,000 annual pay- 
roll from newly re-acti- 
vated Camp Gordon! 

2. $72,000,000 Clark Hill 
development in midst of 
construction. 

J Industries still going full 
speed — all types of con- 
struction at all time high 
... no unemployment. 

ADVERTISERS 

are making new safes 
records on 




580 Kc— ABC— 5.000 Watts 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Avery-Knodel 



RTS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



-continued from page 2- 

FM no dead dodo, according 
to recent survey findings 

Northwestern U. radio department recent survey 
indicated that in AM-FM homes 69.4% of time that 
radio was in use FM band was preferred. NBC's 
Washington survey indicated this spring that in 
D.C. there were 142,000 FM homes and 110,500 TV 
homes. In D.C. FM homes listened to FM 2 hours 
and 3 minutes daily. 

General Foods net sales and 
income continue up 

Although Clarence Francis, at his annual press con- 
ference, hedged on heights he thought General Foods 
would reach during its second quarter, GF's net 
sales for that quarter were $8,000,000 over same 
quarter in 1948. Net earnings for first six 
months were $2.50 a share against $2.41 a share in 
same 1948 span. General Foods is a firm believer 
in broadcast advertising to move food products. 

Standard Oil of Ohio 

buys special sports network 

Following lead of number of other great oil com- 
panies, Standard Oil of Ohio is setting up special 
sports network this fall. Network will carry games 
of Cleveland Browns Ail-American Football Confer- 
ence team. WGAR, Cleveland, handled sale and will 
be key station for web. WGAR and 14 stations will 
blanket Ohio. 

Druggists to fight for 
fair-trade pricing 

National Association of Retail Druggists is 
reversing field by starting educational consumer 
campaign pro-fair-trade pricing of drug items. All 
national drug advertisers on air are expected 
to cooperate with Association, with local drug- 
gists already explaining to public reasons why 
fair-trading is good for public. 

Employment and unemployment both 
up — Department of Commerce 

Lost among most employment reports for May was 
fact that while unemployment was up, employment 
was up also. Seemingly contradictory information 
was caused by fact that labor pool was increased by 
large number of youngsters of high-school and 
college age. Influx, due to graduated ex-GIs, 
was greater than for many years. Information 
from Department of Commerce. 



40 



SPONSOR 



PUBLICITY 

(Continued from page 29) 

for position for their clients' adver- 
tising, and that's a big enough burden 
for the actual expenditure in a publi- 
cation to carry. Agency pressure for 
'"editorial cooperation" has been at a 
very low ebb for a number of years. 
Only fringe organizations use the ad- 
vertising big stick to get publicity, and 
their success isn't outstanding, to say 
the least. 

Publicity budgets run from as little 
as $1000 a year to the yearly $250,000 
that was reputed to have been incorp- 
orated in the original Jack Benny- 
Lucky Strike contract. Lack of pub- 
licity on a program is also said to have 
lost agency accounts, and Jack Benny's 
blast against Young & Rubicam is a 
long-remembered example of what can 
happen to an important program han- 
dled by an important agency for an 
important client. (The client at that 
time was General Foods.) 

Each year, The Billboard polls news- 
paper radio editors on what they think 
of agency publicity departments. (The 
poll also checks network and indepen- 
dent press agents.) Agencies do not 
stand too high in the graces of the 
editors. The leaders are generally 
Young & Rubicam, J. Walter Thomp- 
son, N. W. Ayer, Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
and Benton & Bowles. Other agencies 
break into the top ranks in some years, 
but these five are consistently in the 
running. Newspaper editors are able 
to evaluate only the releases of the 
agencies and the direct services they 
render. 

The full scope of a Hal Davis (Ken- 
yon & Eckhardt) operation is seldom 
appreciated by an editor. Hal is an 
exploitation man with the ability of 
selling his clients and his agency execu- 
tives on taking chances. When he 
decided to fly some calfs over to start 
a new breed of cows in Greece, the 
idea was full of dynamite. It could 
have all blown right up in the Borden 
company's face. 

K&E's publicity operations also ex- 
tend into the realms of product intro- 
duction and promotion. Amazo hasn't 
had a big network program as yet; 
its use of radio advertising has been 
restricted to selective broadcasting. 
That doesn't stump the K&E boys. They 
had Boy Scouts, Lions and other lunch- 
eon clubs, men with and without dis- 
tinction, make Amazo in 30 seconds' 
time. The women's directors of sta- 



tions on which Amazo advertising was 
placed sent wires with a bottle of milk 
and a box of Amazo to their top fans. 
TV programs presented the dessert. 

In this case, broadcast advertising 
was part of the promotion. It was not 
strictly a case of promoting radio, but 
of radio promoting a product and an 
agency proving its ability to make use 
of radio's promotional scope. 

Kenyon & Eckhardt's operation is 
unique in radio publicity departments 
of advertising agencies. 

Another agency that does a top- 
flight job of press agentry for radio 
programs, although the publicity in 
some cases has not enabled the agency 
to hold an account or a program, is 
N. W. Ayer. Wauhillau LaHay heads 
the radio publicity department of this 
agency and can do either a creative 
routine job, as she does for the Bell 
Telephone Hour, or a flair job as she 
did for Rexall with Jimmy Durante. 
Miss LaHay's constant follow-through 
(she's an ex-radio editor herself and is 
assisted by Dorothy Doran, another 
ex-editor) has earned kudos from the 
men and women she services. 

Harry Rauch (Young & Rubicam) 
and Al Duranty (J. Walter Thompson) 
head publicity departments of two of 
radio's top agencies. Because Duranty 
has traveled and met most of the 
editors he services he stands high in 
their regard. Rauch for years has had 
top programs to handle and he does a 
good consumer-press public relations 
jobs. Both agencies are conservative, 
although Y&R's operation (Bureau of 
Industrial Relations) is an important 
part of the agency's service to clients. 

Many agencies hedge their respon- 
sibilities by hiring outside press agents 
to work under the supervision of the 
agency executive in charge of public 
relations. That frequently overcomes 
agency reluctance to take chances. The 
independent press agent takes the 
chance. If he comes through — the 
agency is sitting on top. If he fails, he's 
fired. It was the independent press 
agent's overstepping his authority that 
made all the difficulties. 

Publicity is not a science. Press 
agentry is not an art. 

For the record no one knows what 
it is, but it's the life blood of show- 
business, and a new product without a 
touch of the theater in its presentation 
just doesn't make the grade these days. 

Publicity, promotion, exploitation 
are three keystones not only to building 
a broadcast program, but also to insur- 
ing product success. + * + 



VACATION 

(Continued from page 34) 

to ten minutes and broadcast over 
WLAW. It's aired on the following 
Saturday each week. Don McNeill's 
ABC Breakfast Club is a five-a-week 
broadcast with a well established audi- 
ence over WLAW. Allen-A's choice of 
nine a.m. on Saturday was predicated 
on holding McNeill's audience with a 
similar type of program for ten minutes 
and reaching an extra audience via a 
newscast for the last five minutes. 

It's worked. After the first WLAW 
broadcast 20 couples called Allen-A 
for reservations. 

His current boadcasts are geared to 
Allen-A's being booked solid during 
1950. Other resorts around New Hamp- 
shire are reportedly 15-25% off of last 
year's bookings. Allen-A is doing all 
the business the resort can hold. 

It's Albee's sampling technique that 
has produced roundly out in Califor- 
nia. Each Sunday morning Bill Baldwin 
and Ruby Hunter interview guests who 
are having an out-of-doors breakfast 
at the Old Hearst Ranch in Pleasanton. 
The guests and Baldwin and Hunter 
play quiz games and generally have a 
good time. The following Sunday at 
9:30 a.m. the recording is broadcast 
over KSFO in San Francisco. There's 
solid evidence that plenty of vacation- 
ers from the Bay region go down to 
the ranch to be on the program. 

Sampling isn't the only productive 
means of selling the vacationer. The 
many programs originating at airports 
and union stations, however, are also 
forms of sampling and the thrill of 
hearing well-known personalities being 
greeted upon their arrival at different 
ports and stations have speeded mil- 
lions on their way — to the ticket win- 
dows. 

Very often it hasn't been a great 
radio station that has done the job. 
but a well-situated new outlet. One 
such is KXRX in San Jose. This 1000- 
watt station came to the air in 1948, 
not a propitious time for a new outlet, 
for business started sliding for broad- 
casters in late '48. Lake Tahoe is an 
all-year-'round resort which appeals to 
California vacationers. The Chamber 
of Commerce bought (or was sold) all 
the time on KXRX from midnight to 
6 a.m. All night long, the announcer 
sells the merits of the resorts in the 
central High Sierras. The audience dur- 
ing the wee hours is difficult to check. 
(Please turn to page 56) 



I AUGUST 1949 



m ksimt for 





Barnum had it ... so did other great 
showmen like Ziegfeld and George M. 
Cohan— the rare quality that made 
everything they put their hand to a 
tremendous popular success. 

Today, that same instinct reveals itself 
in all the programming triumphs NBC 
has scored since the birth of network 
television: 

top-rating shows in every category 
from drama to world news 

for the first half of this year, 

5 of the top 10 sponsored programs 

for nine consecutive months, more 
viewers for all programs together 
than any other network 

Better programs . . . bigger audiences . . . 
extra selling effectiveness— these are 
the solid advantages that are attracting 
the largest number of national advertisers 
to NBC, America's No. 1 Television 
Network. 



For the most sponsorable new 

shows in television, sec page 
following comparagraph. 



SUNDAY MONDAY P m TUESDAY I WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY Pm FRIDAY | SATURDAY 



R5 


■k 


BBC CBS Dumont nBC BBC CBS Dumant BBC " T BBC IBS oumant BBC BBC CBS Dumont BBC BBC CBS Duitiant BBC " T BBC CBS oumant BBC BBC CBS Dumont BBC 


,^J 




















































Ico^l 


— 


















































August 1949 


p%, 
















5:15 

5:30 
5:45 

-B- 

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U iii 111 A **AUUmA1iaJ 



.... is fine enough to become an NBC Television feature. 
Here are six that made the grade, each outstanding in its 
class, each ready to work wonders for a video-minded sponsor: 



THE BLACK ROBE 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT 







THEATRE OF THE MIND 



GARROWAY AT LARGE 



LIGHTS OUT 



BROADWAY SPOTLIGHT 



NBC TELEVISIO 





1 -research 



is first step in making a good film TV commercial. Campbell- 
Ewald's Leo Langlois is looking under the hood for pointers 



7 CPnntiflfT f°" ows * ne research. Leo Langlois explains to writer-prod i 



Maurer some of the material that should be included 



The TV station break 



Creative ability ranks as high as dollars in productivity 
of the short short commercial 



^ dfl jk It's possible to do a top 
WM l,\-'' selling job with a 20-sec- 
^^ ond TV film announce- 
ment. To such a degree has this been 
established that the ranks of broadcast 
advertisers who are using TV an- 
nouncements (1 minute) and station 
breaks (20 seconds or less) at the na- 
tional, regional selective and local-retail 
level are jumping daily. The field 
nevertheless has many uncharted and 
unexplored factors, and the answers 
are not to be found over-night. Despite 
this, there are some definite rules and 
findings in the field of TV announce- 
ments and breaks that serve, for the 
time being, as signposts for the TV 
advertiser and agency. 

The TV head of one of the country's 
leading ad agencies, an organization 
that places visual advertising for more 
than half-a-dozen clients, spoke his 
mind recently about one of the biggest 
pitfalls faced by the new advertiser in 
using TV announcements and breaks. 
Said the agencyman: "Research shows 
that the impact of a good visual com- 
mercial can be anywhere from two to 
ten times as great as a radio com- 



48 



mercial of similar length. You won't 
get results like that, however, if your 
TV commercials are merely radio 
commercials with badly-planned pic- 
tures." 

( Of interest to all TV-minded agen- 
cies and advertisers at this point is a 
word of caution from this same agency- 
man regarding length of TV breaks 
and announcements, more than 97% of 
which today are on film: "The adver- 
tiser who makes one-minute film spots 
as the backbone of a TV campaign may 
wind up with a lot of film on his hands 
that he can do nothing with. It's been 
tough for the last six months to place 
minute films, except in local programs 
or non-cable-serviced cities. Minute 
film spots should never be an adver" 
tiser's first thought about TV. He'll be 
much better off, and will get far better 
availabilities, if he sticks with shorter 
lengths, like 20-second film breaks.") 

It is an established fact that the 
planning and production of good TV 
breaks and announcements are increas- 
ingly specialized jobs for specialized 
people. Unlike radio campaigns at the 
same level (national selective and 



regional selective), the TV advertiser 
who decides to use TV breaks and 
announcements cannot plan in terms 
of "live" commercials, except for the 
few home -service or participation 
shows that take them. 

To keep quality consistent, as well 
as to avoid some expensive production 
charges that inevitably come with 
"live" breaks and announcements, the 
TV advertiser today is almost auto- 
matically required to do his TV sell- 
ing on film. Film breaks and announce- 
ments are roughly the equivalent of 
radio e.t.'s. They can be extremeh 
flexible, both as to costs and manner 
of presentation. Virtually every phase 
of radio e.t. production has a film 
counterpart, and at the same time TV 
films offer selling devices of their own. 
The TV-selective advertiser has at 
his disposal everything from full ani- 
mation and elaborate stop -motion 
(examples: BVD films, American Tob- 
acco "dancing cigarettes"), through 
trick opticals, musical jingles, and 
dramatized situations, to slide films, 
with or without sound, and silent films 

SPONSOR 



U 



h 




Hilt OnnforOnPO tulns on steam when Maurer makes pitch to Chev- 
II uUIIIClClllfC rolet ad director French and agency v. p. Case 



4 moviola check 



in production of Chevrolet station break. Maurer 
views each frame to judge way it will look on TV 



form to use, plus the details of pres- 
entation, is a job only for people who 
have either movie or TV backgrounds, 
and preferably both. 

The reason is simple. TV film users 
are, after all, in the motion picture 
business, whether they like it or not, 
and many of the basic rules of movie- 
making apply. Just where and how 
they apply cannot be judged by people 
who plan TV in terms of radio. What 
functions well in radio (or any other 
basic advertising medium, for that 
matter ) will not of necessity function 
in TV. Most TV advertisers and agency- 
men dismiss this simple precept as 
being so obvious it is hardly worth 
repeating. Still, the problem is there. 
It is no easy job to make radio-trained 
executives, who have thought in terms 
of the power of the spoken commercial 
word for years, realize just how 
little the spoken word means in terms 
of a film commercial. 

The problem usually arises first at 
agencies, whose TV staffs often have 
diplomatic word duels with radio ad- 
vertisers. Since few agencies maintain 
film staffs, and still fewer have regular 
film departments, the independent com- 
mercial producers of TV films, who 
make TV films for agencies and clients 
on a "piece work" basis, are up against 
the problem, too. A leading film-maker 
told sponsor: "You should see some of 
the scripts that come in here! We get 
shooting scripts that are so loaded 
with dialogue they look like radio 
copy. We get the other kind, too. 
Some agencies and clients come up 
with visual ideas that sound like Metro 
extravaganzas or Walt Disney in Tech- 
( Please turn to page 51) 



typical station breaks 




Amazo uses stop watch to prove speed in making 



Cinemart shows world of tomorrow for Tavern Beer 



Ford matches its beauty against beach sirens 



Pequot sheets show newlyweds making twin beds 




AUGUST 1949 



49 



tv trends 



Based upon the number of programs and 
announcements placed by sponsors on TV 
stations and indexed by Rorabaugh Report 
on Television Advertising. Business placed 
during average month June 1948-May 1949 
is used as base in each division of report. 



With this report TV Trends starts its second year. In place of the 
month base which was used during the past 12 months, the average 1 
ness placed per month during the year is now used as an unadjusted 1 
It's too early in the history of television to adjust trend lines for seas< 
variations. June network business was 257.8% of the average month 
sponsor's constant sample of ten cities network TV business was 88. 
higher than the average month. Selective TV business growth hasn't be 
rapid as network but local-retail has been even better. Radio-TV ad 
tising still leads the network and local-retail use of the medium 
Jewelry (watches) up in front of the selective TV placement. Beer 
Wine is also an important buyer of selective TV time. 



"TOTAL" AND TEN-CITY TRENDS 



JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY 



NETWORK 



257.8 



Gray area: total units of business 

1 00° o average 12 months June '48 -May '49 
i i i 

I Black area: constant base 
ot 10 cities, 15 stations 
— 



NATIONAL & REGIONAL SELECTIVE 



185.6 



9 



Gray area: total units of business 

100°b average 12 months June '48-May '49 

I Black area: constant base 
of 10 cities, 19 stations 
„■■■■■ ■ 



LOCAL RETAIL 



262.2 






4 



Gray area: total units of business 

100°/o- average 12 months June '48-May '49 

i i i i 

Black area: constant base 
of 10 cities, 19 stations 



BREAKDOWN OF TV BY BUSINESS CATEGORIES 



CATEGORY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT I NOV I DEC I JAN I FEB I MAR I APR 



NETWORK 



Automotive 



0.6 
26.2 



Clothing 



Radio TV & Appl 



Soaps ft Toiletries 



Tobacco 



14.6 



Beer & Wine 



Conf & Soft Drinks 




NATIONAL & REGIONAL SELECTIVE 



Radio TV & Appl 



Soaps & Toiletries 



Tobacco 



3.4 



Builders ft Sup 



Home Furn 




Home Furn 



Hotels I Rest 



Personal Services 



Radio TV ft Appl 



2.1 



5.4 



8.5 



25.5 




. 






THE TV STATION BREAK 

(Continued from page 49) 

nicolor. We can turn out a darn good 
20-second film break, but we can't give 
a client Mickey Mouse for a thousand 
dollars." 

There is considerable room for argu- 
ment about the "balance" of aural and 
visual impression factors in a TV film 
announcement or break. Theatrical 
film experts, like Robert J. Flaherty 
(Nanook, Louisiana Story, etc.) Josef 
Von Sternberg, and Rouben Mamoul- 
ian go all-out for the visual impression, 
feeling that a 90%-10% visual-aural 
balance is best. This applies, of course, 
to feature-length theatrical films where 
the audience's attention is directed at 
all times, without distractions, to the 
continuous story unfolding on the 
theater screen. Such thinking came as 
a counter-reaction to the early days of 
sound movies, when the newly-perfected 
soundtracks were so laden with dia- 
logue that audiences grew restless and 
bored. 

TV is something else again. There 
is one school of thought, which hap- 
pens to be that of the majority, which 
says that the balance should be pri- 



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marily visual. A typical film-wise 
agency executive, Campbell -Ewald's 
v.p. Winslow Case, sums up the aver- 
age reaction: "We feel that 85% of 
the selling impulse can be channeled 
through the eye. That means that with 
TV films you can get away from stri- 
dent selling and still be effective." 

The other school believes that an 
85%-15% visual-aural balance ( a fig- 
ure almost exactly the same as Govern- 
ment findings with military-instruction 
films) may miss the boat if placed 
on a national selective basis. The 
theory goes something like this: TV 
film spots come at a time when the 
viewing audience is enjoying a "seven- 
th-inning stretch" between programs. 
Viewers are walking around the room, 
refilling glasses, tuning their sets, and 
generally relaxing. Therefore, TV spots 
must also have strong "aural sell" to 
make a point when the audience's 
viewing attention is wandering. 

A sponsor survey of leading agen- 
cies and film-makers showed clearly 
that there is no absolute answer to 
the problem. The nearest thing to a 
rule-of-thumb came from an agency 
film man, whose job it is to adapt 
ideas from over-all advertising camp- 
aigns to visual film announcements. 
Said he: "The best way to sell a prod- 
uct or service by film breaks is first 
of all to start a film with a strong atten- 
tion-getting gimmick, like a jingle and 
trick animation. Once the audience's 
attention is yours, then you can go to 
work. The aural-visual balance will 
then vary with the type of selling to 
be done, and the nature of the product. 
A product whose selling points require 
more explanation — a linotype, for in- 
stance — will need more aural selling 
than one with a high visual appeal. 
The basic approach should be from the 
visual angle, with the spoken word act- 
ing as a supplement." 

Selling ideas in TV film commercials 
must flow smoothly from idea to idea, 
with the audience accepting each as 
being believable. To do this, full ad- 
vantage must be taken of the fact that 
TV is a visual medium. Failure to do 
this can cause some unpleasant results. 
A series of one-minute films spots made 
recently for the Ice Cream Novelties 
Company ( not filmed, as reported in 
the trade press, by the present agency, 
Monroe Greenthal. but by the previous 
agency which no longer has the ae- 
count) is a good example. Buried deep 
m the film announcement was a pre- 
mium offer for a sweat shirt, obtain 




LOS ANGELES .-"Let's have more of 
Bergen," said a card we got the other 
day. Our Southern California viewers 
had seen Edgar Bergen in his first TV 
appearance since retiring from radio . . . 
of course, on KTTV. Top drawer talent 
has always been part of our strong lo- 
cally-produced shows here. Hollywood is 
a vast reservoir of singers, dancers, actors 
— gifted entertainers — and we have been 
drawing on all these people to program 
bright, refreshing television. For instance, 
last week such well-known names as Alan 
Mowbray, Sonny Tufts, Billy Burke, Vin- 
cent Price, Marjorie Reynolds and others 
appeared on regularly-scheduled KTTV 
shows. Then the New York Chevrolet 
dealers bought our "Pantomime Quiz," 
the first Hollywood production to break 
into the Manhattan market. From CBS- 
TV we have Toast of the Town, Fred 
Waring, Arthur Godfrey and more. The 
point is we're offering our viewers not 
only high-rated network shows . . . our 
local shows are loaded with talent, pro- 
duction know-how, and audience pulling 
power. 

LIKE KIDS, we boast of our "parents" 
I (because they can be boasted about.) 
KTTV is 51% owned by the Los Angeles 
Times and 49</r by CBS. No question 
in anybody's mind that the Times is 
Southern California's leading newspaper. 
And CBS programs certainly have been 
stealing the ratings. That gives us the 
best in network shows . . . plus the strong 
right arm of this area's greatest news- 
paper. So we're part of a sound, expand- 
ing local picture that also finds us as 
CBS's Hollywood TV station. 

BANKERS are supposed to have steely 
eyes, at least when asked to part with 
money. When the 35-branch Citizen's 
Bank started the Vienna Philharmonic 
series over KTTV recently, we thought 
that television certainly had arrived. Now 
along comes the world's largest bank. 
Bank of America, and starts "Kieran's 
Kaleidoscope" with us on Sundays. You're 
not only in good company on KTTV, but 
in company that knows how to look at a 
buck. 

RADIO SALES knows our latest avail- 
abilities. Ask them and get the usual 
speedy reply. 



KTTV 



TIMIS »CB$ TUEVISIGN 



LOS ANGELES 



I AUGUST 1949 



51 



NOW! Modern, Comprehensive TV "Staging" plus 

NEW TV REVENUE from Pattern Time 

with the UR #41 

TELOP 

This most versatile telecasting 
optical projector enables dual pro- 
jection with any desired optical 
dissolve under exact control. 

The accessory STAGE NUMBER I 
odds three functions separately or 
simultaneously: a) teletype news 
strip, b) vertical roll strip and c) 
revolving stage for small objects. 

The TELOP, used with TV film cam- 
eras, permits instant fading of one 
object to another, change by lap 
dissolve or by superimposing. 
Widest latitude is given program 
directors for maximum visual 
interest and increased TV station 
income. 

for lull delai/i «rife for Bulletin T 1 01 

GRAY RESEARCH 

and Development Co., Inc. 
16 Arbor St., Hartford 1/ Conn. 




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Canada ... 150 

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able for product wrappers. The films 
were shown on TV in the East, 
Chicago, and the West Coast. The pre- 
mium failed to pull. The reason: men- 
tion of the premium was purely aural. 
At no time was the premium show 
visual. Also, the soundtrack was work- 
ing at cross-purposes with the picture, 
since one thing was shown and another 
thing was talked about. The offer laid 
an egg. since the visual element won 
out. Ice Cream Novelties will continue 
to use TV, despite rumors to the con- 
trary, but the Greenthal agency will be 
careful not to repeat the mistakes of the 
previous agency. 

It takes time, money, brains, and 
effort to make a good TV film break 
or announcement. Already, in the 
short and rapid growth of national 
and regional selective TV, it has been 
amply demonstrated that the eclectic 
methods of Hollywood B-pictures — 
that is. taking bits and pieces of suc- 
cessful movies and putting them to- 
gether to make a "new" story — merely 
prove the adage about one man's meat 
being another man's poison. Borrow- 
ing film ideas from other commercials, 
merely to save time or to cover up for 
lack of originality, makes no more 
sense, film men agree, than trying to 
build a house in ten different archi- 
tectural styles. The most effective film 
breaks and announcements are de- 
signed from the original idea to final 
editing as a custom job for the particu- 
lar product. Any short-cuts impair the 
over-all effectiveness of the commercial. 

A fairly good series of, say, six 20- 
second radio e.t. station breaks can be 
made, from idea to final pressing, in a 
week or two. Good ones have been 
made in less. A good TV film-break 
series will take as long as six months 
from the time the idea first strikes an 
agency TV man to the time it is first 
shown on the air. The average time to 
make a good series of films will run 
somewhere between five and ten weeks, 
and unit costs will range between $100- 
$1000 for silent film "and $1000-$10,- 
000 for sound-on-film jobs. 

A study of the time elements involved 
in making a typical film break-and- 
announcement series can be very re- 
vealing. One such study was made 
recentlv by the Campbell-Ewald agency . 
which supervises the making of TV 
film breaks and announcements for two 
blue-chip accounts. Chevrolet Division 
of General Motors and the Chevrolet 
Dealers Association. No newcomer to 
film-making. Chevrolet has been selling 



52 



SPONSOR 



cars by theatrical ''Minute Movies" 
since the late 1920's. The agency has 
had the account even longer. The 
Chevrolet TV film commercials are 
simple, effective, and typical of good 
TV film-making. 

Ideas for new Chevrolet film series 
(a new series is made every six months 
or so; new prints are issued about 
once a month as they wear out) are 
hatched in a conference with Camp- 
bell-Ewald's TV head, v.p. Win Case, 
TV department head Leo Langlois, 
and writer-producer Ray Maurer. The 
ideas are basically adaptions of 
"themes" from Chevrolet's national 
advertising in other media. A second 
conference, after the idea has cooled 
a bit, will be called with the same 
men, plus the account executives. Three 
of four weeks of work follow the 
approval of the basic idea by Chevrolet, 
during which the idea takes shape, 
with the aid of story-board drawings, 
sketches, etc. Then, the idea goes to 
Maurer and his department for the 
actual writing. The script, generally 
three or four pages per film, goes back 
for additional conferences, then back 
to the writer for final revisions. Time 
elasped so far is about six weeks. 

The film-makers are then called into 
the act, in this case Archer Produc- 
tions. The script is discussed, the 
agency listens to any suggestions from 
the producer, and a shooting schedule 
is mapped out. A week or so of shoot- 
ing for a short series, using sound 
stages if the film has a dramatic bit, 
and silent film if narration is to be 
added later, comes next. Location 
shooting, virtually called for with an 
outdoor product such as a Chevrolet, 
will add an average of three more 
days to the time expenditure per spot. 
(Musical scoring may be done during 
these days, but most often it awaits 
the final editing, when it is done in 
special studios.) 

In both planning and shooting Chev- 
rolet films, agencymen and film-makers 
avoid any unexpected climaxes, un- 
supported by other high points in the 
film commercial. This lengthens the 
usable life of a film commercial, since 
audiences would otherwise tire of it 
too quickly. 

Once the final shooting is completed, 
anywhere from one to three weeks 
after it started, there must be several 
days of integrating the score and nar- 
ration into the finished product, as well 
as last-minute viewing and editing. 
The TV film break or announcement 



(the actual length, 20 seconds or 60 
seconds, does not make much differ- 
ence) is now ready for showing on the 
visual air. 

In terms of personnel, the typical 
Chevrolet film break or announcement 
has required the services of five Camp- 
bell-Ewald men, eight to 12 men from 
Archer Productions, a narrator, five 
or six recording and editing technicians 
for music and commentary integration, 
two music writers for the score, and 
a chorus to sing it. In terms of man- 
hours of work, one Chevrolet TV film 
takes approximately 550-600 such 
hours. This is five or six times the 
number of man-hours required to make 
a similar-length radio e.t., even with 
the fanciest of radio production. 

There are several other factors in 
the making and placing of TV film 
breaks and announcements, the results 
of experience with the medium by a 
long list of visual advertisers, that 
should be borne in mind. 

For one thing, TV research has 
shown that an irritating TV film I one 
full of over-long repetition or clumsy 
production) creates only memorability 
for a product, and not necessarily the 
desire to buy it. TV's heightened im- 
pact makes "irritant" advertising via 
TV breaks and announcements a dan- 
gerous selling device, one that can all 
too easily backfire on the seller. The 
other extreme, the overly-cute com- 
mercial, can also lose viewer-interest 
in a hurry. Selling should be fairly 
straight, and should strive for a fresh 
approach in order to bring a TV adver- 
tiser the best returns for his investment, 
as well as to make best use of the 
visual element of the medium. Since 
TV is an intimate, living-room medium, 
the approach should be along the same 
lines. Theatrics, insincerity, and the 
third-person approach just don't work. 

There is a purely academic argu- 
ment that has waxed hot at times 
among TV men. Insiders say that it 
is, more than anything else, a tempest 
in a teapot. The argument revolves 
around the problem of producing TV 
films that are equally effective on both 
large and small TV viewing screens. 
Industry opinion today is generally 
that this is one of those things that 
takes care of itself with a good TV 
film. If long shots, too-rapid scene 
changes, small print that runs to the 
edges of the screen, lack of contrast, 
and involved sales messages are avoid- 
ed, there should be little trouble. 

A somewhat similar argument is 



Carl does it 
the hard way! 




Maybe when some station man- 
agers get new business, their eyes 
light up like pinball machines, and 
they start figuring how much money 
they're going to make . . . then let 
their second assistant stooge pick 
out some hand-me-down availabili- 
ties. 

But not Carl! 

He has to do it the hard way! 
The way he goes through the sched- 
ule, you'd think he was Mr. Tiffany 
himself picking out diamonds. 

Carl handpicks the best possible 
time to run your spots whether you 
have a one-time shot or a year's 
schedule. 

No wonder national advertisers 
have such confidence in Carl to see 
that their goods move up here in our 
neck of the woods. Carl isn't just 
satisfied to tell the folks over the 
air about your products, he spends 
his own dough to help promote your 
show with newspaper ads, direct 
mail and store displays to boot. 

You can't go wrong if you use 
WDSM (Duluth - Superior) and 
WEVE (the Iron Range) in com- 
bination to tell your sales story. 
And best of all, these 2 ABC sta- 
tions can be bought in combination 
for the price of ONE Duluth sta- 
tion! 

WDSM's and WEVE's signals 
may not be too clear in Washington, 
but it certainly gets home up here 
in the north country. 

Now, don't just take our word for 
it . . . demand proof ... be a tough 
time-buyer and ask to know why 
WDSM and WEVE is the best buy 
. . . your nearest Free & Peters man 
has the whole story on it. 



I AUGUST 1949 



53 



ON THE DIAL 



IN LISTENING 



IN NETWORK 



WSJS 

LEADS 



DAY AND NIGHT 



NORTH CAROLINA'S 

RICHTRI-CITY 

MARKET 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 



(J) WINSTON-SALEM (£) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

AFFILIATE 

Represented by 

HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



sometimes made over the relative 
merits of 35-mm and 16-mm film. This 
is not so much the question of whether 
10 or 35 gives hetter results on a TV 
set, since less than half-a-dozen TV 
stations in the country can afford the 
expense ( ahout $15,0001 of a 35-mm 
projection system. It revolves, rather, 
ahout whether shooting on 35-mm and 
then making reduction prints to 16-mm 
is better than shooting on 16-mm to be- 
gin with. Both silent and sound-on-film 
movies can be made either way, al- 
though not all animation and stop-mo- 
tion studios are geared to handle 16-mm 
during shooting. Actually, shooting on 
35-mm is said to give better quality 
when reduced on a special printing 
system to 16-mm than straight 16. It is 
also much more expensive, and equip- 
ment is much larger and more cumber- 
some. If an advertiser is counting pen- 
nies, straight 16-mm is usually the 
answer. 

The question of length is one that 
is being dictated, not by research, but 
largely by the problems of TV time- 
buying today. The growth of TV net- 
work programing, as well as local TV 
programing, has cut into the number of 
possible one-minute availabilities. 
Timebuyers today find one-minute 
almost unobtainable in Class-A time. 
TV has not as yet developed any wide- 
spread formula that compares with 
radios disk-jockey and participation 
periods, into which one-minute e.t. 
spots can be slotted. The nearest 
thing to it has been home-service 
shows, like DuMont's Kathi Norris 
program, and broken-up feature films, 
such as Frontier Playhouse, on WFIL- 
TV, Philadelphia. The home-service 
shows usuallv feature live commercials; 
the feature-film shows film announce- 
ments. 

These are merely exceptions, rather 
than the rule. The wise TV advertiser 
today thinks first in terms of 20-second 
film breaks, or possibly 8-10-second 
"station identification" service an- 
nouncements, such as the time breaks 
of Bulova and Bond Bread. 

The rapid growth of TV has brought 
about another problem — shipping and 
storing TV films. The handling of 
films is much tougher than the han- 
dling of radio e.t.'s, most of which are 
easily routed, scheduled, and shipped 
by agencies or recording companies. 
Film announcements and breaks wear 
out faster then vinylite recordings, and 
have to be replaced more often. I A 
20-second film break, used once-weeklv. 
wears out in about four months. I 



Until recently, there was no answer. 
The situation, however, is changing. 
One firm, Modern Talking Picture 
Service, a non-theatrical film distribu- 
tion firm, has already signed contracts 
with BBD&O, Young & Rubicam, J. 
Walter Thompson, and Biow to route 
film programs, breaks, and announce- 
ments to the nearly four-score TV sta- 
tions in the country. Even though 16- 
mm films do not require the fire-proof 
film vaults of 35-mm, keeping track 
of where they are during a national 
selective TV campaign has, in recent 
months, become a major problem. If 
the experiment with Modern works out, 
the problem may be eased for the in- 
dustry. 

While sponsor does not feel that the 
information contained in this report 
will answer every single question that 
might be raised by an advertiser who 
plans to use TV film breaks and an- 
nouncements, the findings, which re- 
present the current thinking of most 
industry experts, should offer mar/ 
basic considerations in the handling of 
visual advertising this fall. * * « 



WORR» ED 
ABOUT 

YOUR 

LIFE 

SPANN (Ky-)? 

If your ulcers ^^rfS 

sales in places i 
For heaHh>appmes SeLouisv . le 

rU yinKentucW^ 

Trading /'«* - * cky and 

you need. »•» u *hat 

Indiana counties g dayg a 

the rest of tne 

?_~ Kurt 



life with w~ 




54 



SPONSOR 



FARM COMMERCIALS 

(Continued from page 31 ) 



from the farmer's point of view. Al- 
though the commercial used for 
Phillips ()(> gasoline was worded, "City 
driving needs a quick-starting gasoline 
on these cold, icy mornings," it is not 
too far-fetched to assume that the 
rural male would draw his own con- 
clusions of the importance of quick- 
starting gasoline on cold, icy mornings 
on the farm. 

The Hotpoint electrical-product com- 
mercials were slanted in terms of "elec- 
trical kitchens" in city homes. Never- 
theless, farm women use electrical 
appliances, too. One farm panel met 
in a farm home which, decoratively 
speaking, was exceedingly bare. The 
kitchen, however, was proudly equip- 
ped with super deluxe home freezer, a 
top-priced electrical range, an Elec- 
trolux cleaner, electrical water pump. 
Mixmaster, and the roof was topped 
with a special FM antenna. 

It can be seen that farm men and 
women can be interested in so-called 
city products. The reverse is seldom 
true. Skelly 2-4-D is used for spray- 
ing of commercial crops. The product 
has no use for the urban dweller. The 
commercial should have great appeal 
for the farmer. The PGR test ranked 
it 11, just ahead in interest to farm 
men of Calumet baking powder. The 
product by itself cannot rouse the 
listening interest. 

The product by itself can't even 
determine the relative interest of each 
sex in a commercial. Farm women 
placed 2-4-D commercials first among 
rural-appeal air advertisements. The 
farm men, it may be recalled, placed 
it next to last. Farm men gave the 
electrical kitchen (Hotpoint) com- 
mercials third place. 

Hick or hillbilly commercials do 
not appeal to farmers. Farm men placed 
the straight Calumet commercial fifth, 
but ranked the "character" approach to 
the product last. 

While the format of the commercials 
was of primary importance, if the 
reactions of these several hundred 
respondents are accepted as typical, it 
is also important to note that the cor- 
relation between farm women and city 
women, and farm men and city men 
is very high. Thus, it appears the 
skirted contingent was attracted by 
the same things, and that blue-jeaned 
or linen-suited men were similiar in 
their commercial listening reactions. 

I AUGUST 1949 



One thing is very important — com- 
mercials alone do not, as presently 
written and presented, do a selling job 
to the rural audience. Thus, it's vital 
that advertising addressed to rural 
audiences be spotted in programs with 
known farm audiences. 

As indicated in sponsor's series on 
farm programing, most commercials 
hit their highest impact when they're 
handled by farm commentators or the 
farm directors of stations. While the 
limited sample used for the SPONSOR- 
University of Oklahoma study can't 



be taken as conclusive evidence that 
all rural commercials are not written 
or delivered in such a mariner as to 
rouse the listening audience to whom 
they are addressed, the report does 
indicate that something must be done 
to make them more effective. Out of 
context, without the benefit of program- 
ing, they don't deliver true impact. 

It's well apparent that farm stations 
and farm programs deliver audiences 
ready to be sold. 

The commercials do not appear to 
do their job. * * + 



Oklahoma City's Only I 50,000 Watt Station 



REPRESENTED BY 



?* ^*"r Wo, " d rou *» 

safes. '** -n OMah 

Company, Ch, c . , • ° nn ° ae 'e ed 

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efforf Wos <**• The reiu „ n J and SELLING 

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te ' »■ or Avp „ ' 0nn=Oe feed 

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• J - Bernard 
Gene '°< Manager 



Outlet for the Columbia Broadcasting Syster 



55 



VACATION 

(Continued from page 41) 

It's composed of night workers, and 
drivers. The Lake Tahoe C. of C. 
wanted to see if they could find out if 
there was a real resort audience being 
reached. They offered information 
about Lake Tahoe and a key chain. 
Result was 75 inquiries daily until the 
key chains were exhausted. What was 
more important, a high percentage of 
the mail requested specific information, 
rates, and availabilities. It came not 
only from local people in the San Jose 
area but Easterners without fixed 
schedules on automobile vacations. 

Like Tahoe, Ruidoso, New Mexico, 
with a population of 2000 and fewer 
than 900 voters, wanted to attract tour- 
ists and vacationers to its little town. 
There was money to be spent — and an 
average temperature of 61 degrees to 
sell. There was the perpetual snow- 
crown of Sierra Blanca and the sun- 
swept fertile valley beyond. 

Instead of a small station on the 
milk run, Ruidoso chose WOAI in 
San Antonio for their $7500 cam- 
paign. No sampling, just selective an- 
nouncements — announcement times se- 
lected by the Halff station as best 



suited for their job. Ruidoso is grow- 
ing. 

Newspaper resort advertising de- 
pends for support on its ability to pull 
requests for leaflets, booklets, etc. 
Broadcast advertising for many years 
was disinterested in this formula of 
proving effectiveness. Of late, this dis- 
interest has dropped and mail response 
to commercial offers is used by ad- 
vertisers as indication of listeners. 
This fact generally has not been 
stressed to resort and travel advertisers. 
Only a few have made the test. Lindsey 
Spight, v.p. of the John Blair station 
representative organization, recently 
admitted to a group of Western travel 
agents that "radio is greatly at fault for 
not more forcefully telling Western 
travel directors and agencies how radio 
can pull inquiries for pictorial litera- 
ture." 

As proof of how effective broadcast 
advertising can be in getting inquiries, 
Spight quoted the results of two 50 
word announcements 7 a.m. on KIRO, 
Seattle. These two announcements, cost- 
ing $26.00 each of a small pictorial 
booklet of scenic highlights of Seattle 
drew 3752 requests from 27 counties 
in Washington and 11 counties in Cali- 
fornia. Idaho. Montana, British Colum- 



Yes 



KFYR 



550 KC 5000 WATTS 

NBC AFFILIATE 
BISMARCK. NO. DAKOTA 



comes in loud and clear in a larger area 
than any other station in the U. S. A.* 




•ASK ANY JOHN BLAIR MAN TO PROVE IT. 



bia. Nevada and even Alaska. Cost was 
slightly less than one and a half cents 
per inquiry. 

Resort and travel advertising on the 
air takes in many forms. Unique in 
many ways are the Ed Craney Pacific 
Northwest Playground magazines dis" 
tributed by the Craney "Z" stations 
and "XL" stations throughout the 
Northwest. They are an involved pro- 
motion with money coming from sev- 
eral sources. What it all adds up to, is 
increased travel in the area served by 
the Playground magazines, more broad- 
cast advertising, and more resort busi- 
ness for the advertisers on the air and 
in the magazines. 

Railroads have been using radio 
mostly for institutional advertising like 
the Railroad Hour, but "special" trains 
have found that broadcasting books 
them solidly. Ski trains, cycle trains, 
show trains, and a host of other spe- 
cials have filled up overnight after a 
broadcast announcement. 

An exception to the absence of 
proved results is a Continental Santa Fe 
Trailways experience. To offset a busi- 
ness decline of 7.8% in the first half 
of 1948, the Trailways turned on ad- 
vertising pressure and the second half 
of 1948 showed an increase of 16% 
over the similar period in 1947. The 
pressure was concentrated for the most 
part on broadcast advertising. 

Each year, tight or loose consumer 
dollar, more money is being spent on 
leisuretime travel, winter and summer 
vacationing. The standard means of 
reaching that dollar are still effective. 
The big point, however, is that the 
breaking with tradition, using broad- 
cast advertising, pays even bigger divi- 
dends. 

. . . even if it isn't paid advertising, 
the announcement that "this broadcast 
comes to you from Hawaii" has 
brought millions to the Islands. * * * 



DEALER CO-OP $ 

(Continued from page 27) 

Dealers in area A were given a dis- 
count of 50 and ten, plus cooperative 
advertising allowance of 5% of their 
total purchases on a 50-50 basis. 

Area B dealers, in addition to their 
normal discount of 50 and ten, were 
given, in lieu of the co-op allowance, 
a 10% uncontrolled allowance "for 
advertising." (This 50 and ten worked 
out to about M>.of 1% less than re- 
ceived by area A dealers.) 

The financial arrangement covered a 



56 



SPONSOR 



three-month period. Dealer advertising 
was checked for another three months 
(six months altogether). Correlation 
of the data required about three months 
more. The effect on dealer advertising 
was that those dealers in area A, where 
the cooperative program was in effect, 
averaged placing four times more ad- 
vertising for the radio line than their 
brothers in test area B. 

The reasoning of area A dealers, as 
brought out in a follow-up check, 
boiled down to their feeling that it 
would be foolish not to follow through 
on the impact of the co-op advertising, 
thus getting more out of both cooper- 
ative and advertising paid for wholly 
by themselves. 

This same company found that when 
they tried to persuade dealers directly 
to use their own prepared copy for 
radio and other media, dealers placed 
less advertising. When the company 
adopted the approach of showing deal- 
ers how and why their carefully- 
worked-out suggestions could produce 
more business, most dealers got the 
point. 

Such organizations as AVCO's Cros- 
ley Division and RCA's Victor Division 
make their distributors the first line 
of operation in administering their 
local programs. Dealers put in their re- 
quests for radio and other advertising 
through the distributor, who sends it 
along with recommendation pro or con. 

Bills also clear first through the 
distributor before going on to the 
manufacturer for final checking before 
payment. An alert distributor who 
knows the media in his area will sel- 
dom be fooled by attempts to chisel 
through double invoicing, with one 
rate to the outlet and a higher rate to 
the manufacturer. While Crosley pro- 
vides copy and other aids, distributors 
are allowed considerable leeway in ap- 
proving alternate or modified commer- 
cials in order to make the most of local 
conditions. 

For RCA-Victor radio and television 
products, the advertising department 
at Camden, N. J., has a Cooperative 
Advertising Group of about a dozen 
people who do nothing but check bills 
and proof of publication or broadcast. 
For proof that radio commercials were 
broadcast, notarized copies of the 
script are accepted. 

Announcements, either live or trans- 
cribed, form the overwhelming bulk 
of approved radio advertising. In many 
cases the e.t.'s are furnished free to 
local outlets by the factory, and in al- 
most all cases scripts are furnished 



without cost. 

A growing number of firms, how- 
ever, will allow use of a program if it 
is first approved by the factory. The 
split of costs (usually 50-50) doesn't 
differ from that of announcements. 
The type of manufacturer who ap- 
proves radio programs for cooperative 
advertising follows no set classification. 
Among those who do, for example, are 
The Foy Paint Company, Inc., Cincin- 
nati; A. Sagner's Sons, Inc., Balti- 
more (Northcool suits); Amana So- 
ciety, Refrigeration Division, Amana, 
Iowa; Nash Motors, Detroit; Arm- 
strong Rubber Company, West Haven, 
Conn, (for tires and tubes) ; General 
Electric Co., Appliances and Mer- 
chanise Dept., Bridgeport, Conn., etc. 

Sometimes the manufacturer's allow- 
ance on a product is greater than 50%. 
GE, for example assumes 75% of the 
split on automatic blankets and vacuum 
cleaners. Crosley assumes 75% on 
radios. 

Percentages of billings that acrue 
to the co-op fund vary with the item. 
On home appliances it seldom is higher 
than 3%. For items in a cosmetic line 
the percentage may run two or three 
times higher. Colonial Dames, Inc., 
Hollywood, for example, allows 8%% 
of an account's net purchases, on a 
50-50 basis, for all media combined. 

Whatever the nature of the deal, the 
end result hoped for is to get more 
people into stores where they can be 
sold. It has been argued that the 
"where to buy it" theme is virtually 
useless in all but large metropolitan 
centers because people "already know" 
where to go. This reasoning forgets 
the tremendously expanded shopping 
range that modern transportation 
makes possible. In many areas people 
think nothing of traveling as much as 
a hundred miles for a shopping tour. 
The theory that people don't need to 
be told where to buy is a peculiarly 
"big-city" feeling. 

One school of thought would limit 
cooperative deals to those in which the 
manufacturer exercises complete con- 
trol of copy, themes, schedule and 
media. Outlets participating would 
have their names and locations printed, 
and they would pay for that privilege. 

While there is nothing wrong with 
this practice as one type of handling, 
to limit all cooperative programs to 
this general pattern runs smack up 
against human nature. The typical lo- 
cal outlet, large or small, has consider- 
able pride in his organization. Right 
or wrong, he likes to feel that sales in 



CBS 



in 



MAINE 
now 

WGUY 



Bangor 



and 



WGAN 

Portland 

WGUY becomes affiliated with the Col- 
umbia Broadcasting System August 1st. 

WGAN & WGUY now bring CBS pro- 
grams and sponsors' messages to listen- 
ers whose incomes represent over 93% 
of the effective buying power in Maine. 

NATIONAL ADVERTISERS, by plac 
ing one order can reach this productive 
market less expensively and more eco- 
nomically than ever before. 

PROMOTION . . . Yes, WGAN & 
WGUY will continue a regular and two- 
fisted promotion schedule in the five 
Guy Gannett newspapers of Maine. 

Guy Gannett 
Broadcasting System 



WGAN 
WGUY 



5000 Watts 

• 560 KC 
Portland 

250 Watts 

• 1450 KC 

Bangor 



Station Representative 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



I AUGUST 1949 



57 



J' m ll/orking, . . 

as a key broadcast sales execu- 
tive with a national N. Y. 
radio concern. My record as 
an "idea man" and aggressive 
salesman is unique . . . (and 
subject to inspection). 

3 li be available 

September 1-15, 1949. 



If you have an important 
sales assignment open, and 
want a man who can show 
you how to make profits, I'm 
interested in telling you why 
I might be just the man you 
are looking for. 



AM PLANNING 

Have built and operated 
profitable radio stations 

AM OPERATIONS 

Familiar with all phases of 
station operations, and 
agency radio depts. 

AM MANAGEMENT 

Successful record as Sales 
Manager. 



TV 



Good basic knowledge of TV 
sales, operations, and man- 
agement. 



Box 72 

SPONSOR 

40 W. 52nd St., New York 19, N. Y. 



his territory depend in part on his 
efforts. He doesn't like to be told every- 
thing he has to do. Intelligent or not. 
that's the way he is. 

The most successful cooperative ar- 
rangements are those in which the 
manufacturer's lor distributors', as the 
case may be) advertising or sales pro- 
motion department wins the coopera- 
tion of local outlets to a proved plan 
of operation — and keeps him sold. 



RADIO AUDIENCE: 1949 

(Continued from page 23) 

all reveal that out-of-the-home listening 
is amazing. Portable radio receivers 
have cut millions loose from the home 
when they want to wander and listen. 
Sales of portable receivers and three" 
way receivers ( battery, AC and DC 
current) continue to lead all radio set 
sales during June, July, and August 
and the sales of batteries for these re- 
ceivers indicate that they are in con- 
stant use both in and out of the city. 

There is a feeling that listening per 
radio home is on the decline. The re- 
verse is true. According to A. C. Niel- 
sen, average daily listening per home 
was four hours and 13 minutes in 
1943. four hours and 35 minutes in 
1916. and five hours and two minutes 
in 1949. Even in telephone homes 
alone, and reporting upon only one 
set in each home, listening has been 
consistently up, as reported by the C. E. 
Hooper organization. Average daytime 
program popularity rating for the first 
seven months show only two months 
that are lower than 1948. 

Daytime Average Hooperatings 
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. Jun. July 

1949 5.0 5.3 5.0 4.8 4.3 4.3 4.0 

1948 4.7 5.3 5.3 4.8 4.7 4.1 3.8 



In June and July, total set-in-use 
figures reported by Hooper for his 36 
cities were up. June increased from 
16.3'/; in 1948 to 16.8 in 1949. July 
increased from 14.9% in 1948 to 
15.7% in 1949. 

First half of July showed evening 
sets-in-use figures also increased from 
18.5% in 1948 to 19.6 in 1949. 

Because it is presumed that radio 
listening is a dead dodo, once tele- 
vision enters the home, Nielsen's 
figures for listening in the TV homes 
which he covers I he is endeavoring to 
have his Audimeters placed so that his 
reports are representative of the num- 
ber of radio-only homes and radio-TV 
homes in the U. S. ) show that listening 
per day is two hours and 42 minutes 
and viewing three hours and 59 min- 
utes. While radio listening in TV 
homes is less than half of what it is in 
a non-TV home, it is not a dead duck. 
The combined listening and viewing 
is one hour and 39 minutes more per 
dav than in a radio-only home. 

The growth of non-network radio 
has been so rapid in the past few years 
that there may be an impression that 
network is shrinking. It isn't. The 
average network advertiser in 1949 
is delivering his sales messages to 18% 
more homes than he did two years ago. 

Homes Reached Per Average Network Broadcast 

January 1949 3,999,000 

January 1947 3,400,000 

During the same period the cost per 
thousand homes for the average net- 
work broadcast dropped from $1.89 
to $1.71. This includes time and talent, 
as estimated by A. C. Nielsen. 

The number of listeners to the com- 
mercial sections of network broadcasts 
were 913 per dollar invested for an 
average evening program and 1460 per 
dollar for the average daytime program. 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



V. S. BECKER 
PRODUCTIONS 

Producers of television and radio pack- 
age shows. Representing talent of dis- 
tinction. 
562-5th Ave., New York Luxemberg 2-1040 



Directory Rates 
on request 



If 'J 1 I I I I THE0*#5TATIOI 

U % 'II ™ AT COVER5 BOTH 
"■ H ||n| MM HALVES OF THE 

||| I |f ff "vnNCOuveRRRGfl 



58 



SPONSOR 



hese figures are not program audi- 
nce figures but figures for the audi- 
nce for commercial sections of the 
trograms. 

Lest these figures appear to short 
hange the independent non-network 
tations, the size of their audience can 
>est be appreciated by the fact that on 
- July 1949 from six to ten p.m.. the 
ion-network stations' shares of audi- 
•nce in the 36 cities covered by the 
looper Program Popularity Ratings 
an like this: 



lme . 
;hare 
"ime 
Ihare 
Time . 
lhare 



1 July 1949 
Non-network share of audience 

6-6:15 6:15-6:30 6:30-6:45 

38.4% 45.4% 45.7% 

6:45-7 7-7:45 7:15-7:30 

37.7'; 45.4% 38.0% 

7:30-7:45 7:45-8 8-8:15 

36.4% 27.6'; 23.9% 

8:30-8:45 8:45-9 

27.3% 23.2% 

9:15-9:30 9:30-9:45 

10.2 r 14.0' t 



"im« 8:15-8:30 

;hare 17.2' v 

Time 9-9:15 

ihare 17.7% 



The increase in the number of in- 
dependent stations has brought into 
>eing stations with vertical program- 
ng. stations that are directing their 
jrograming to specific segments of the 
ludience rather than the entire audi" 
;nce. This means bigger and better 
audiences, for it means service for 
ireat sections of the public which 
broadcasting has been unable to reach 
before. 

Every dimension of radio is ex- 
panding. The competition of television 
has sharpened the programing of all 
radio. In its fight for ears, it's building 
new and greater audiences. 

There are more radio homes. 

There are more radio receivers in 
radio homes. 

There is more listening in each radio 
home. 

More people are listening in each 
radio home. 

That is U. S. Radio, 1949. 



LAUNDRY LESSON 

(Continued on page 25) 

a campaign is started, the most im- 
portant thing an agency must do is 
continually merchandise the campaign 
back to the individual members . . . 
let them know exactly how it's work- 
ing, and what good it is doing them." 
With the boom war days a thing 
of the past for Chicago's laundries (as 
well as the nation's I . and with the 
tough competition in that market from 
soap manufacturers, the Chicago 
Laundry Owners Association is now 
all-out to re-establish its members on 
a wide public-relations front, with 
radio as the core of the campaign. 
Newspapers are also being used to 



supplement radio selling, with four 
Chicago dailies carrying 600-line copy 
on alternate weeks, and during the 
weeks in between, 60-line copy on 
radio pages plugging the WBBM pro- 
gram. The advertising budget is built 
up by a pro rata assessment based on 
the number of routes operated by each 
laundry helping to underwrite the cost 
of the ad campaign. 

To John G. Shaw I no relation to 
John W. ). president of the CLOA, 
"radio has a psychologically good 
effect for an association campaign be- 
cause it has substance and consistency 
to it. The six-times-a-week frequency of 
Pick-Up Time is something to point 
to: the Sunday show helps, too. It 
picks up extra listeners in general, as 
well as laundry-plant heads, their 
families, and many others. Format of 
the show, with 'Pat O'Riley's' person- 
ality, makes the laundry route man a 
pretty good guy, and we have found 
sharp increases in new customers since 
we went back on the air." 

While the Chicago Laundry Owners 
Association uses broadcast advertising 
as a steady thing, the advantages that 
the medium offers local trade groups 
were made apparent to an aggressive 
coalition of local bakers in Peoria re- 
cently during an intensive nine-day 
bakery promotion. 

Assisted by members of the staff 
of the Bakers of America Program, 
the Peoria bakery group asked WMBD 
in that city to outline an over-all cam- 
paign for a local "Buy It Baked" pro- 
motion. The station's executives came 
up with an outline that included not 
only radio, but other media as well. 

The primary goal of the promotion 
was to "position" both the bakers 
and their products in the eyes of 
Peorians, and to encourage consumers 
to "buy it baked." Radio played the 
major part in the nine-day publicity 
stunt. The baker group bought seven 
ten-minute programs and 18 35-word 
announcements on WMBD. In addi- 
tion, the suggestion was made to all 
allied industries in Peoria to tie in 
with "Buy It Baked" and to donate 
portions of their own local radio time 
to the over-all campaign. 

Five WMBD advertisers cooperated. 
One wholesaler donated 17 of his an- 
nouncements on the station, while the 
Central Illinois Light Company used 
eight announcements and two 100- 
word commercials to aid the cam- 
paign. A feature of the bakers' own 
ten-minute programs was a contest 
(Please turn to page 61) 




...hi local 
station cost 

See your station 
representative or write 

UMORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W. 57th ST., NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

1 

< ^iwBHHHHHHHHIii 




Salt Lake City is a bright spot in 
the nation's economic picture. U. S. 
Department of Commerce reports 
gain of 39c in retail sales for the 
first five months of 1949 over 1948. 
It means people in Salt Lake City 
are buying more than ever. It means 
that advertising — intelligent adver- 
tising — can find responsive ears — 
through KDYL — and responsive 
eyes and ears — through K.DYL-TV 
— the twin bright spots in selling 
merchandise. 



*«««£& 



Salt Lake City, Utah 
National Representative: John Blair & Co. 



I AUGUST 1949 



59 



Contests and Offers 



a SI'OlSSOIl monthly tabulation 



, 


SPONSOR PRODUCT PROGRAM TIME OFFER TERMS OUTLET 




AMERICAN MAIZE- Canned „ 
PRODUCTS CO ° ame 


Thursday 
8:30-9:00 pm 


Three packages of Amazo in- 
stant dessert. 


Listeners must answer questions cor- 
rectly, circling the letters AMAZO on 
-'■lie sheets secured from the station, 
then call in to check their answers. 


WCOL 

Columbus, 
Ohio 


BUTTE BREWING 
CO 


Beer 


Butte Beer 

Quizmaster 


M W F 
6:15-6:30 pm 


Case of Butte Special Beer. 


Listener sending in the correct 
answer to six true-and-false state- 
ments in the letter bearing the 
earliest postmark. 


KXLF 

Butte, 

Montana 


CHRYSLER CORP 


Plymouth 

De Soto 


Hit The 
Jackpot 


Tuesday 
10-10:30 pm 


Chance to hit the jackpot via 
telephone. 


Send postcard with name and address 
to program, N. Y. 


CBS 


CROSLEY CORP 


Radio.. 
TV seta 


Who Said 
That 1 


Saturday 
9-9:30 pm 


Crosley portable radio, plus 
cumulative jackpot. 


Listeners send in a 50-word or less 
"All-Time Quote" on a specific weekly 
subject, including when, how, and 
where it was said, to program, N. Y. 


CBS 


CROSSE & 
BLACKWELL 


Canned 
Foods 


How Well 
Do You 

Know Me ? 


Thursday 
8:30-9 pm 


Cash for three-part question 


Listeners must answer any part of a 
three-section question when called. 


WFBR 

Baltimore, 
Md. 


DAIRY INDUSTRY 
OF STARK 
COUNTY. O. 


Milk 


Milkman's 
Matinee 


Friday 
4:30-4:45 pm 


Free tickets to Cleveland 
Indians ball games. 


Complete sentence, "I like milk best 

of all beverages because . . ." in 

25 words or less. 


WHBC 

Canton, 

Ohio 


GENERAL FOODS 
CORP 


Postum 


Portia Faces 
Life 


MTWTF 
5-5:15 pm 


Plastic set of six spoons and 
coasters. 


Send name and address with label 
from an Instant Postum jar and 25c 
to sponsor, Box 59, N. Y. 46, N. Y. 


NBC 


GENERAL MILLS. 
INC 


Cheerios 


Lone 
Ranger 


MWF 
7:30-8 pm 


Grand prize: $3,000. First 

prize: $1,000. Ten prizes 

of $100 each, 25 prizes 

of $10 


Identify Mystery Deputy and contact 
program, Minneapolis. 


ABC 


HAYNES MODERN 
APPLIANCES 


Appliances 


Musical 
Quiz 


MTWTF 

12:10- 
12:15 pm 


One record for answering mu- 
sical question correctly. Record 
is added to jackpot when 
question is missed. 


Listener must answer musical ques- 
tion when called. 


WGKY 

Charles- 
ton. 
W. Va. 


LIGGETT & MYERS 
TOBACCO CO, 
INC 


Chesterfield 
Cigarettes 


Chesterfield 
Supper Club 


MTWTF 
7-7:15 pm 


Carton of cigarettes, if letter 
is read on the air. 


Send letter telling why you smoke 
Chesterfields, to sponsor, N. Y. 


NBC 


P. LORILLARD 
TOBACCO CO, 
INC 


Old Gold 
Cigarettes 


Stop The 
Music 


Thursday 
8-9 pm 


Various cash and merchandise 
prizes. 


Listeners called must identify tune 
played, plus "Mystery Melody." 


ABC- 
TV 


MANHATTAN 
SOAP CO 


Sweetheart 
Soap 


We Love 
and Learn 


MTWTF 

11:15- 
11:30 am 


Lady of the Land-Rodgers 

Silverplate. 


Send three Sweetheart Soap coupons 
and 25c to sponsor, N. Y. 


NBC 


MARS, INC 


"Snicker" 
Candy Bars 


Dr. I. Q. 


Monday 
9:30-10 pm 


Various cash prizes for ques- 
tions and sketches used on 
the air. 


Send brief sketch of famous person- 
ality and/or set of "Right & Wrong" 
statements with six "Snicker" wrap- 
pers to program, Chi. 


NBC 


NICKLES BAKERY, 
INC 


B read 


Telephone 
Quiz 


MTWTF 
10-10:15 am 


$10 for answering question 

correctly. Sum accumulates 

each time question is 

missed. 


Listener must answer question cor- 
rectly when called. 


WHBC 

Canton, 

Ohio 


PARTICIPATING 


Various 


Insomnia 
Club 


MTWTF 
11-12 pm 


Various prizes. 


Winner is first one each day to call 
in correct answer during program. 


KILO 

Grand 

Rapids, 

N. Dak. 


Various 


Major 
League 
and Pacific 
Coast 
League 
Baseball 


Tu-Sun 

12:15-2 pm 

7-9 pm 


Various prizes. 


Prizes to listener sending in closest 

prediction of total week's scores of 

games carried by this station. 


KPOA 

Honolulu, 
T. H. 


PROCTER & 
GAMBLE 


Soap 


Big Sister „ M ; r , NVTF 
2-2: IS pin 


First prize: $20,000: ten of 

$1,000: one hundred of $100 

and 1,000 of $10. 


Must name Li'l Abner's pet Schmoo 

in 25 words or less, using only letters 

from the words Duz, Dreft, Ivory 

Soap. 


CBS 




Crisco 


Young 
Dr. Malone 


MTWTF 

1:30-1:45 pm 


Roasting thermometer. 


Send label, including certificate from 

3-lb. Crisco can, plus 50c, to sponsor. 

Box 2059. Cincinnati, O. 


CBS 


PRUDENTIAL INS 
CO 


Insurance 


Family 

Hour of 

Stars 


Sunday 

(1-6:30 pm 


Booklet, "It's Fun to Be 
Healthy." 


Send name and address to sponsor, 

Newark, N. J. 


CBS 


SQUIRT CO 


Soda 


Bids From Saturday ,, . 
The Kids 9: 30-10 am I Various items. 


Prizes are auctioned to children for 
Squirt bottle caps. 


WHBC 

Canton, 

Ohio 


BHte 





60 



SPONSOR 




WORTH OF 
PROMOTION 

to WSYR and NBC 
Advertisers in 1948 

That's what the bill would total 
at regular rates for WSYR's 
program promotion last year in 

Daily Newspaper Advertising 
Spot Announcements 
Station-Break Tag Lines 
Window Displays 
Mailings to Dealers 
Preparation of Publicity 
Outdoor Displays 

ACUSE 

570 kc-5000 walls 

NBC Affiliate in Central New York 

Headtey-Reed. National Representatives 




WACE 

Springfield, Mass. 

(Licensed in Chicopee) 

is happy to announce it is the latest 
Metropolitan Independent to appoint 

Independent 

Metropolitan 

Sales 

as its National Sales Representative' 
effective Aug. I, 1949 

WACE is the highest 
rated station in SPRING- 
FIELD ALL AFTERNOON 

(April — 1949 Conlan Report) 

1,000 WATT BLANKET COVERAGE OF 
WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS 



Ralph J. Robinson, Gen. Manager 

•KETTELL-CARTER-BOSTON 



LAUNDRY LESSON 

(Continued from page 59) 

for the best recipes revolving around 
new uses of baker's bread; prizes in- 
cluded a lady's wrist watch, portable 
radio, $35 gift certificate at a leading 
department store, and an automatic 
electric coffee maker. 

WMBD also promoted "Buy It 
Baked" on its Man on the Street, Tiny- 
Tot Party Time, and Breakfast Party 
programs, and gave away freshly- 
baked pies and cakes daily to the con- 
testants on the shows. The climax to 
the whole promotion was a stage show 
featuring home economists of the 
American Institute of Baking, plus 
WMBD talent for entertainment. 

The end results of the campaign 
showed that Peoria bakers' business 
increased from one to 27% during the 
nine days, with one baker reporting 
that at one point during the promotion 
it was necessary for him to hire more 
help to handle the increased flow of 
customers. 

This pattern of group or association 
use of radio applies to practically any 
type of trade organization made up of 
small businessmen who alone could 
not think of broadcast advertising. In 
Chicago, a laundry association; in 
Peoria, a group of bakers . . . and in 
Milwaukee, an alliance of druggists. 
On 8 June Oscar A. Rennebohm, gov- 
ernor of Wisconsin, was on hand at a 
dinner in honor of the staff of Mil- 
waukee's WISN, given by the Mil- 
waukee County Pharmacists' Associa- 
tion. The occasion, attended by more 
than 500 Milwaukee and Wisconsin 
druggists, marked the seventh anni- 
versary of WISN's weekly public-serv- 
ice program, Knoiv Your Druggist 
Better. 

Whether in the broadly institution- 
al, educational, and prestige sense — 
such as the Railroad Hour — or in the 
localized, direct-selling fashion of 
Pick-Up Time, radio can produce for 
trade associations whose members 
share the cost of what they as indivi- 
duals or companies might not be able, 
or might not care, to pay by them- 
selves. National advertisers can also 
benefit from association advertising 
locally or regionally, wherever the 
association is one whose members 
handle nationally-distributed products. 
What the Chicago Laundry Owners 
Association has accomplished in the 
vicinity of the Loop can be duplicated 
anywhere that there exists a trade 
association of local merchants. * * * 



WINSTON-SAIEM 




How To Put A Client Out 
Of Business 

A WAIRadio client had sev- 
eral hundred surplus trousers 
to sell. One announcement 
over WAIRadio at 6:45 AM 
sold entire stock by 10:30 
AM. Advertising cost less 
than one cent per garment. 
With new, larger stock, this 
merchant is again using 
WAIRadio sales magic. 



iSfli S .%lt>* 



tOH. 



SM 



NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




WHICH IS TALLEST? 

;uoi?rt||i |D>i4do uo «,«!— „3„. 

But It's No Illusion That 

ADVERTISING 

ON YOUR 

"XL" Stations 
Qet Results 

Put Advertising Dollars 
to Work the "XL" Way 

Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 

Eastern Western 



I AUGUST 1949 



61 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS^ 



NAB: A Progress Report 

There's no question that the National 
Association of Broadcasters made prog- 
ress at its recent board meeting in New 
Hampshire. A substantial degree of 
the credit for the movement in the right 
direction goes to Clair McCollough, 
chairman of the NAB committee on 
reorganization. 

On the credit side is the separation 
of the NAB into aural and TV broad- 
casting divisions. On the negative side 
was the inclusion of AM and FM 
broadcasting in one division. 

On the credit side was the backing 
of the Broadcast Advertising Bureau 
with an assurance that it would event- 
ually become an independent promo- 



tional branch of the industry. On the 
negative side was the ignoring of tin- 
Broadcast Measurement Bureau's future 
beyond study number two. 

On the credit side was the plan for 
an aggressive campaign to increase 
NAB membership, including a discount 
in membership fees. On the negative 
side was the throwing overboard of 
the program division, headed by show- 
u ise Harold Fair. 

On the credit side was the elimina- 
tion of the unnecessary office of execu- 
tive v.p.. now that Justin Miller knows 
what broadcasting is all about. It may 
be regretted that A.D. (Jess) Willard 
has chosen to resign from the organiza- 
tion, now that his office has been 
abolished, but Willard, a top-ranking 
station management executive, will 
bolster the industry when he returns 
to the ranks of station executives. 

It seems to SPONSOR that it would 
have been better to have taken the 
entire plunge towards making the NAB 
a "federated" organization. On the 
other hand, there may have been con- 
siderations, including the financial, 
which make such a sharp cleavage with 
the past unwise. 

Progress has been made, but the 
NAB is a long way from clearing the 
deck. Only through the BAB is the 
NAB now better equipped to serve the 
broadcast advertiser. It still has to 
change its sights from Washington to 
the 48 states — from the FCC to the 
broadcast advertiser. 



"Let's sell optimism" 

Several months ago, SPONSOR in its 
On the Hill page called attention to 
the fact that radio stood ready to 
spread the good word that business 
isn't bad — that there's plenty of ready 
cash available — that the recession is 
more mental than financial. It stressed 
the fact that the government had not 
asked for help and did not appear 
interested in fighting the creeping 
paralysis that was infecting business. 

Somewhat later this problem was 
again raised, but still nothing hap- 
pened. It was at this point that Lester 
Blumenthal, advertising director of 
sponsor, took the bull by the horns 
and in his travels plumped for coopera- 
tive promotion by stations to counter- 
act the increasing negative thinking. 
Station after station fell right in with 
ad-man Blumenthal's thinking, and 
when he returned to New York after 
a trip, he infected sponsor's staff with 
his own enthusiasm. For the first time 
in its nearly three-year-old history. 
sponsor published an open letter to 
stations, calling upon them to go to 
work for the U. S., to "sell optimism." 

The results have exceeded our fond- 
est expectations. Stations all over the 
United States, big and small, chain 
and independent, are devoting time 
daily to the amazing facts of the 
healthy economic condition of the 
United States and its people. 

To rephrase a current popular song 
— "Baby, its good in here." 



Applause 



Spot Radio Promotion Handbook 

It has long been felt that broadcast 
advertising salesmen waste too much 
time "educating" the men and women 
they contact, when they should be sell- 
ing them. This is as true of station 
representatives' field staffs as it is of 
stations' and networks' sales organiza- 
i ions. 

\n infinite number of hours are 
spent by broadcast advertising sales- 
men delivering information which the 
timebuyer and client advertising man- 
ager should have had before the sales- 
man arrives on the scene. 

It has taken Standard Kate \ Data 
Service. Inc.. to clarif) the thinking 
of stations on what the sponsor and the 
agenc] expect From station promotion. 
I nder the title Spot Radio Promotion 



Handbook. SR&DS has published the 
results of a survey on the "viewpoints 
and practices of the buyers and users 
of spot radio time." This analysis is 
based upon a survey by an independent 
research organization, coupled with 
studies made by SR&DS field-trained 
research specialists. 

It explains how stations can most 
effectively sell broadcast advertising. 
It stresses that the best salesmen in the 
advertising business can go only so 
far — that the rest of the burden belongs 
to station promotion — through direct 
mail, trade and service publication 
advertising, sales promotion. 

Having thrown light upon this sub- 
ject, the 64-page book then accepts the 
job of telling stations what you, the 
sponsor, and your agency want to know 



about broadcast advertising. 

SR&DS is publishing a series of 
studies about advertising media and 
how they are bought. Spot Radio 
Promotion Handbook is an ideal ex- 
ample of the series. The easier time- 
buying is made, the better you will be 
able to use it. The better you use it, 
the lower your cost of distribution. 

The 1949-1950 job of all advertisers 
is to lower costs of distribution. The 
high cost of distribution is being used 
by labor unions and "liberal" groups 
to attack management generally. 
SR&DS is helping reduce waste in 
broadcast advertising selling and in- 
directly waste costs in vour use of 
media. Its series is another fine ex- 
ample of business publication service 
to an industrv. 



62 



SPONSOR 



T XV1YXJC 

HEART 



KMBC KFRM 

BEATS 




Special 
Trade Paper Edition 



J/umt tAe Meant ofi fon&uca, 



Kansas City, 
Early Summer, 1949 



KFRM Again First In 1949 Survey 

Kansas Farm Station Tops 1948 
Fall Rating 12%; Remains First 
Choice of Kansas Listeners Daytime 



KMBC AGAIN FIRST 

CHOICE OF KANSAS 

CITY LISTENERS 

Proof that KMBC con- 
tinues to be the most 
listened-to station in 
Greater Kansas City is 
contained in the latest 
Kansas City survey re- 
leased by Conlan & As- 
sociates. 

This general coinci- 
dental telephone survey 
was conducted in March 
to April, 1949, under 
the joint sponsorship of 
KC radio stations in- 
cluding KMBC. Over 
70,000 basic calls were 
made during the one 
week survey period be- 
tween the hours of 7:00 
a.m. and 11 :00 p.m. 

Although KMBC 
rated first mornings, 
afternoons and eve- 
nings, most spectacular 
ratings were in the f ore- 
noons when KMBC 
topped its nearest com- 
petitor 34%. KMBC led 
its competition in this 
survey by an even 
greater margin than in 
a similar survey in No- 
vember, 1948. 

This new survey and 
other surveys giving de- 
tailed information on lis- 
tening habits through- 
out the Kansas City 
Trade Area — western 
Missouri, all of Kansas, 
and portions of adja- 
cent states — are avail- 
able to advertisers and 
agencies for their ex- 
amination and study. 
Simply call any KMBC 
or KFRM man, or any 
Free & Peters "Colonel". 



KFRM AREA SURVEYS 

SPRING — 1949 AND 
FALL — 1948 



12.8 




Percentage of 


1 1.4 


ll.l 


Total Audience 


K 
F 
R 


"9T 






JL 5 — 

6.7~ 


TT 1 


■T.U 


5.8 


5.5 


M 











1st "2nd '3rd 4th 5th 



LEGEND: 

The larger figures and 
solid lines indicate the 
March, 1949 Survey, and 
the small figures and dot- 
ted lines denote the Fall, 
1948 standing. The aster- 
isks denote Wichita sta- 
tions. 79 Kansas counties, 5 
Oklahoma counties and 4 
Nebraska counties were in- 
cluded in the March, 1949 
Survey. 73 Kansas, 5 Okla- 
homa, and 4 Nebraska coun- 
ties were included in the 
Fall, 1948 Survey. 

A total of 62,368 basic 
calls ivere made and 14,423 
listening homes surveyed in 
this new study. 

The Kansas, Oklahoma 
and Nebraska counties are 
dramatically pictured on 
the map below. All counties 
are within KFRM's 0.5 
rnv/m contour. 



Kansas radio listeners have again named KFRM as 
the most listened-to station, daytime, in the Sun- 
flower State. Moreover, the "Kansas Farm Station" 
leads its competition by 



a greater margin even 
than before according to 
a March 1949 radio sur- 
vey made by Conlan & 
Associates. 

This coincidental sur- 
vey, one of the largest of 
its kind ever conducted, 
required over 62,000 tele- 
phone calls within KF- 
RM's half-millivolt con- 
tour. 

Essentially rural in na- 
ture, this Conlan Survey 
covered 79 counties in 
Kansas (all except the 
eastern-most and north- 
eastern Kansas counties), 
four in Nebraska and 
five in Oklahoma. Popu- 
lation of these 88 coun- 
ties is 1,038,146, not in- 
cluding the metropolitan 
centers of Hutchinson 
and Wichita, Kansas 




which were not surveyed. 

KFRM leads all broad- 
casters for the morning 
periods, and is first dur- 
ing the afternoon periods 
— first in listener prefer- 
ence for both time peri- 
ods, as well as for the 
entire survey. 

KFRM's programming 
is specifically designed 
for the area served, in- 
cluding up-to-the-minute 
daily livestock and grain 
markets direct from Kan- 
sas City, as well as other 
outstanding daily farm 
features. In addition, 
KFRM programming pre- 
sents special newscasts, 
women's programs, 
sports, special events, 
educational features, as 
well as top-flight enter- 
tainment programs fea- 
turing members of the 
KMBC-KFRM talent 
staff. This popularity in- 
dicates that listeners are 
getting the kind of pro- 
gram service they like 
and need from KFRM. 

KFRM joined with 
KMBC forms The KMBC- 
KFRM Team. Together, 
The Team provides ad- 
vertisers with the most 
complete, effective and 
economical coverage of 
the huge Kansas City 
Primary Trade Area! 




▼ w iIlM m. S 




TUSCALOOSA 



onstrudtion Permit 



MONTGOMERY 




THOMASVILLE 




'COLUMBUS, GA. 



lid aiii 

^J <4 a *■ A A A 




VoweWDixie - BIRMINGHAM. Alabam 



auwuji 1747 • so. uu a i ear 








You get what you pay for — p. 24 

The Squirt slant — p. 22 

Local TV— p. 57 

The liquor question — p. 32 

A young lady shows her bottle tops — p. 22 



^ v id ran 

ON I IS V DO, , lfN 

3 ftO V H d S J-',^.j rj , ... 
OZZZ i ,.. ^_ f HC; 





Look as you may, you'll find nothing else like the 
Havens and Martin stations in Richmond, Virginia. 

They're unique. 

Unique in their coverage of the AM, FM, and TV 

fields . . . the only audio 

and video institution in Virginia. 

Unique in tradition and reputation. Since 1926, 
when WMBG went on the air, Havens and Martin stations 
have stood for pioneer planning, long-range thinking, 
and the fullest measure of broadcast service. 

Unique in sales. Ask any Blair man. 




WMBG am 
WTYR'v 
WCOD'" 



ffiwd/ &MuhjU €fftywPaMi44Z 



Havens and Martin Stations, Richmond 20, Va. 
John Blair & Company, National Representatives 
Affiliates of National Broadcasting Company 




DECEIVED 



Aim i 



TS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




1/949 



..SPONSOR REPORT 



15 August 1949 



Ex-NBC-TV head 

asks CBS-TV for 

color-TV option 



29% of all retail 

sales in 1948 were 

time-payment 



Everything goes 
over closed- 
circuits 



Pulse to report 
language listening 



As talk of color-TV continues, trade is amused that it was Noran 
Kersta, ex-TV head of NBC, who asked for first option of CBS-TV com- 
mercial color television for Revion nail polish. Revion is using 
selective announcements on New York's WCBS-TV, WNBT, and WBZ-TV in 
Boston. 

-SR- 

Importance of time-sales in U.S. economy is indicated by Federal 
Reserve Board's report that 29% of all retail sales in 1948 were in 
the extended-payment category. Expectation is that this can be in- 
creased to 39% in 1949, and radio will be used to build credit 
retailers' business. 

-SR- 

Network closed-circuits are being used as promotional devices in 
more ways than ever before. Dealer meetings, conventions, star- 
recorded station breaks, promotional programs for delayed transmis- 
sion, and host of other devices are made possible by weekly (and 
with some webs, daily) linking up of stations for non-air messages. 

-SR- 

Importance of foreign-language broadcasting is indicated by Pulse's 
announcement that it will issue regular reports for Italian language 
market in New York. Plans for expanding into other language markets 
are in works. 

-SR- 



CMQ leads in 


Cuba 


's latest 


survey 


of liste 


ning showed CMQ still 


in 1< 


jad in 


Cuban listening 


Havana, the Interior 


, and on 


entire island. Relative standings were: 


ratings 




Station 

CMQ 

RHC 

CMBC 

CMCF 

CMBL 

CMBZ 

COCO 

CMCH 

CMKR 

CMKW 




Havana 
7.85 
5.44 
2.60 
2.39 
0.91 
0.70 
0.77 
0.32 


-SR- 


Interior 
11.17 
6.09 
1.05 
0.76 
0.12 
0.27 
0.09 
0.04 
0.32 
1.00 




National 
9.46 
5.75 
1.85 
1.59 
0.52 
0.49 
0.44 
0.18 
0.11 
0.48 


General Mills 


General Mills 


will not cut any of its 


advertising, 


will 


spend 


sticks to its 


$18, 


000,000 in 


1949, 


keeping 


11 radio 


programs and 


"Lone Ranger" in 


$18,000,000 ad 


TV. 


Sales are 


down 


but GM tb 


inking is that advertising 


must be kept 


budget 


going to counteract 


further p 


ossible 


ieclines. 







SPONSOR. Volume 3. No. 19. 15 Auirust. 1949. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications Inc.. 3110 Elm, Baltimore 11. Md. Executive. Advertising. Editorial. Circulation 
Offices 40 W. 52 St., N. Y. 19, N. Y. $8 a year in C. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 .it Baltimore, Md. post office under Act 3 March 1879. 



15 AUGUST 1949 



REPORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR R 



More changes due 
at NBC 



Beech-Nut will 

use AM and TV 

this fall 



Wildroot expands 
broadcast horizon 



English Aimers 

to invade TV-film 

market 



Vacation advertising 

exceeds $10,000,000 

this season 



Tea Bureau ad 
media not set 



IN THIS ISSUE 



NBC will shortly have administrative v. p. in full charge of aural 
broadcasting, just as it has for IV. It will also be announced 
shortly that NBC-Radio Recording will move to RCA, leaving only 
custom-built transcriptions in network fold. 

-SR- 
Beech-Nut, which hasn't been too active an air advertiser, will be 
on both AM and TV this fall. Harry Goodman is doing coordinated 
recorded jingle and jingle-plus-animation film, with comprehensive 
schedule planned by K&E. 

-SR- 
Wildroot, having done terrific job on network with "Sam Spade" and 
other shows, is now expanding its horizon with Richard Ullman's 
"Barbershop Harmonies" on 400 "beyond metropolitan" stations of Key- 
stone Broadcasting System. KBS stations are generally one-market 
stations and have good record in soiling products like hair tonics. 

-SR- 
English commercial film producers expect to move in on TV commercial 
film building in New York. Signal recently previewed some of its 
puppet and stop-motion commercials at New York's Museum of Modern 
Art and amazed reviewers on quality of British film selling. Price 
is right, too. 

-SR- 
Group advertising in travel and vacation field will exceed $10,000,- 
000 this season. Radio will get only about 3% of this, with good 
part of this 3% coming from state publicity bureaus. 

-SR- 
Tea Bureau, returning to advertising after nine years, may have 
ultimate budget of $1,500,000. Bureau will not decide on media 
until agency is appointed. Decision on agency is expected momen- 
tarily. 

—Please turn to page 34— 



capsuled highlights 



Does hard liquor advertising belong on page 32 
the air? Mr. Sponsor asks this question and 
both sides of the question answer it. 

Bottle tops can be juvenile money, and sell page 22 
soft drinks. The experience of Squirt makes 
a helpful story. 

"To pay or not to pay the card rates," that page 24 
is the question that many sponsors face at least 
once in their broadcast advertising careers. 
The case pro and con is a SPONSOR report. 

It's not good business to use broadcast ad- page 28 
vertising without adequate research — before 
and while using the air. 



Judge a talevision station by its local pro- 
grams. Its network programs you can judge in 
your own town. 

U. S. audiences are going to get the 
works — promotionwise this fall. The four net- 
works are working hard to build listening to 
their own webs and to radio in general. 

IN FUTURE ISSUES 



page 57 
page 19 



The Adam Hat story 

What's wrong with City Hooperatings? 

The TV children's hour 

What disk spinners do and why 



29 Aug. 
29 Aug. 
29 Aug. 
29 Aug. 

SPONSOR 



"Today's Woman" 
Recommends 

Springerle • . . 




ANNE HAYES— mother, homemaker, and popular 
Mid-America radio personality. 



50,000 WATTS DAY 

10,000 WATTS NIGHT- 

810 Kc. 




at a Very Low Cost per 1000 Coverage! 

Ever tried Springerle? It's a little white cookie. You beat the mixture by 
hand for an hour . . . and the cookies are delicious! (They should be!) 

Out Mid-America way, you might have picked up this recipe from 
"Today's Woman" (Anne Hayes, director of KCMO's women's activi- 
ties). For on her Monday- thru-Friday "Today's Woman" show, she 
gives many a recipe, homemaking tip, and (ah, yes) plug for 
sponsored products. 

If you have a story to tell to "better-halves" of Mid-America families, 
let Anne Hayes give them the word. It will be well-told . . . and told at 
a low, very low, cost per 1000 coverage. Kansas City's most powerful 
station, KCMO, serves 213 Mid- America counties with a potential 
listenership of over 5,435,000 inside its 50,000 watt measured )i mv. 
coverage area. 

KCMO 

and KCMO-FM...94.9 Megacycles 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Basic ABC for Mid- America 

National Representative: John E. Pearson Company 



15 AUGUST 1949 



VOL.3 



NO.V) 



A5 MIGUST 



A9A9 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

NEW AND RENEW 

ON THE HILL 

MR. SPONSOR: J. B. BELTAIRE 

P. S. 

NETWORK FALL PROMOTION 

THE SQUIRT SLANT 

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR 

DEALER COOPERATIVE ADVERTISING 

A RESEARCH PORTFOLIO 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

TV RESULTS 

LOCAL TV PROGRAMING 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 



1 
4 
9 
12 
14 
16 
19 
22 
24 
26 
28 
32 
51 
56 
57 
62 
62 




Published biweekly tiv SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Kircutlre. Kdltorlal. ami Advertising Offices: 40 West T>2 
New Yc.rk 19 N ^ Telephone: Plaza 3-1:21 « 
Chlcag • ■ ' " a A»c Due Ti li phone: Fi- 

nancial ISSfl. Publication Offices: S110 Klin. Italtlmore 11. 
Mil Bu Dn led States 18 

In 1 8. A. 1 
right 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

' ' ud Pun m it Qleni 

Treasurer: Klalne I 

Koehlei \ | rank Bum sti r, Charles 

.Sinclair, linn 1; Oman Editorial Department 
Hraun. v Dlrectoi Howard Wechsler, 

ler J. liliin 
: B di B I 
Uanar ulatlon Man 

K » 4,i ' Marrla Chlnitz. Emily 

CutlllO bei ilitUaU Shea man. 

I 01 I I! I'M TI Rl ! i, i_. ■• „ s.niirt Ik.i 

1 other Ihlr Dctarv valm 



IO West 52nd 



WRONGLY PLACED 

The TV Results section, on page 56 
<>f the 4 July issue, includes two 
case histories from WLW-T. 

The case histories are correct, but 
WLW-T is wrongly placed in Toledo. 
We are situated, of course, in Cincin- 
nati. 

These case histories. I hasten to add. 
are an extremely interesting source of 
information, and we are pleased to be 
among those mentioned. 

James Cassidy 
Public Relations Dir. 
WLW. Cincinnati 



"THE BIG PLUS" 

I have just finished reading your 
4 July issue, and want to congratulate 
you on your lead article. The big plus. 

It certainly points up the fallacy of 
complete dependence on home tele- 
phone interviews for establishing in- 
dividual station listenership. I would 
certainly think that all independents 
particularly would make the article 
part of their sales kit. 

In that connection, I would like to 
order 50 reprints for distribution to 
the key agencies and accounts in the 
Worcester market. 

John J. Hurley 
General Manager 
WNEB. Worcester. Mass. 



UNAUTHORIZED ADVERTISING 

In an article appearing in your mag- 
azine 1 4 July issue I. The case for and 
against per-inquiry advertising, there 
is a paragraph devoted to "a Lone 
Ranger pen set with belt." 

For your information, this type of 
advertising was done without our 
knowledge or consent and in contra- 
vention to the merchandise license 
under which the rights to manufacture 
and sell Lone Ranger pen sets was 
given. 

I pon notice of such type of adver- 
tising and sale, this company immedi- 
ately took steps to cause all offers to 
radio stations to be withdrawn and 
all such type of merchandising to be 
immediately stopped. 

Raymond J. Meurer 
General Counsel 
The Lone Ranger. Inc. 
(Please turn to page 6) 



Carl Is A 
Confidence Man! 




It's rumored that some of our 
competitors call our Carl "Laughing 
Boy" behind his back. 

And it's said that the smile that 
lights up Carl's puss is just a big 
front. 

But if you look close at these 
rumor-boys, you can see a little 
green around the gills, which ain't 
seasickness . . . it's envy! 

Because Carl's grin is the real 
McCoy . . . it's just like the one 
he sees on most of our advertisers. 
They pat him on the back and 
shake him by the hand, and call 
him their "confidence" man. 

And it ain't because he sells fake 
oil wells or bum gold mines, either! 
Our Carl is a confidence man be- 
cause local and national advertisers 
put their faith in him. When they 
want to move a product here, 
they've found out that WDSM and 
WEVE is the combination. 

If you're worried about things 
tightening up . . . relax . . . because 
that's where Carl comes in. He 
does his level best to keep WDSM 
(Duruth-Superior) and WEVE (the 
Iron Range) doing a consistently 
good job for advertisers. 

No wonder the competition would 
like to wipe that grin off Carl's 
face . . . they're bored silly hearing 
time-buyers talk about the good 
deal they get from Carl . . . buying 
our 2 ABC stations for the price 
of ONE Duluth station! 

If you have a selling problem in 
our part of the country, why not 
let Confident Carl help solve it for 
you? Any Free and Peters man 
will give you the low-down. 




The 

T3R1QHT SPOT 

Covering for the first time, 
JS/brtheast Jllabamcts 
3oo t ooo buyers 




WSPC 

Tie-presented by The Walher Company 



FULLTIME IOOOWATT5 
I3 90 K.C. 




AJVMSTON, JILA13AMA 



General Manager— GANUS SCARBOROUGH 




Pont do anythin g 
until you hear 
from lanj-W/orth! 




— «4t^" 



N 



Watch for announcement of Lang- 
Worth's amazing NEW transcribed 
music library — a revolutionary develop- 
ment in the field of sound reproduction! 



IMG-WORTH 

feature programs, inc. 

113 W. 57th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N.Y. 

Network Calibre Programs at Cocal Station Cost 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

BUSINESS IS BETTER 

Have you heard anyone mention un- 
employment recently? 

In Washington. D. C. business is 
always better, and we can prove it. For 
instance: 

The Executive Branch of our Gov- 
ernment is the largest of the Govern- 
ment divisions in Washington. This 
"industry" is HIRING. 

Look at these figures for the Execu- 
tive Branch for 1949: 

Month INCREASED Personnel 

January plus 1.194 

February plus 896 

March plus 1.317 

April plus 1.105 

May plus 959 

The total Government paycheck, by 
the way. in this lush WTOP area, is 
•S762.000.000 annually. And this check 
doesn't bounce! 

Yes, indeed. Business Is Always 
Better in Washington! 

John S. Hayes 

General Manager 

WTOP, Washington. D. C. 



We are interested in the "Lets sell 
optimism"' campaign. 

Russell J. Pirkey 
Client relations 
WKLO, Louisville, Ky. 



This "Let's sell optimism" looks like 
a good idea to us. and we intend to do 
what we can in this area. 

J. B. Bradshaw 
Program director 
KFRL Wichita. Kan. 



We are interested in the idea of 
selling optimism. 

Elliott Stewart 

Executive v.p. 

WIBX. WIBX-FM, Utica, N. Y. 



THE P. I. PROBLEM 

Congratulations on the fine analysis 
which you presented in the 4 July issue 
on The P. I. problem. 

Permit me. however, to correct an 
apparent misconception on your part 

SPONSOR 



as to the stature of WNAX. On the 
basis of independent findings by Audi- 
ence Surveys. Inc., the WNAX audi- 
ence is composed of only about one- 
third farm and two-thirds village and 
city; and we program as we do for the 
entire market, it being a known fact 
that in this great Middle West the city 
feller and the farmer are not very far 
apart in their radio likes and dislikes. 
Big Aggie's success in both listener 
and advertising results for the past 11 
years under the Cowles banner is tes- 
timony to the soundness of that policy. 

You are absolutely correct in your 
statement that "when a broadcaster 
stresses direct mail, he, at the same 
time, inferentially sells the retailer 
short." Also inferentially, you left the 
impression that WNAX. because of the 
absence of retail outlets in this area, 
must depend on direct mail. 

Nothing could be further from the 
truth, and I would welcome a visit 
from some member of your staff so 
that he might visit some of these "cross 
roads" and determine for himself just 
how much retail business is done over 
the counter. Failing that. I am sure 
there are ample sources in New York 
for determining just what store sales 
are in Big Aggie Land. 

I take only slight exception to your 
statement that "direct mail at stations 
like WNAX is like blood in a human 
body." In this you are correct, but only 
partially so. We consider the direct- 
mail business we carry to be in the 
nature of the white corpuscles in the 
blood; although small in number, they 
prevent the spread of infection and dis- 
ease (in our case, the spread of the 
disease of lethargy in the form of disk- 
jockey, network-push-button type of 
operation ) . and are an insurance 
policy against what are generally con- 
sidered nonrevenue producing periods 
of the day. 

On the other hand, the really blue- 
chip business, which constitutes over 
90% of our income, is the red cor- 
puscles in our blood, the ones which 
give us energy, strength, vitality, and 
the wherewithal to continue to make 
Big Aggie one of the biggest and best 
stations in the country. 

As. any doctor will tell you, the ratio 
of red corpuscles to white is over- 
whelmingly in favor of the red; and 
Big Aggie has plenty of good red blood 
in her veins. 

Robert R. Tincher 
V.p. & Gen. mgr. 
WNAX, Yankton, S. D. 
* * * 



it's easy. 



IF YOU 
KNOW HOW! 




spectacular stuff, sure, but it isn't just "knack "; it's the 
result of experience and Know-How — just as KWKH's 
Hoopers are! Here are the Share of Audience figures for 
March-April, '49: 

Mornings (Mon. thru Fri.) KWKH 39.6 

(70% better than next station) 
AFTERNOONS (Mon. thru Fri.) KWKH 31.7 

(7% better than next station) 
EVENINGS (Sun. thru Sat.) KWKH 42.5 

(47% better than next station) 

Twenty-four years' experience in broadcasting to our par- 
ticular audience has given us at KWKH an incomparable 
radio Know-How. How about getting all the facts, now? 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts 



Texas 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



Arkansas 
CBS Mississippi 

The Braham Company, Representatives 
Henry Clay, General Manager 



15 AUGUST 1949 



HOOPER wzeti foetaqe. Pudex. 
PROVES — 

KVOO 
DOMINANCE 




IN A 43 COUNTY AREA 

The map at right shows the 43 County Area 
DOMINANTLY served by KVOO. It covers the 
30 county Tulsa Market Area Plus rich bonus 
counties in Oklahoma, Kansas and Arkansas. 
According to the 1948 BMB estimate 372,980 
radio hom°s are in the 43 county area. Following 
are the stations and percent of mentions, Sun- 
day thru Saturday for the period, Spring, 1949. 



KANSAS 






^TOVvA: 




% OF MENTIONS 



% OF MENTIONS 



"D" 



STATIONS 

KVOO 

"B" 
"C" 

D' 

'E' 

a r a 

"G" 
"H" 

a in 

'K' 
'V 
"M" 
'N' 
O' 
'P' 

'Q' 

"R" 
"S" 



Note The ' 
and your fo 
not the size. 



"K" 

hi a 

"M" 
"N" 

"O" 

"P" 

"r\" 



MOD 


NINC 


AFTIRNOON 


IVI 


4ING 


6 AM 8 AM 


8 AM Noon 




3 PM 6 PM 


6 PM 10 PM 


10 PM Mid 


38% 


26% 


43% 


32% 


36% 


38% 


6% 


9% 


4% 


7% 


12% 


9% 


9% 


9% 


7% 


8% 


7% 


7% 


3% 


8% 


8% 


9% 




t 


2% 


4% 


3% 


3% 


4% 


2% 


4% 


3% 


2% 


3% 


2% 


2% 


2% 


4% 


2% 


2% 


2% 


LT 


2% 


1% 


2% 


2% 


2% 


2% 


LT 


2% 


2% 


2% 


1% 


2% 


2% 


2% 


1% 


2% 


LT 





3% 


2% 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


LT 





LT 


LT 


3% 


4% 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


2% 


2% 


LT 











1% 


5% 


1% 


1% 


LT 


LT 


1% 


2% 


1% 


LT 


LT 


1% 


2% 


1% 


2% 


LT 


LT 


2% 


t 


t 


1% 


1% 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


1% 


1% 


LT 


1% 



STATIONS 
ii'yii 

"U" 

"W" 
"X" 

ll\JII 
llfll 

"AA" 

"BB" 

"CC" 

"DD" 

"EE" 

"FF" 

"GG" 

"HH" 

"II" 

OTHERS 

LT — Listening less than 1 % 

— No Mentions found in sample 

: — Does not broadcast throughout this day-part 

'Area Coverooe Index" is computed from the "Stotion Mentions" secured from the onswers to the question: "To what stations do you 
Tiily listen MOST FREQUENTLY or THE MOST TIME?" Because Indexes show "% of mentions", this is a measure of the distribution, 
of the audiences to the respective stations. 



MOR 


NINC 


AFTCHNOON 


EVi 


XING 


6 AM 8 AM 


8 AM Noon 


Noon 3 PM 


3 PM 6 PM 


6 PM 10 PM 


10 PM Mid 


1% 


2% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


LT 


2% 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


LT 


LT 


2% 


1% 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


LT 


LT 


LT 


LT 


2% 


LT 


LT 


1% 


LT 


2% 


LT 


1% 


2% 


LT 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


1% 


LT 


LT 


LT 





LT 


LT 





LT 


1% 


1% 


LT 


1% 


LT 


1% 


\ 


t 














LT 


2% 


LT 


LT 


1% 


LT 


t 


t 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


1 


A. 
1 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


X 

1 


t 


LT 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


LT 














LT 


1% 


LT 


LT 


LT 


1% 


i 


i 


8% 


11% 


9% 


11% 


12% 


14% 



RADIO STATION KVOO 



50.000 WATTS 



EDWARD PETRY AND CO., INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



OKLAHOMA'S CREATEST STATION 



TULSA. OKLA, 



SPONSOR 



/.-) Al GUS1 1949 




New ami rvnnu. 



THESE REPORTS APPEAR IN ALTERNATE ISSUES 




New National Selective Business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MKTS CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



American Chicle Co. 

American Cyanamitl Co. 

(Agric. Prods. Div.) 
lii istol-Myers Co. 

Brown & Williamson 

Drackett Co. 

Dolcin Corp. 

Glaze-All Corp. 
John F. Jelke Co. 

Ontario Fruit & Vegetable 
Growers Assn. 

Ed Pinaud, Inc. 

Republic Pictures 

San-Nap-Pak Mir. Co. 
Standard Oil of Indiana 
Standard Oil of Ohio 
Inited Artists 
Worthington Products, Inc. 



Chewing gum 

Weed killer-tohacco 

plant food 
Vitalis 

Raleigh cigarettes 
Windex; Drano 
Oolcin 

Auto polishes 

Good Luck Mar- 
garine, etc. 

Fresh farm 
produce 

Pinaud's Lilac 
Vegetal 

Movie: "Red 
Menace" 

Lydia Grey 

Doeskin Tissues 
Petroleum products 

Petroleum products 

Movie: "Black 

Magic" 
Sleep-Eeze 



Badger & Browning 
and Hersey 

(N.Y.) 
Hazard (N.Y.) 

Doherty. Clifford & 
Shenfield (N.Y.) 

Russell M. Seeds 
(Chi.) 

Young & Ruhicam 

(N.Y.) 

\ ictnr van der 
Linde (N.Y.) 

Deuss-Gordon 

(Chi.) 
Tatham-Laird 

(Chi.) 

Mi Kim (Toronto) 
Dorland (N.Y.) 



Donahue & Coe 

(N.Y.) 

Federal (N.Y.) 

McCiinn-Erickson 

(Chi.) 
McCann-Erickson 

(Cleve.) 
Monroe Greenthal 

(N.Y.) 
William Von Zehle 

(N.Y.) 



4 sta; 4 mkts* 
(Intensive test of copy) 

18 sta; 18 mkts 

(Farm mkts in South) 

Indef 

(National campaign planned) 

Indef; 35 ink is 

(Limited natl campaign; 

daytime spots) 

29-35 sta; 29 mkts* 

(Fall campaign in major 

mkts) 

Don Lee Network 

(Follows tests in N.Y., 

Toronto) 

Indef; 12 mkts 

(Midwest test; may expand) 

Indef* 

(Test campaign in S. 

(California) 

Indef* 

(Ontario stas. only; May 

expand later) 

4 sta; 4 mkts 

(Eastern short-term test 

(campaign) 

25-30 sta; 25 mkts 

(Short-term, intensive 

campaign) 

Indef 

(Limited natl campaign) 

8 sta; 8 mkts 

(Midwest seasonal campaign) 

1") sta; 15 mkts 

(Special sports network) 

Indef; 20 mkts 

(Saturation campaign) 

18 sta; 18 mkts 

(Test; may expand) 



E.t. breaks; early Aug. 



« k> 



Spots, breaks; .lul-Aug starts; 52 

wks 
E.t. spots, breaks, early Fall; 13 

wks 
E.t. spots; Aug. 1; 13 wks 



Spots in women's partic prgms; 
early Sep; 13 wks 

"Rendezvous with David Ross" e.t.; 
3-wkly from Sep 19; 13 wks 

Spots, breaks; Aug starts; 13 wks 

E.t. spots, breaks (also TV films); 
early Fall, 13 wks 

"Mary Garden's Market Basket," 5- 
wkly; July-Aug starts; abt 13 
wks 

E.t. spots; Jul-Aug starts; abt 4-6 
wks 

E.t. spots, breaks; early Aug; 2-3 
wks 

E.t. spots, breaks; early Aug; 13 

wks 
University and pro football games; 

Sep-Dec season 
Cleveland Browns football games; 

13-game series from late Sep 
E.t. spots, breaks; early Aug; 13 

wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Jul-Aug; 13 wks 



Station list set at present, although more may be added later. 
(Fifty-two weeks generally mean* a IS-week contract with options ior 
oj any 1 3-week period) 



$ successive IS-week renewals. It's subject to cancellation at tht end 



€ET^ New and Renewed Television (Network and Selective) 



ml 



m 




SPONSOR 



AGENCY NET OR STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Cigarette 

& Cigar Co (Pall Mall) 



American Tobacco Co 

(Lucky Strike 

Cigarettes) 
P. Ballantine & Sons 
Benrus Watch Co 
Borden Co 

Bulova Watch Co 

B.V.D. Corp 

Carter Products Inc 

(Arrid) 
Continental Baking Co 

(Wonder Bread) 
Dean Milk Co 
Esso Standard Oil Co 

Fiiistner Chain Corp 



International Silver Co 



Sullivan, Stauffer, 
Col well & Bayles 



N. W. Ayer 



J. Walter Thompson 

Tarcher 

Young & Ruhicam 

Biow 
Grey 
Sullivan, Stauffer, 

Colwell & Bayles 
Ted Bates 

Swaney 
Marschalk & Pratt 

A. W. Lewin 



Young & Ruhicam 



WNBT, N.Y. 

WBZ-TV, Boston 

WNBQ, (hi. 

WPTZ, Phila. 

WCBS-TV, N.Y. 

WRGB, Schenec- 
tady 

WCBS-TV, N.Y. 

CBS-TV net 

WCBS-TV, N.Y. 

WNBQ, Chi. 

WCBS-TV. N.Y. 

WNBW, Wash. 

KNDH, H'wood 

WRGB, Schenec- 
tady 

WCBS-TV, N.Y. 

WNBQ, Chi. 
CBS-TV net 

WNBW, Wash. 
WNBT, N.Y. 
WNBQ, Chi. 
WCBS-TV, N.Y. 
CBS-TV net 



Film spots; Aug 1; 13 wks (r) 



Film spots; June 27; 13 wks (r) 



Tournament of Champions; Wed 10-11 pm; Oct 5; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; July 11; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; July 1; 13 wks (n) (r) 

Film spots; Aug. 30; 4 wks (r) 
Film spots; July 18; 7 wks (n) 
Film spots; Aug 1; 15 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; July 25; 13 wks (n) 

Film anncmts; July 10; 13 wks (n) 

Tonight On Broadway; Su 7-7:30 pm; Oct 2; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots; various starting dates from July 20- Aug 1; 13 wks 
(n) 



Silver Theatre; Mon 8-8:30 pmj Oct 3; 52 wks; (n) 



• fit next issue: \t-it and Renewed on Networks, Sponsor Personnel Changes, 
National Broadeast Sales Executive Changes, New Agencg Appointments 








New and Renewed Television (Continued) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY NET STATIONS 






Keelej Bre« ink ■ ■ • 

l: 
I .ii'hiii.iiui Itn-vi ri lei l"» 

id Rug ( a 

• iir Deodei .mi i 
i .11 pentei Morton 
ints) 
Paul lii< 

| M.HIMllsl 

Rei Inn Producti < 01 p 

It. .1. I{<> nolda Tobai • 
Simmoni < o 

M ,u i i 

Whiti !■■ ■ I 



Weintraufa 



Sihv* imuii-i \ Scotl 



PROGRAM, time, start duration 



u BZ-T\ . Boston 
WCBS-Tt . N.I 

w \i;d. \.\ . 
VVNBQ, Chi. 



Foote, Cone \ Belding « ABD, v . 
Anderson, Davis & Platte I BS-1 \ net 
Lndffin 



Dowd 

Hi isai in i . \\ heelei 

\\ i inli auli 



Est] 

Vuun^ & Rubicam 



I ,ii i In i 



\M bs rv. n i 

VVNBQ, (In. 

w IBD. N.1 

\\ NBT, N.Y. 
\\ BZ I \ . Boston 
\S( i:s l\ . \. . . 
CBS-TV in i 
w \liij. Chi. 

ui BS iv. N.Y. 



Film --lints ; July 25; 13 wks (n) 

Fifteen minute Mm programs; July 30; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; Auk 6; .1 »ks (n) 

Maslin Al Home Party; Wed 7:45-8 pm; Sent 14; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; July 22; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots Auk 1; 13 wks (n) 

ill lit spills; July 14; 2d wks I 111 

Film spots; July 20; 13 wks I n i 



Mysterj Show; In s ; :jii-ij ,, m ; Oct ~ ; 52 wks (n) 
Film spots; July 1; 13 wks (r) 

Film spots; Aug 25; 13 wks In) 



Station Representation Changes 



STATION 



AFFILIATION 



NEW NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Kl GO, l area N. D. 

KITE, San Antonio Tux. 

KNOW, Austin Tex. 

KSJO, -s .i i. Jose i ilii 

KSTL, St. L. 

u IBB, Mobile Ala. 

\\ m l . Chicopee-Springrfield Mass. 

\n \i;i . Arlington Va. 

WBEN I \ . liullalo N. Y. 

hi in, Ft Wayne lnd. 

wnilM. Memphis Tcnn. 

w IK i . Evansville lnd. 

\\ I LS, Lansing Midi. 

HI \\ I \ . Grand Rapids Mich. 

N NOK, N.nfolk Va. 

h m i rv, Miiw. 

H H SO, Springfield (). 

W \ I.W, Indianapolis 



ABC 
Independent 

A ISC 

Independent 

Independent 

MBS 

Independent 

Independent 

ABC, CBS, DuMont. NBC 

Independent 

Independent 

Independent 

MBS 

ABC. CBS. DuMont, NBC 

Independent 

ABC, CBS. DuMont, NBC 

Independent 

Independent 



Sales 



Sales 



Sales 
Sales 



Boiling 

Independent Metropolitan 

John E. Pearson 

Forjoe, as Western rep 

Independent Metropolitan 

Branham 

Independent 

Independent 

Harrington, 

Independent 

Independent 

Independent 

William Rambeau 

John E. Pearson 

Independent Metropolitan Sales 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons 

Independent Metropolitan Sales 

Independent Metropolitan Sales 



Metropolitan 
Metropolitan 
Righter & Parsons 
Metropolitan Sales 
Metropolitan Sales 
Metropolitan Sales 



Adverising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Kenneth Beirn 
I'eter Black 
Victor G. Blede 
William A. Chalmers 
Wallace I lark 
John S. Davidson 
James I. Delaney 
Cordelia Feehan 
hi Feldman 
F.dgar M. Forrest 

John N. Freeman 
James Aston Greig 
lilaney Harris 

1 i ink Helton 
William |{. Hesse 
Milton Hill 
Spencer Hill 
William II. Howard 
Russell Hunt 
I mi Kaufman 

■ is kerr 
Ben Lang 
Richard Liebman 
James l ■'.. Lillii 
John M. Lord 
Thurston MacGriffick 
Allan A. Marsh Jr 
Byron Mayo 

John .1 . Mori ison 
Herbert a. Morse 
v Raamussen 

I i anklin s. Robei ts 
1 . I >imons 
Ainunil Sjuvjk 
\tln. I 

.1 anus I, Siimiiii i s 
Charles R. Tanton 

Philip P. \\ all, , 

Ralph II. \\ hitmorc 
Hand H. w illiaros 
i in ii- R. Wintera ii 

Sldne) It Wolfe 



Biow, N. x .. vp 

Harold Cabot, Boston, acct exec 
French & Preston, N. Y-. copy dir 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y. t acct exec 

Fletcher D. Richards, N. Y\, vp 
McCann-Erickson, N. Y". 

Furman-Hanser, N. Y'., acct exec 
(Jardner, Wash., copy chief on U. S. Army. 
Air Force acct 

Gatke Corp, Chi., adv mgr 



Grant, Chi., copy dir 
Macy's, N. Y., vp, publ dir 
Harold Cabot, Boston, acct eec 
Stamps, Conhain, Whitehead, L. A., 

creative head 
Rogers & Smith, N. Y., vp, eastern mgi 

Emil Mogul, N. Y., research dir 
I.. J. DuMahaut, Detroit, acct exec 
Harold (allot, Boston, acct exec 
Biow, S. F., media dir 



Richard G. Montgomery, 
acct i mi 



Portland Ore., 



Federal, N. Y'., mgr sis prom dept 



Holland American I offee Co, N. Y., sis re|i 

Harold (allot. Boston, acct exec 

ton, \ ^ ., mdsg, media 
dir 



\\ asey, L. A., acct 
Southern States Cooperative, Richmond 
Va., adv, prom hi ail 

1. T. Cohen, Wash 



Same, exec vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp, radio dir 

Raymond L. Sines, S. F., acct exec 

Same, radio, TV dir 

Morey, Humm & Johnstone, N. Y\, vp 

Elliott Nonas, N. Y'., media dir 

liyrde, Richard & Pound, N. Y'., acct exec 

Cowan & Dengler, N. Y., vp 

Henry von Morpurgo, L. A., acct exec 

Simmonds ci Simmonds, Chi., vp, acct exec 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N. Y., radio, T\' prodn 

supei v 
Weiner, S. F., vp 

BBD&O, N. Y-, acct exec for Swan Soap 
Henry von Morpurgo, L. A., acct exec 
Klau-Van Pietersom-Dunlap, Milw., acct exec 
Young & Rubicam, N. Y., vp 
Same, vp 
II. ( . Mollis, H'wood., acct exec 

Schwimmer & Scott, Chi., acct exec 

Tullis, H'wood., in chge TV dept 

Same, media, market research dir 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

J. J. Weiner, S. F\, media dir 

Cole i\i Werner, Omaha Neb., vp, acct exec, mdsg mgr 

Foote, Cone & Belding, L. A., acct exec 

J. B. Taylor, Dallas, acct exec 
Same, vp 

Simmonds & Simmonds, Chi., acct exec 
Harry Feigenbaum, Phila., radio, TV dir 
Robins. Newton .V Chapman, H'wood., vp 
Robert Hilton, N. Y., acct exec 
Walsh, Montreal, radio dir 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 

Robins. Newton & Chapman, H'wood.. vp 
Robins, Newton & Chapman, H'wood., vp 

Same, v p 

Simmonds Ai Simmonds, Chi., acct exec 

Same, TV dir 



IOWA WOMEN SPEND 5% HOURS 



PER DAY WITH RADIO! 




J\ recent New York University Survey 
reveals that the average American adult 
listens to the radio 12 to 14 hours a 
week. 

Iowa women listen to their radios an 
average of 5 hours and 25 minutes each 
weekday — or more than a third of their 
waking hours! In the State's largest 
cities, the figure is 6 hours and 26 min- 
utes; on farms, it's 5 hours and 40 
minutes. 

Throughout the State, men listen less 
than women, hut even they spend 3 
hours and 28 minutes per day at their 
radios! 

These and many other valuable facts 
about Iowa radio listening hahits are 
taken from the 1948 Edition of the 
famed Iowa Radio Audience Survey.'"' 



Write to us or Free & Peters for your 
free copy. Your request will also reserve 
for you a copy of the 1949 Survey, to 
be published this Fall. 

--,',- The 1948 Iowa Radio Audience Survey is a "must" 
for every advertiser, sales, or marketing man who is 
interested in the Iowa sales-potential. 

The 194S Edition is the eleventh annual study of radio 
listening habits in Iowa. It was conducted by Dr. F. 
L. Whan of Wichita University and his staff, is based on 
personal interviews of 9,224 Iowa families, scientifically 
selected from cities, towns, villages and farms. It is 
universally accepted as the most authoritative radio sur- 
vey available on Iowa. 

WIHI® 

+/©r Iowa PLUS + 

Des Moines • • . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
£->v P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 
National Representatives 



15 AUGUST 1949 



II 




Shoe business looks to good -fall. 
Industry 80°o employed now 

l!;ili\ continues to need shoes, and women, despite the 
heal, are thinking of fall footwear, so 80% of Massachu- 
setts shoemakers are working these days. This improved 
condition is true, according to Commerce Department, 
in the West, too. It isn't entirely the war-produced crop of 
youngsters and their mothers that are entirely responsible 
for increased demand for shoes. Industry is once again 
promotion-minded and has increased its advertising sub- 
stantially during past three months. While television is 
looked upon as a great shoe-selling medium, it's radio 
advertising that's being bought. 

Washing-machine sales continue good, 
heating units also on upward swing 

Despite die heat this summer, sales of heating units and 
washing machines were higher in June and July than they 
were during any other two months in year. Saturation 
type of broadcast advertising by firms such as Bendix 
and Norge is said to have contributed substantially to the 
washing-machine demand. Low-priced housing, with wash- 
ers as basic equipment, also helped maintain peak demand. 
A good part of that low-priced housing was also radio-sold. 

More dollars from magazines and newspapers 
being sought by Post-office Department 

Anti-advertising forces in Washington continue to try to 
hit publications with a high percentage of advertising con- 
tent through hills to increase from 300 to 600% the rates 
on second-class publications. Increase of other rates is 
being sought, but nothing like a 600 r < increase is being 
asked, except from advertising-supported publications. Ad- 
vertising still needs an efficient lobby. 

U. S. Census to cost $70,000,000 

and change nation's marketing habits 

IIh L950 census will cost the U. S. $70,000,000 plus, ac- 
cording to current estimates. When report is released it is 
expected to show greatest population increase in U. S. his- 
torj and in develop facts and figures that may change 
mam greal arms' marketing habits. 



Square dancing may help business — 
especially in blue-jean department 

Sweep of square dancing throughout U. S. may also bring 
increased business in blue jeans and other accouterments 
of swing-your-partner. WLS, Chicago's Prairie Farmer 
station, promoted together with the Windy City's Sun- 
Times and the Chicago Park District, a Square Dance Con- 
test Festival that surprised even pappy. New York's Square 
Dances on the Mall have been bringing out square dancers 
of all ages, and there's little question that dance-calling 
will be successful profession for the next 12 months. 
Dance crazes have always developed business for dress 
and undie manufacturers. Radio stations are scheduling 
more and more folk music for the squares. Senators call 
it "a return to the soil." Nobody knows why. 

Broadcasters fight trend of paying for 
rights to high-school sports 

High schools of nation, wanting some of the gravy that 
flows to colleges for broadcasting rights, are trying the 
same routine, it's reported by U. S. Department of Educa- 
tion. First group of broadcasters to rebel are the stations 
of the Iowa Tall Corn Network. Danger of "exclusively" 
contracts for sports events was highlighted by Paul Alley 
(NBC-TV) over a year ago. While Alley's worry was that 
TV newsreels might be barred from events, his plea for the 
open gate applies just as much to radio broadcasting. 

No TV freeze lifting for September. 
UHF hearings may go on and on 

Freeze of new television stations will not be lifted in Sep- 
tember as many TV factors have hoped. UHF allocations 
of the Federal Communications Commission will not have 
pleasant public hearings, and there will be little industry 
agreement on standards. FCC, to help TV, may have to 
unfreeze present band before completing hearings on new 
waveband. Reception in most markets may not be 100%, 
but there's little consumer objection to clarity. 

FTC is favorite bureau with 
Hill contingent 

Feeling that Congress would clip wings of Federal Trade 
Commission has flown out Hill windows. FTC is doing so 
many studies on monopoly that the Office Appropriation 
Bill added $100,000 to the Budget Bureau's estimates of 
FTC financial requirements. This means more intensive 
studies of radio commercials. Advertisers are warned to 
watch their steps next season. 

War-taxes could be removed if anti-tax 
manufacturers would use air time 

While full-page newspaper advertising is being used by 
groups that want war taxes removed from many lines of 
products, it isn't producing results — too much small type 
and no human interest in the copy. Feeling is that personal 
appeal via air, direct into home, would move voters to tell 
Congress to get moving. With editorializing permitted, this 
could be done in a big wav — without even trying, if manu- 
facturers really wanted to use part of their airtime for this 
purpose. 



12 



SPONSOR 




daytime 
television 



Du Mont 



E V I s 




T w 



COPYRIGHT 1949, ALLEN E. DUMONT LABORATORIES, INC. 



If you want to reach the housewife, dayt/me 

television must occupy an increasingly important 
place in your plans. Daytime television is doing a 

job for many advertisers, at a very modest cost. 
Surveys show that when television comes into 

the home, radio is neglected*— and the television 
antennas are sprouting thick as corn in Kansas. 
Du Mont is your logical contact on daytime television, because: 
Du Mont pioneered daytime television. 

Du Mont has developed the daytime programs. 
Du Mont has the daytime network coverage. 

*We would like to furnish you these facts. 

Write or phone the Du Mont Network Research Department. 



America's Window on the World 



515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. Phone MUrray Hill 8-2600 



15 AUGUST 1949 



13 



for profitable 
selling - 

I NVESTIG ATE 



; 




Represented by 




ROBERT 



MEEKER 



A S S O 

New York 
San Francisco 



C I A 



T E S 

Chicago 
Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




>/r. Sponsor 



•#. it. Beitaire 

Vice-President in charge of 

Sales and Advertising 

Frank H. Lee Company, Danbury, Conn. 



Jack Beitaire is a soft-speaking person whose friendly, courteous 
instincts don't happen to interfere in the slightest with doing his job. 
He'll say yes — or no — quickly, and keep on saying it any number of 
times. Some people call him stubborn. Others who claim to know 
him better say. rather. "Jack has confidence in his own judgment." 

Decision of the Lee organization to drop the radio program of 
controversial Drew Pearson wasn't easy. The famous "I predict — 
commentator had lifted the Lee trademark from comparative obscur- 
ity to one of the best-known names in America. When the companv 
decided the rambunctious partisanship of Pearson's "causes" might 
not always be good for Lee hat sales, chief salesman Beitaire gently 
escorted their crusader to the edge of the felt-covered plank. 

Beltaire's new radio salesman, screen star Robert Montgomery, 
is as suave — and is scheduled to be as non-controversial in his com- 
mentary — as Pearson was blunt and partisan. As for talking about 
the efforts made to find a meeting ground with Pearson. Beitaire 
merely shakes his head and insists his only job is selling hats, not 
writing history. Selling hats probablv comes as natural to Jack 
Beitaire as climbing trees to Tarzan. He was born in Danbury. 
Conn., home of Lee hats and a center of Americas hat-manufacturing 
industry. In 1913. at the age of 19, he went to work for the rlawes- 
Von Gal Hat Co. Lee got him two years later. He was with them 
for 24 years, then the John B. Stetson Co. in Philadelphia lured him 
with an offer to direct the selling of its famous line. Six years later 
he came to New York to head up advertising and sales for Lee. 

With a radio budget of $4,000 a week and Dale Carnegie on 
Mutual. Beitaire embarked on network broadcasting in 1943. Two 
years later, he was spending SI 1.000 weekly for the Pearson package 
and breathing a little faster as his sales curve began moving steadily 
in the direction that was to change his entry from an also-ran to a 
championship contender. He will spend in the neighborhood of 
S700.000 foi advertising this year, about twice ukit he spenl in 
1935 when Lee started out to promote its own label. He thinks 
mens hats need more "romance" and "glamor," and that Bob 
Montgomerv will help impart that feeling to Lee chapeauv 

* William II. Weintraub i< at left 



14 



SPONSOR 



REPUTATION 



44Ame& 



REPETITION 



. . . AS TELEVISION MARCHES ON IN TEXAS! 




NEW HOME of both 
WOAl and WOAI-TV 



SAN ANTONIO . . . plus thousands 
of other people throughout South 
Texas . . . eagerly await their first tele- 
vision station, WOAI-TV. It will be 
here before the end of the year! 

WOAI-TV will be launched with 
several advantages: 

It will be operated by the same 
management that in nearly three dec- 
ades of AM Radio has molded WOAl 
into one of America's leading stations. 

WOAI-TV will be under the guid- 
ing hands of experienced television 



personnel ... in engineering, pro- 
gramming and production; in other 
departments by a staff trained through 
years of AM service. 

Thirdly, it will be in TEXAS, where 
big things have a habit of growing 
even BIGGER! 

Reputation of WOAl, known and 
respected from coast to coast, will be 
a precious heritage of WOAI-TV. This 
reputation assures REPETITION in 
the life of its bounding new baby 
brother, WOAI-TV! 



CHANNEL 




SOUTHLAND INDUSTRIES 



TEXAS 






15 AUGUST 1949 



15 



Aeir <hr< ht/um in s on SM*0\S0il stories 



p.s. 



SeG: "How banks use radio." and " A bank 
turns to TV" 

Issues: December 1947, p. 20; October 
1948. p. 32 

Subject: What opportunity for both sell- 
ing and public service does TV 
hold for banks and financial ad- 
vertisers? 

With some $200,000,000,000 stashed away in U.S. savings 
accounts, employment back to 59 million, and business 
loans once again on the way up, the nations banking 
houses and financial advertisers are again finding that 
broadcast advertising can better their business. Lately, 
this has been particularly true in TV, with well-publicized 
TV successes of banks like Boston's Shawmut and New 
York's Bowery Savings acting as a spur. 

Well-planned visual advertising for banks is no big- 
citj monopoly. One of the outstanding bank sponsor- 
ships in the visual medium is the weekly half-hour pro- 
gram. Salute To Wisconsin, of the Marine National Ex- 
change Bank of Milwaukee. The program, seen on WTMJ- 
TV, Milwaukee, is productive of very good public rela- 
tions for the sponsor, and has been instrumental in land- 
ing some blue-chip industrial accounts for the Marine 
Bank, although the costs of the show easily top the 
sponsor's previous ad budgets for all other media. Marine 
Bank got into TV shortly after WTMJ-TV went on the 
air, at the urging of its aggressive agency, Cramer-Kras- 
selt. which saw the value in building up its client's good- 
will via the visual air. 

Salute To Wisconsin is basically a show that salutes 
in turn the leading businesses of the state I Allis-Chal- 
mers, Wisconsin Dairy Industry, etc. I bv telling the 
story of the growth of leading companies in these indus- 
tries. Talent is drawn largely from the company being 



saluted, and gives the show a folksy, home-spun flavor 
that makes it popular with both viewers and top-manage- 
ment at the big firms being featured. Unlike many fin- 
ancial advertisers. Marine Bank promotes its broadcast 
advertising heavily in newspapers, displays, and so forth, 
with such results as the long waiting-list of firms seeking 
to be on the show, and requests from other banks for 
permission to use the format in other markets. 



p.s. 



See: "The automotive picture" (Part one) 
IsSUe: 14 March 1949, p. 21 

Subj 



ect: Willys-Overland uses 
farm and rural-appeal 
boost Jeep sales. 



selective 
radio to 



Although there is a sporty-looking Jeep convertible, 
designed primarily for the college-and-country crowd 
and for sunny climates, the various civilian versions of 
the familiar wartime vehicle — station wagons, pickup 
trucks, small utility trucks — do their best business in 
the non-metropolitan areas. The Jeeps, sold as "America's 
most useful vehicles,'' serve a real function on farms and 
in rural areas. 

Many years ago, Willys-Overland was in network radio, 
with no great success. Recently, after some limited na- 
tional selective campaigns in radio to further the new 
line when it was introduced last year. Willys-Overland 
began a pilot operation to sell Jeeps via broadcast ad- 
vertising aimed at farm markets. The program vehicle 
used is one of the most popular folk-music shows in radio, 
the WSM (Nashville) Grand Die Opry, with Willys-Over- 
land sponsoring a 15-minute portion of the show every 
(Please turn to page 36) 



W IT'S THE FACTS 









111 

Ml 
Si 



WOV believes that facts in radio are as im- 
portant as facts over radio. That's why WOV 
has and is continuing to make thorough, accu- 
rate studies on each of 5 AUDITED AUDI- 
ENCES. That's why both advertiser and agency 
can know exactly who is listening when you 
buy WOV. That's why sponsors on WOV know 
that on WOV 



Wake Up New York 
1280 Club 
Band Parade 
Prairie Stars 

Italian language market 
2,100,000 individuals 
(larger than Pittsburgh). 



RESULTS IS THE BUY-WORD 



Originators of 



RALPH N. WEIL, Gen. Mgr. 



The Boiling Company, 
National Representatives 



NEW YORK 



16 



SPONSOR 




. ll roads on the coast lead to ABC markets. 
Olympia, capitol of Washington, is just one of 42 Coast 
towns where ABC has 50% or better BMB penetration 
(73% of its radio families are regular ABC fans). 



y far the easiest route to Stockton is via ABC. 
For BMB proves that 78% of the radio families in this 
California canning center are consistent ABC listeners. 
Inside AND outside, you get all the towns on ABC. 




an't miss the way to Ventura on your sales map 
if you study BMB figures. They show 72% of this sea- 
side oil center's radio families are regular ABC tuner- 
inners. So if you're mapping a Coast campaign, let an 
ABC representative help you find the right road. 



On the coast 
you cant get away from 

ABC 

FOR COVERAGE . . . ABC's booming Pacific network 
delivers 228,000 watts of power— 49,250 more than the 
second-place network. This power spells coverage — 
ABC primary service area (BMB 50% or better) covers 
96.7% of all Pacific Coast radio homes. And ABC's 
Coast Hooper for 1948 was up 9% or better both day 
and night. 

FOR COST... a half hour on ABC's full 22-station Pacific 
network costs only $1,228.50. Yet you can buy as few 
as 5 stations for testing or concentration. And ABC 
is famous for the kind of audience-building promotion 
that helps slice the cost-per-listener. 

Whether you're on a coast network 
or intend to be— talk to ABC 



ABC 



PACIFIC NETWORK 

New York: 7 West 66th St. • TRafalgar 3-7000 — Detroit: 1700 Stroh Bldg. • CHerry 8321 — Chicago: 20 N. Wacker Dr. 
DElaware 1900— Los Anceles: 6363 Sunset Blvd. • HUdson 2-3141— San Francisco: 155 Montgomery St. • EXbrook 2-6544 



15 AUGUST 1949 








udience promotion: 

Fall 1949 



Networks fight to build listening 



$p»r~?~-, S All lour networks and most network affiliates 
tSCJ ||f will be fighting fast and fin iou>[\ foi listeners 
vW* % this fall. In the past, the battle has been be- 
tween CBS and NBC, with the other two webs taking a nolo 
contendere stance. This year both ABC and Mutual are 
spending promotional dollars, and while MBS hasn't the 
bankroll to compete with the other three chains, it has plans 
to marshall its 500 stations into a merchandising force 
which may enable it to compete without coin of the realm. 

CBS gets its promotion under way in the middle of 
August. A great deal of dependence is being placed upon 
on-the-air promotion, such as Amos asking Andy where 
they am, and Andy answering, "We'se on CBS, the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System." Practically all of CBS' names 
will be making the network breaks and selling the idea that 
"this fall hear them all on CBS." 

NBC started its fall on-the-air promotion the last week 
in July. Since the Ethel Merman and a number of other 
top-flight NBC programs were getting their feet wet this 
summer for fall audiences, NBC decided that it was a good 
idea to start selling them in the good old summertime. 

NBC is placing great dependence on its on-the-air unit, 
which should make Jules Herbuveaux, former NBC Mid- 
west program manager, at least a little bit happier than he 
has been during the past ten years. Herbuveaux, now 
Chicago TV manager, spent untold hours preaching the 
need of broadcasting's using its own medium to sell itself. 
Not only is it making station-break announcements avail- 
able, but it also has fond hopes for two promotional pro- 
grams devoted to selling what NBC makes available. These 
programs are Encore, a reprise of top moments from net- 
work broadcasts each week, and Curtain Call, another col- 
lection of highlights of NBC programs. 



NBC's empty plastic case symbolizes promo- 
tional problem faced by networks and stations 



\ r » / iro Hi p rn in o t i o n a I 
th in I; in t/ I in- full 

ABC 

The Ed Noble network knows that 
1949-1950 presents its 
greatest challenge to date. It's 
out to prove that U. S. Steel 
made a mistake when it shifted, 
and that despite program 
losses it still delivers a top 
low-cost audience. 



CBS 

"This fall, hear them all 

on CBS" is the rallying promotional 

cry of Columbia. Seldom in the 

history of broadcasting has 

there been such affiliate 

willingness to go all out 

to work with a chain. 

It's a Columbia year to crow. 



MBS 



Mutual's new president has given 
MBS new promotional life. 
The network will focus its 
revived attack on "Queen for 
a Day," the Sunday mystery 
block, the World Series, and 
its kid programs. Mutual may be 
the merchandising network yet. 



NBC 



A multiple-page "Life" advertisement 
sparks the senior network's fight 
for continued listening acceptance. 
With the greatest "on the air" 
promotion in network history 
NBC wants to prove that good 
listening isn't all names. 
There's a new drive at NBC. 



Getting on-the-air promotional ma- 
terial to stations in the past has been 
an expensive and tedious job. The 
pressing and distribution of a single 
promotional record ran to $400 per 
unit. Thus it was a $10,000 annual 
expense. Today it's a tiny fraction of 
this. The networks, all of them, play 
the star station-break announcements 
on the closed circuits*, the stations 
record them off-the-line and thus, at 
practically no cost, have disks ready 
for air promotion. 

This development is even more im- 
portant than a cost-saving device. A 
star can be picked up from Hollywood, 
Chicago, or any place where she may 
he on tour, recorded, and then at the 
promotional moment fed the stations 
via the closed circuit. The announce- 
ment can be as timely as a weather 
report. 

A disk being received in the mail 
will seldom have the impact of a star 
announcement included in a closed- 
eiieuit presentation of a campaign. The 
networks are collecting upon the fact 
that the National Association of Broad- 
casting reported that 59' < of radio's 
listeners found out about new pro- 
grams via broadcast announcements. 

NBC, CBS, ABC will all be using 
magazine and newspaper space to sell 
their programs. NBC is basing its 
appeal on a day-by-day campaign, sell- 
ing each evening's broadcasting in that 
day's newspapers. Thus NBC ads are 
headed — "Today is Tuesday," "Today 
is Wednesday," etc. In each ad a 
legular evening's lineup will be fea- 
tured. NBC has found that radio logs 
have top readership and is following 
the illustrated log formula. 

CBS is hitching its wagon to stars. 
Having for years been virtuallv sans 
top program names and this year hav- 
ing a star-studded schedule, Columbia 
is making the most of its reshaped 
facade. CBS's fall promotion will 
feature its "Hear them all on CBS" 
appeal. The stars are being featured as 
CBS's, which in most cases they are. 
Some Columbia stations at its recent 
promotional meetings in New York and 
Hollywood (1 August and 8 August t 
testified that CBS had achieved the 
impossible. Listeners were asking the 
stations when the new CBS stars would 
be heard. In the past, surveys have 
indicated that listeners tuned programs 
first, wave lengths second, stations 
third, and webs last — if at all. 



The news coverage of CBS's "capital 
gains'" routine and the switch of so 
many stars within a vear has made 
dialers conscious of CBS as a star 
network. There is every indication that 
this is a temporary manifestation, just 
as for a few years Paramount Pictures 
meant top flight entertaiment on the 
screen. 

ABC will not do an over-all fall 
promotion. It will turn its promotional 
guns on Friday night (mystery block), 
Sunday night I give-away evening), 



RAD1\ 



* Material sent t<> stations via telephone 
lines but not broadcast. 




The entire October issue of "Radio Mirror" is de 



Thursday TV's schedule, and its kid 
block, Call of the Yukon, Sky Chief, 
and Jack Armstrong. 

In the past ABC has not put any 
promotional pressure on any special 
months during the year. This fall, 
however, ABC is out to prove that 
despite name-program losses, Theater 
Guild, Bing Crosby, Groucho Marx 
and others, it's still an effective net- 
work, delivering top audiences at reas- 
onable cost. 

ABC will use block promotion wher- 



I 



'/> TELEVISION 







Sirs -Color Pictures and Stories! 




"ma, its stars, its web. Watch CBS sell this publication 



ever possible. Having proved that half- 
hour children's programs hold audi- 
ences better than 15-minute strips, it's 
now going after bigger audiences for 
these half-hours with box-top competi- 
tions. With a $60,000 budget, ABC 
will run three "summer vacation" pro- 
motions. Each of the kid shows will 
have special 1950 vacation prizes tail- 
ored to the story lines of the shows. 
Yukon will send the contest winners to 
Alaska for two weeks — parents as well 
as juvenile winners. Sky Chief contest 
winners will tour the U. S., via air, as 
guests of Eddie Rickenbacker (Eastern 
Airlines). Jack Armstrong will send 
the winners of its contest to the Carib- 
bean countries — "the All American 
boy visits the Central American area," 
etc. ABC's kid strips have been build- 
ing steadily and it's time the network 
said it with boxtops, contestedly speak- 
ing. The contests will be hidden-word 
games, with the youngsters finding 
the words by listening to the programs 
and writing the usual 25-word "I like 
- because" tiebreaking sen- 
tences. 

ABC's multiple - block promotion 
won't get under way until the middle 
of September. The network has studied 
ratings, found that ratings start their 
upward climb around 15 September. 
and therefore sees no reason to spend 
money trying to change the trend. 

ABC, CBS, and NBC will all use 
space in Look this fall. ABC's sched- 
ule is two pages, CBS's 14, and NBC's 
13. These are time-for-space deals, the 
time being on the webs' owned and 
operated stations in the form of se- 
lective announcements. 

NBC is also using space in Life, on 
a cash-on-the-barrelhead basis. It is 
said to be the biggest single adver- 
tisement ever placed in this pictorial 
publication and, besides featuring NBC 
stars, lists every NBC station, one of 
the few times that a national network 
has bought space to advertise its affili- 
ates. 

ABC is stepping outside of the usual 
publications in which networks have 
used space to promote themselves by 
scheduling pages in Coronet and Es- 
quire. It will continue to use Life as 
it has before, but not to the extent that 
NBC is doing. However, in promoting 
its Friday night schedule, ABC will 
achieve the effect of multiple-page ad- 
vertisements in Life through a tie-up 
whereby sponsors of different Friday 
night shows will use the slogan planned 
(Please turn to page 44) 



lioa- a nvlaorl; 's affiliates una 
promotional material 



ON-THE-AIR PROMOTION (LIVE) 



Chain Break 
announcements ( 1 5-20 sec ) 

1 -minute 
announcements 

Disc Jockey 
plugs 

Commentator 
continuity 




ON-THE-AIR PROMOTION (TRANSCRIBED) 



12 20 second 
announcements 

One minute 
announcements 

Star 
interviews 

15 minute 
programs 

NEWSPAPER (1 -COLUMN MATS) 

14 line (I inch) 
42-iine (3 inch) 
70-line (5 inch) 
100-line (7 inch) 

NEWSPAPER (2-COLUMN I 

42-line (3 inch) 
70 line (5 inch) 

100 line (7 inch) 
150-line (10% inches) 

NEWSPAPER (LARGER MATS) 

% page (600 lines) 
(43 inches) 

Vi page (1200 lines) 
(86 inches) 






TTFI 



133 



Full page (2400 lines) 



122 ) 



NEWSPAPER (MISCELLANEOUS) 

'/ 2 -col. pix mats 
Ad layouts 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Cor Cards 




lb] 



53 



Taxi signs 
Billboards 

FILM TRAILERS 

I minute 
3-minute 
5-minute 




113] 



128 | 



112| 



r 



in 



129 



133 



DO YOU HAVE A RECIPROCAL TRADE DEAL WITH A 

LOCAL 

NEWSPAPER? 






The Spirt slant 



Bottle tops are money 
when kids start bidding in the studio 




It wowed 'em in San Bernar- 
dino, and jumped Squirt 
sales in that California town 
to new mid-winter highs. It laid 'em 
in the aisles in Canton, Ohio, and 
added 30 new outlets for the local 
distributor in just five weeks, enabling 
him to sell his business later at a sub- 
stantial profit. 

. . . But it laid an egg in — well, in 
towns where it should have done just 
as well. 

The recent experience of the Squirt 
Compan) with Bids From The Kids 
in a ten-market 13-week national selec- 
tive test run proves again an old radio 
adage with merchandising men. There 
really isn't any such thing as a fool- 
proof formula for a locally-handled 
and produced radio promotional show. 
Real results too often come only when 
the station involved goes out of its 



22 



way to do a high-pressure campaign, 
and knocks itself out to keep up a 
steady stream of local-angle gags and 
gimmicks to maintain a high level of 
audience interest in the program. 

It was a tough lesson for the rela- 
tively-new Squirt Company to learn. 
The Squirt firm, a soft-drink concern 
that does an estimated yearly business 
of sl0,000,000 from its Beverly Hills 
(California) headquarters, is a firm 
believer in advertising. Through its 
350-odd bottlers, the company markets 
"Squirt," a carbonated grapefruit 
drink, on a national basis. To keep 
sales rolling, as well as to open new 
outlets and expand distribution. Squirt 
spends just under $500,000 yearly for 
advertising in radio, outdoor, and 
printed media. A good deal of Squirt 
advertising, as it is for firms like Coca- 
Cola. Seven-Up. Dr. Pepper, etc., is on 



a cooperative basis with the company 
and the bottlers splitting the costs on 
a sliding scale. Squirt had edged into 
several markets in a big way by earh 
1949. and was giving some of the older 
and more-established bottling concerns 
a run for their money. Since it was a 
^lightly tart drink and a good mixer 
lit makes a very tasty Tom Collins i. 
it did its best business with adults. 
In the bottling business, a multi-million 
dollar industry with few illusions, 
Squirt was considered as a drink for 
grown-ups. In the early weeks of I'M' 1 
Squirt decided to see if they could do 
something about it. A vehicle of Borne 
kind was needed to do a big promo- 
tional job on the younger soft-drink 
Inn ers. and to make them conscious of 
the product. 

Squirt and its agency. Harrington, 
Whitney & Hurst (Los Angeles), felt 

SPONSOR 



fREE 



K*" . ^,i TO 



\ou 







»\ 

\ 
\ 
\ 
\ 

ust \ 

\ 




ltif\& 




EVERY 
SATURDAY 
STARTING 



KIDS/ 

SAVE YOUR 
SQUIRT BOTTLE CAPS 

use them to buy lots of 

Swell-Exciting Prizes 

at the NEW Radio Show 
"BIDS FROM THE KIDS" 



Coprn«ht 1949, 
The Squid Company 



Kids in the audience bid for Prizes with Squirt Bottle Cops 

AND 



LISTEN TO 



COME TO 



HERE ARE SOME OF THE SWELL BIG PRIZES 



News that Squirt bottle tops are worth money was brought to young- 
sters in each area by newspaper advertising. The ads sent the teen- 



age and under population to Squirt dealers for tickets to "Bids from the 
Kids." Prizes (picture on left page) created a strong collecting desire 



that they had found what they wanted 
when they were presented with a 
"package" idea by the Hollywood radio 
firm of Ralph J. Rowe Productions. 
The show was Bids From The Kids, a 
sort of juvenile air auction-and-quiz 
show whose basic gimmick was that 
kids would have to save ( in this case) 
Squirt bottle caps in order to bid dur- 
ing the program for merchandise 
prizes. Both client and agency went 
for it in a big way, figuring that the 
multiplicity of brand-name mentions 
("Who will bid 100 SQUIRT BOTTLE 
CAPS for this wonderful, genuine, 
terrific . . . ") would give them high 
sponsor identification and added direct 
sales, in addition to usual sales results 
obtained from radio programing. 
Squirt was no newcomer to broadcast 
advertising. It had, and still does have, 
as SPONSOR goes to press, a selective 
campaign running nationally, with e.t. 
station breaks and announcements on 
over 300 stations. 

San Bernardino, California, a citrus- 
growing town of 60,000 people that 
nestles at the foot of a spur of the 
Sierras, was selected as the pilot opera- 
lion for a six-week test. For one thing, 
it was near enough (60 miles) from 
Los Angeles to let the home office of 
Squirt get fast reports on how Bids 
From The Kids was doing. The local 
bottler, Reeder and Douglas Bottling 



Company, was lined up, and the pilot 
operation started. 

Squirt's locally-produced show, Bids 
From The Kids, went on the air 12 
February 1949, being carried on the 
San Bernardino ABC affiliate, KITO. 
A large hall was needed, so arrange- 
ments were made to house the weekly 
show in the local American Legion 
Hall. At that time, Squirt had only 
8.7% distribution in San Bernardino, 
even though that figure accounted for 
some 65% of the grocery outlets in 
town. 

Meteorologically speaking, Squirt 
couldn't have chosen a worse time of 
the year to start the San Bernardino 
operation. For a week before the first 
airing on 12 February, it had rained 
a cold, steady drizzle. Then, while the 
Chamber of Commerce tried not to 
notice, it snowed in California. As if 
this wasn't enough, there was only time 
to get in one fast week of newspaper, 
radio, and dealer-window promotion 
beforehand. It seemed as though the 
breaks were against Squirt. 

Being a test run, no heavy pressure 
was exerted by the firm or bottler on 
the dealers to stock up, in the event that 
the show didn't continue. The first 
show and those that followed for the 
next five weeks received only a light 
promotional backing, rather than the 
heavy type that radio experts feel is 



called for with a show of the Bids 
From The Kids type. Format-wise the 
first show revolved around the idea of 
awarding prizes to the kids who could 
bid for them with the greatest number 
of Squirt bottle caps. Included also 
were some variations on this theme, 
such as spelling bees, riddle games, and 
a "Mystery Phrase" telephone call to 
listeners at home. All the program 
gimmicks contained references to or 
use of Squirt bottle caps. 

At the close of the six-week run, 
during which attendance at broadcasts 
had been surprisingly high, the results 
were a real surprise to Squirt and its 
agency. Squirt distribution was up 
32.4%. Squirt volume was up 68.4% 
over the best and hottest week of the 
previous summer! 

Said the local Squirt bottler, Tom 
Douglas: ". . . give me six more weeks 
of this show, and Squirt will dominate 
the market." Added Douglas, little 
thinking that he was giving a Nostra- 
damic preview of things to come: "In 
questioning the children about where 
they get their Squirt bottle caps, one 
important fact came out — children are 
getting store owners to save Squirt 
caps . . . this means Squirt is getting 
top attention and push in the outlet . . . 
something that money can't buy." The 
dealers like it, too. "My sandwich and 
(Please turn to page 48) 



15 AUGUST 1949 



23 



CLA 




GENERAL 

1 he joiloutng are Sl'l timt cj2f£%* 
shouing ueekly ram bapta on 
These rates Ju not include 



IROADCASTING 

ling jtJuction of all appliiabl 



50 AM to 1 1 00 P.N 



/jh "i-iurday 



On* Hour / p 



Jd 



l/iime A 1 fill" 3 tlm«» 4 times 5 timet 

(WteBl pir wuk per week per week per week 

1m 00 JS40 00 $720 00 S900 00 $1050 00 



- . :T IT> c Hishf h>>iny.'4uM0ff $ hjiaittnfUQfl,! J 
Or ann>urueu—^ I /i iPMl ' -llffl" 

/lfl<^' iff M 

CLASS "B" 5 45 A.M. to 

Sunday through Saturday 



2> 51 <ki 
52 or more 
Half Hour 

1 12 wkt 
13 25 wkt 
24 51 wkt 
52 er moi 
Quarter 

112 wkt 
13 25 wki 
26 51 wkt 
52 or rnci i 
10 Ml.utei 

I 12 wki 
13 25 wki 
26 51 wki 
52 or more ■ 
5 Minutes 

1 12 wki 
13-75 wki 
26 51 wki 



270 00 
255 00 
240 00 

110 00 
162 00 

iy oo 

00 



416.00 
459.00 
432 00 

32400 
291.60, 



648 00 
61200 
576 00 

432 00 



810 00 
765 00 
720 00 



HotfV 



0D& 



>*£ 



r 



432 00 



120 00 
108 00 
10200 
96 00 

90 00 
81 00 
76 50 

72 00 

60 00 
54 00 



216 00 
194 40 
183 60 
172 80 

162 00 
145 80 
137.70 
129 60 



52 or mo-. *kt AfC™"' /JM° £0"*™ 144 

cD/-\T AuuAiiurcucurc 



108 00 
97 20 
80 < 
JO 



288 00 
259.20 
244 80 
230.40 

216.00 
194 40 
183.60 
172 80 

144 00 



160 00 
324 00 
306 00 
288 00 

2700O 
243 00 
229 50 
216 00 



r f { 



an °° 

• 162 00 

/froc 

00 



945 00 
892 50 
840 00 

630 00 
567.00 
535.50 
504.00 

420 00 
378 00 
357 00 
336 00 

315 00 
283 50 
267 75 
252 00 

210 00 
189 00 
178 50 
166.00 



6 tines 
per week 

SI 200 00 

1080 00 

1020.00 

960 00 

720 00 
648 00 
612.00 
576.00 

480 00 
432.00 
408 00 
384.00 

360 00 
32400 
306 00 
288 00 

240 00 
216 00 
204 00 
192 00 



SPOT ANNOUNCEMENTS 

) 45 A.M. to Midnight Sunday through Saturday 

(to be used within the period of one yejrj 

One-Minute Half-Minute /)/? 



One lime 
26 limei 
52 limn 
104 timei 
260 times 
500 Use 



S40 00 



4r £/ 



~jflrt a f 



20 00 



If 



d*&""".l e*** s 



30 
28 
24 00 



18 00 
1700 
16 00 



AGENCY COMMi«fON 

Icycommission to recognized advertising agencies on time charges 
and announcers' fees. 



jrjprr 



50 AM — 11.00 P.M. to 12 Midnight — 



One Hour 
1 12 wki 
13 25 wki 
26 51 wki 
52 or more wki 

Holf Hour 

1 12 wkt 
13 25 wkt 
26 51 wks 
52 or more wkt 
Quorter Hour 

112 wkt 
13-25 wkt 
26 51 wki 
52 or more wkt 
10 Minutes 

1 12 wkt 
13 25 *ki 
26-51 wki 
52 or more wki 
5 Minutes 

1-12 wkt 
13 25 wkt 
26 51 wkt 
52 or more wkt 




135 00 
121 50 
114 75 

108 00 

90 00 
81 00 
76 50 
72 00 

67 50 
6075 
57 38 
54.00 

45.00 
40 50 
3825 

36 00 



ywJ "fes m$ { 

218 70 \tf] WlO 



20655 
19440 

162 00 
145 80 
13770 
129.60 

121 50 
109 35 
103 28 
97 20 

81 00 
72.90 

68 85 
64 80 



275 40 
259 20 

216.00 
194 40 
183 60 
172 80 

162 00 
145 80 
13770 
129 60 

108 00 
97 20 
91 80 



364 50 
344 25 
32400 

270 00 
243 00 
229 50 
21600 

202.50 
182.25 
172.13 
162 00 



472 50 
42525 
401.63 
378.00 

315.00 
28350 
26775 
25200 

236.25 
212.63 
20061 
169 00 



765 00 
720.00 

540.00 
466.00 
459.00 
432 00 

360 00 
324 00 
306 00 
288 00 

270 00 
243.00 
279 SO 
21600 



tfkrf 



CLASS "C" M 

Announcements 



tilt**' L> /)rf fC " 

idmg^ft 2:00 AM -h<LnJ£j through Sam 
One-minute, $10.00 net? One-half minute, $ 




Saturday 

.50 net. 




JNTS,^ 



. on spot announcements. 



>CAL RETAIL^DISCOUNJJ 

-25'.' Uir"p7ogram time charges, #10' 

POLITICAL BROADCASTING 

One time rates apply. No discounts 



ANNOUNCERS' FEES 

Following are announcers' fees, fully commissionable for programs: Five- 
minute program, $-1.00, Ten-minute program, $5.50, Quarter-hour program, 
{7.00; Half-hour program, $14.00; One-hour program, $20.00. 



SOME ADVERTISERS LOOK UPON RATE CARD AS INVITATION TO ARGUE RATES TO DETRIMENT OF STATION AND SPONSOR 



You get what you pay for 



rife 



• Rate cutting is \ ieious. It 
not only infects the industry, 
in which it becomes a dis- 
ease, but it also hurts the users of 
the industry. Tearing up the rate 
card is not solely a postwar mani- 
festation. In hundreds of markets it 
has been the custom of secondary sta- 
tions to make "deals" with advertisers 
who have used substantial blocks of 



Violating the rato <*aril isn't good 
long-term practice 



time. Baseball sponsors, for instance, 
have seldom paid card rates for all the 
time the games have occupied on the 
air. This is also true of football, basket- 
ball, hockey, prize fighting, and a host 
of other sportscasts. It's understandable 
that package deals must be made when 
broadcasting rights are expensive and 
air time runs far longer than the usual 
l.vminute and half-hour period. Even 



networks set special rates when it 
comes to airing events that deliver au- 
diences and do not adhere to standard 
time periods. This is not tearing up the 
rate card, since there are no rates for 
time periods that extend beyond the 
hour on rate cards. Thus package 
rates for sporting and other "over- 
time"' events are not generally de- 
structive to the broadcast advertising 



\ 






»c-:; 



24 



SPONSOR 



structure. There are times when an ad- 
vertiser seeking the "best" possible 
deal will take a sports event to the 
least effective station in town and use 
the event to persuade the station to cut 
its time rates to such an extent that 
the advertiser is getting his time prac- 
tically for free. In the long run this 
isn't profitable for the advertiser, for 
one of two things happen. If the station 
has a fair spot on the dial and sufficient 
power to cover the market the adver- 
tiser desires to reach, eventually the 
station ups its package rate to the 
advertiser (after a year or two) and 
he's paying the same or the equivalent 
rate that he would have paid on a sta- 
tion with more acceptance at the start. 
If on the other hand the station hasn't 
the dial position nor the power to 
cover the market the sponsor desires to 
reach, the low time rate is expensive, 
since no matter what station a sports 
sponsor uses, his broadcast franchise 
usually costs the same. 

Nevertheless, cutting time charges in 
connection with season-long sports 
schedules is not too detrimental to ad- 
vertiser or medium. It is also under- 
standable in connection with satura- 
tion campaigns where the advertiser 
buys a great number of announce- 
ments, station breaks, or programs, 
to achieve an immediate acceptance 
for a product or an event. In the case 
of the latter type of advertiser, it's 
very often essential that blocks of an- 
nouncements be used to bring out 
the crowds. Motion pictures have 
found that saturation advertising is 
essential and so have circuses, fairs, 
and carnivals. Package rates for this 
type of advertising aren't as prevalent 
as package rates for sportscasts, but a 
recent survey indicated that 60% of 



the stations "would listen" to proposi- 
tions or blocks of announcements. 

With the exception of these two 
groups of users of air time, cutting 
rates is neither justified nor profitable 
to the advertiser or the station. In 
many markets today, there is an over 
supply of stations on the air. The 
newer stations either set out to do a 
pinpointed broadcasting job, cut rates, 
or go off the air. It is amazing how 
many stations are good broadcast ad- 
vertising buys, despite the fact that 
they invade markets which apparently 
were well serviced by old-established 
outlets. It is also amazing that fre- 
quently these new stations lead their 
markets in Hooperatings, despite the 
fact that they are sans network affilia- 
tions. An independent station manager 
stated recently that there were only 18 
major markets that couldn't stand an- 
other station in the area and even most 
of the 18 might justify another station 
if its operator determined in advance 
the segment of the market that he was 
determined to service, in advance of 
opening the outlet. 

What has happened in Memphis, 
Boston, Worcester. Hempstead' (L. I.), 
Seattle, St. Louis, and a host of other 
markets, proves that it's not necessary 
for a station to operate on a "price" 
basis in order to obtain business and 
to make broadcast advertising on new 
stations profitable to local merchants 
and national advertisers. 

An advertiser gets what he pays for. 
That has been proved for years in 
black-and-white, as well as in broadcast 
advertising. In a city in South Caro- 
lina, a station decided to ignore its 
rate card and go in for bargain-base- 
ment business. If offered announce- 
ments at 50 cents an announcement up 



to 50 words. The station took a num- 
ber of sponsors from other stations in 
the town, the advertisers took the 
money they "saved" and spent it in 
newspapers. 

The 50-cent announcements station 
can be heard, the newspaper advertise- 
ments can be read. What is disturbing 
one advertiser who switched is that 
with his current use of two mediums 
his business is still lower than it was 
when he spent his entire budget in 
broadcast advertising. He's spending 
$7.00 a week on the air (he formerly 
spent as high as $364.00) and he's 
spending $250 a week in black-and- 
white. With his agency making no 
money from broadcast advertising, his 
account in this town isn't getting the 
localized attention that it should. The 
art and copy for the newspapers are 
not what they should be, because the 
agency has to watch its production 
budget. This particular manufacturer 
is just about convinced that advertis- 
ing can't do him any good. (The sit- 
uation in South Carolina isn't dupli- 
cated in every market in which this 
advertiser places business but it's car- 
bon copied frequently enough to tear 
down the sales effectiveness of a siz- 
able amount of this manufacturer's 
business.) 

Even a Broadcast Measurement Bu- 
reau report for this town in South 
Carolina wouldn't help the advertiser 
too much. The station happens to 
have two programs with large listening 
audiences. Thus it will have a good 
once-a-week index figure. Advertisers 
will have to watch the multiple-times- 
a-week figures in order not to be 
caught buying bargain stations that 
are not listened to regularly. 

(Please turn to page 46) 



9 lives that don't pay off for sponsors 




time stretching 

isn't good for the sponsor. It 
may seem he's getting more 
than he pays for, while actually 
all he's receiving is a few extra 
words in a poor time slot 




"A" time tor "B" rates 

seems like>a good "deal." It 
isn't, for the sponsor who tries 
this device usually discovers he 
has "A" time with less listeners 
than a good "B" period 







tftl 



two for one deals 

are like all cut-price devices, 
simply a method by which sta- 
tion appears to be cutting the 
rate card but is really getting 
rid of unsalable time 




talent tor free 

is a favorite request of some 
sponsors. Some stations can't 
do it because of AFRA. Others 
won't give good free talent. 
You get what you pay for 



15 AUGUST 1949 



25 



PART TWO 



OF A SERIES 



Dealer cooperative advertising 



I li«' advertising ageney's job i> I o bridge the ga |» 
between \\ li.il I In- iii.iiiiiI.h I hi <i wants .mil the dealer must have 



®A manufacturer-dealer (oi 
distributor) cooperative ad- 
vertising campaign can lose 
a lot of steam if it gets caught between 
clashing objectives of manufacturer 
and dealer. This is one of several 
points at which the contribution of 
the national advertising agency can 
make co-op ad-dollars do more work. 

The astute manufacturer realizes hi> 
first obligation to himself and his re- 
tailers is to see that his broadcast and 
other advertising creates consumer 
acceptance for his product. Ordinarily, 
he alone is in a position to point out. 
through advertising, the differences be- 
tween his product and others and ex- 
plain their comparative advantages. 

Further, most manufacturers are 
strictly interested in building up the 
prestige of their names and their 
brands. It's easy to forget the indi- 
vidual objectives of local retailers. At 
the other extreme, a dealer may care 
nothing about adding to the glor\ of 
the original supplier — he'd like to 
make the name of Joe Doakes & Son 
mean something in his communiu. 
That's a big item in his estimate of 
bow to move goods from his shelves. 

Of course, the smart retailer will 
point out. so far as practicable, the 
major advantages of the products he 
advertises. This, however, jzives him 
no advantage over other outlets that 
feature the same merchandise. So the 
retailer figures — if he figures at all — 
that he lia- tn (In more than sa\. "I've 

got it . . . I'll sell it for less . . . I'll 

give Mm longei terms, lower down 
pa) iiii-nt. bettei sen ice, etc." 

1 1 1- tendency . therefore, is to tr\ to 



make all advertising, including co- 
operative, build his own prestige first. 
'"Let the manufacturer scratch for 
himself. What does he care about me?" 
This feeling may be natural, but it's 
just as short-sighted as the view that 
would use co-op space and air time al- 
most exclusively to emphasize a prod- 
uct or its maker while the dealer gets 
poor-relation billing. 

This is where the producer's adver- 
tising agency can do a job- His account 
people can insure uniformity and con- 
tinuity in the advertising theme. The 
account executive is in the best position 
to keep the client sold on the necessity 
for allowing the local people enough 
leeway in promoting themselves. It's 
the agency's job to know how to strike 
a balance that will allow dealers to 
feel — and actually be — partners in the 
enterprise. The degree to which this 
is possible naturally varies with the 
product and the type of campaign. 

A competent agency can help safe- 
guard the good relations between 
manufacturer and outlets while main- 
taining at the same time the prestige 
of the client's brands. To accomplish 
this, as well as to see that retailers use 
best selling points and most effective 
methods of airing them, is by no means 
simple. Nevertheless, the agency is 
normally in the best position to show 
dealers the advantages to them in using 
agency-sponsored scripts, transcribed 
announcements, etc., or of following 
closely the copy and themes approved 
1>\ the agency specialists. 

It is not at all uncommon to see 
a product of the same manufacturer 
advertised in adjoining ana- with air 



copy so different one wouldn't recog- 
nize the brand as the same if the name 
didn't appear in the copy. It should 
be the role of the national agency to 
prevent this. 

The only solution that gets long- 
range cooperation and keeps dealer 
hi Mid-will is an educational campaign. 
The approach depends on the nature of 
the case. One way is to prepare printed 
material either for distribution by 
mail, or for use through field people 
if the manufacturer employs them. 
Agencies often find it advisable to rec- 
ommend area advertising meetings 
where these problems are thrashed out. 

Many manufacturers like to work 
only through their distributors in a 
co-op campaign. In this case, of course, 
the agency works directly with distri- 
butors, who are usually more ready to 
see the manufacturers point of view. 

Oil vttmpanivs «/<» tor sports 




Deep Rock and Richfield share costs of Stan Lom^' 



hree lloodman programs tor GE and Frigidaire 




a am MJABES I 
Frigidaire dealers can use "House of Mystery 

Long ago agencies discovered that 
to get the most out of point-of-sale 
material tying in with broadcast and 
other advertising the dealer has to be 
shown how to use it. This means the 
agency must work closely with the 
sales and merchandising people of the 
national advertiser in determining the 
best use of available ways to make 
merchandising efforts reinforce the 
media advertising. 

There is an argument for allowing 
distributors or retailers freer hand in 
writing their radio and newspaper 
copy. It runs like this: since each area, 
even each part of an area, has its own 
peculiar local conditions, the individual 
retailer, certainly the area distributor, 
is in a better position to exploit them 
than the manufacturer or his agency. 

Experience over a period of years 
(Please turn to page 38) 



General Electric outlets can present Duke Ellington 



Frigidaire retailers find "All Star Western" sells 



Keystone okays two NBC-Radio Recording platters 



neuiesrQMiz 

QmteandGetltl 





iv dealer-co-ops are well promoted 





MONDAY £(«* FRIDAYS l2»30/?w. 



•HEAR® OMSK 

UJRAUJ 



EYSTONi STORE 



Keystone's home office likes "Come and Get It" Prescott, "The Wife Saver," has Keystone's okay also 






V 



in BARRY WOOD SHOW 

Witk «i»C*«fr WXITIM4 



feft^'sto 1 








Ready-Built lo SELL lor Too 

As an AutHonrpd Keepsake Jew* 



Loins 



Eleven Ziv transcriptions are okay for Sincla 



Hotpoint okays "Korn Kobblers" and 18 others 



Keepsake Rings focus dealer appeal on two shows 



i 




for sponsors 



■Broadcast advertising «lo«'> not 
In ml ion al its b« k sl without CO list a 111 

nii n«*r vision ami controls 



over-all 



Research is insurance for 
broadcast advertisers. Mil- 
lions of dollars are wasted upon it an- 
nually. Even the finest of investiga- 
tion- into how to use radio and tele- 
vision effectively do not mean a thing 
unless the conclusions are acted upon. 
In at least half of the cases (that's 
conservative), research is bought to 
decorate the book shelves of advertising 
departments, and that's all. 

Both quantitative and qualitative re- 
search should be part of an\ broadcast 
advertiser's portfolio. Each has its 
place, each can be used to enhance the 
effectiveness of a broadcast advertiser's 
use of any air medium. Both can mean 
absolutely nothing unless they are used 
— and used intelligently. The need for 
understanding of what broadcast re- 
search means seems very self-evident. 
ye\ less than five percent of the firms 
using the air have a research man on 
their pay roll who spends any time 
analyzing the research data that they 
purchase. 

Schwerin, Nielsen, and both CBS 
ainl McCann ! i irk-on. in their use of 
the Lazarsfeld-Stanton program ana- 
lyzer, have been indicating for years 
that listener interest has dropped low 
during the commercial minutes of a 
program. \ct \<w little has been done 
to 1 1 \ to increase the attention-gaining 
qualities of the advertising message. A 
i" 'lit Btudj b) the University of Okla- 
homa indicated that farm commercials 
bad practical!) as much appeal for 
< ii\ listeners as the] had for fanners — 

and not too much for the rural folks, 

either. Nevertheless, information and 
mil data have been available for 



years which would have helped the 
writers of commercials, farm or other- 
wise, increase the effectiveness of their 
continuity. 

With the exception of the firms 
spending multi-millions on the air, 
media research is left entirely to the 
advertising agencies. At the agencies, 
except in a very few cases, research is 
a necessary evil, and one that f in 
radio I the creative staff would just as 
well operate without. If the creative 
men and women at agencies refuse to 
heed the advice of the researchers and 
research studies, the brow-wrinklers 
might just as well stop worrying. Much 
of their time is therefore spent on "new 
business" projects instead of on pro- 
jects aimed at making broadcast ad- 
vertising of their clients more effective. 
In other words, advertisers expect their 
agencies to research their use of broad- 
cast advertising (and other media, 
too), yet agencies' research depart- 
ments, even the best of them, are sel- 
dom able to put their findings to effec- 
tive use. 

The result is usually mediocrity. 
When a Kent-Johnson combination 
produces a Pepsi-Cola jingle that 
everyone whistles; when BBD&O comes 
forth with a Chiquita Banana that 
achieves nearly 1009? of sponsor ident- 
ification; and when Fibber McGee and 
Molly's Johnson Wax announcer 
achieves such acceptance that ever) 
time MolK or Fibber interrupts a com- 
mercial they get hundreds of letters 
asking them to leave poor Waxy alone, 
sponsors are amazed. They're amazed 
despite the fact that research has been 
available for years which pointed to 



the reasons why these announcements 
and the Johnson Wax formula are so 
successful. 

Broadcast advertisers first must be 
willing to use the research they buy. 
They must be willing to employ at 
least one man who knows what ratings 
are and what qualitative and quantita- 
tive research is about. They must also 
be willing to do somehing about re- 
search's recommendations. The head 




of an important research organization 
tells a story at his own expense which 
accents the need for understanding and 
doing something about research. He 
was employed for an eight-month peri- 
od by an important station. He was 
supposed to indoctrinate everyone at 
the station with the facts of radio re- 
search life. The day he came to work 
he was asked by the president of the 
station to explain "share of audience." 



20 



SPONSOR 



He did. Eight months later, as he was 
leaving the station at the completion 
of his assignment, he shook hands 
with the president. 

"Would you do me a favor?" asked 
the president. 

"Certainly," said the researcher. 

"What does 'share of audience' 
mean?" asked the station topper. 

The research man was so disgusted 
that he wanted to refund his eieht- 



hire the researcher, but also has to 
insist that the agency, program pro- 
ducer, advertising manager — in fact, 
the entire advertising team — work with 
the researcher. 

The first problem then is to have a 
broadcast research man or a general 
media research authority with the ad- 
vertising department — or at least with 
the client's agency. In the latter case 
it must be understood that the facts- 



the essence want Hooperatings and all 
of Hooper's various services in their 
research libraries. Others who are 
"circulation" minded want Nielsen's 
services. A few want both Hooper and 
Nielsen, but most marketing men real- 
ize that they can't afford them both. 
They wish that Hooper's City Hoop- 
eratings weren't old-hat when they're 
released, as are the figures of the 
Broadcast Measurement Bureau. They 




SPORTS and TELEVISION 



M*PPonoi 



"eei* 




L »*'««r 




HUNDREDS OF STUDIES ARE AVAILABLE TO SPONSORS. THEY DON'T NEED THEM ALL BUT DO REOUIRE SPECIALS MADE FOR THEM 



month salary. He wasn't that wealthy 
at the time, so he didn't. 

It is a safe conclusion that if every 
advertiser spending over $1,000,000 in 
broadcast advertising employed a radio 
research man who knew what both 
qualitative and quantitative research 
was all about, radio's effectiveness 
would be increased as much as 25% 
within a year. That must be hedged a 
little. The advertiser not only has to 

15 AUGUST 1949 



and-figures man at the agency will 
work with the account direct and not 
give it casual or absent treatment. 

The second problem is what research 
services should the radio advertiser 
buy? 

There are no two research men who 
will agree on a research portfolio. Most, 
however, will admit that at least one 
rating service must be in the portfolio. 
The men who realize that time is of 



feel that with radio and/or TV, it's 
throwing away money to operate with 
yesterday's figures. Only Program 
Hooperatings are indices of current 
broadcasting — every other service cov- 
ers yesterday's wash. Naturally, this 
does not apply to special studies, such 
as are made by CBS and McCann- 
Erickson via the Lazarsfeld-Stanton 
program analyzer, the Schwerin sys- 
(Please turn to page 42) 



29 




. 



an open letter to 
Bill Rine, WWVA... 



irr , 3 SB* 0PT1WISW 
3 ubject:^ d ^ 3.^. Hi- 

nt's sell °P UBi .dvertlsWe 

v. oU as** . UM a to me by ^gars If » n 



-T.t'e sell optics* adv ertlslng 

10U «»s outlined t° » £ n .aggers 1» ** 

*" «TS ^ AU'h tV**-""' ^f , martin 

ssrfflsu — • *»~ ttndled . ^j5»s: -*• 

that the idea »» ^ t8 me *i™ 
Campbell an op ti*ism via tn stations in*"* 

let's sell op afflflSBSSB^Snr^iS^ ^Snti««. suD, f r 

a ^^r-Aes^o-^S«rrrwi«ine66 *» 1 „ n eertam** » 4 «~ n t 



an* rearS -;;nfusl° n about radl ^^caaents . 

leld0 :?sing »e°^\ . in a series of ' »*££«., every 
advertising op umism in B ber of ^™!. r tment, 

gssr- 8 - o— .. 

fe "° ta beam! 



2. 



•e« on T„ flgnts for W»— cong2SgJ: 

fello* «*o fi 6 b eamea_al-^^rtrfore ; 

k_seriS£_2i-r-^5 are ava UBe r ox banW 

• Ca r p Ssestrlnes ^wsbory). 
^ 0S attCnlg*>est pea* 



* oo yo« **ve to ■»»' coiro onse»ee co»»«reial« a 

«hat do yo« campaign or o 

« «t behind an aggr 
, -f etatlona .Wj" f t e very»nere. 

^^ ' ....... campaign- ,_ , rt , 



Th e aiaHea are nlgn. 




feoR n UuCaTIO»S Inc. 



.leVa aeli opti»i*»" 
a . S ataUatic' % ~£?$~ - '^ '" 



# • # and all other 
station managers. 





The 

IMrkcil Panofl 
answers 
Mr. Freed 



Regarding the 
present contro- 
versy surround- 
ing the advertis- 
ing of liquor on 
the radio, the 
Distilled Spirits 
Institute, an or- 
ganization com- 
prising about 
70% of the dis- 
tilling industry, feels that this issue 
w as settled many years ago by its 
members. 

Shortl) following repeal of prohibi- 
tion, our members voluntarily adopted 
a code containing a number of pro- 
visions of public interest, one of which 
was a ban on radio advertising. This 
restriction, has been adhered to uni- 
formly throughout the years, not only 
by our own members but by the distill- 
ing industry at large. 

It is rather difficult to understand 
why this issue should flare up at this 
particularly inopportune time. After 
all, radio is not a new advertising 
medium. It has been available for a 
long time, and up to the present I 
know of no distiller who has attempted 
to use it for advertising liquor. 

However, since the issue arose, there 
has been much publicity and comment, 
and the inference has been, in some 
quarter-., that the liquor industry is 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"Does hard liquor advertising belong on the air?" 



Arthur Freed 



behind the move to get on the air. 
That inference I emphatically deny. If 
certain distillers who are not members 
of the Institute have made overtures 
in that direction, our organization as 
such has no direct control over their 
actions, but we definitely are not in 
accord with this attempt to upset a 
long standing precedent. 

I would like to refer interested par- 
ties to the letter sent by Senator Edwin 
C. Johnson, chairman of the Senate 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign 
Commerce, to John W. Snyder, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, protesting against 
liquor advertising on the radio. While 
Senator Johnson and our industry do 
not always see eye-to-eye, nevertheless, 
in his letter he raises a number of valid 
points in which we heartily concur. 

It is with pride that I can say that 
the distillers recognize fully the social 
implications of the industry, and with 
considerable foresight laid down cer- 
tain fundamental rules for its conduct 
and guidance which, throughout the 
years, have resulted in public accept- 
ance and good will for the industry. 

We realize that there is a strong 
organized minority that is fundamen- 
tally opposed to our industry, but 
through a proper appreciation of the 
public relations problems involved, we 
also gained the good will of a majority 
of the public. That good will me con- 
sider our most vauable asset. We defi- 
nitely are opposed to any move that 
will unquestionably stir up controver- 
sies, and upset the mutual relationship 
that we have established. 

Howard T. Jones 
Executive Secretary 
Distilled Spirits Institute 
Washington, D. C. 




President 

Freed Radio Corporation, New York, N.Y. 



As citizens we 
have allowed the 
beer and wine in- 
terests too much 
liberty to enter 
our homes by 
radio. Now the 
purveyors of 
whisky not only 
want a voice to 
hawk their wares, 
but even want to visualize users of 
their products to induce others to pur- 
chase and consume, and to lure others 
into conditions where danger impends. 
Who wants these radio voices picturing 
alcohol as necessary to a happy life? 
The abstainer? The social drinker? 
The excessive drinker? Nobody wants 
them except those who will profit fin- 
ancially, and that is the end sought for 
most advertising — sales to those who 
are not yet drinkers — larger sales to 
those who have started on the road. 
I might be more interested in whisky 
advertising on the air if the copy 
writers would produce the whole pic- 
ture — a silly, disheveled man or 
woman; a staggering man: coarseness, 
brawls, fights, disgusting as they are — 
for then young people could get a true 
picture of where liquor drinking might 
lead them. 

Children are now subjected to mis- 
leading claims for beer and wine. Why 
should they be forced to see and hear 
appeals for the use of whisky when the 
laws of our nation prohibit minors to 
purchase it? Multitudes today suffer 
untold misery because some voice on 
radio urged them to drink beer. What 
would be the story of many, after 
listening to "dressed-up booze," who 
pay the penalty of illness, degradation, 
and possible years in a hospital? 



32 



SPONSOR 



Instead of inviting more calamity by 
liquor advertising, let's clean up the 
radio and eliminate even beer and 



wine. 




Helen G. H. Estelle 
President, New York State 
W.C.T.U. 



Discussion of 
whisky advertis- 
ing on radio and 
television may 
serve to help 
clear up the ques- 
tion as to whether 
the medium of 
the air shall be 
subject to d i s - 
criminatory re- 
striction. The press regularly carries 
whisky advertising. Billboards, electric 
signs, and other outdoor displays are 
regularly used for whisky advertising. 
Car cards, posters, leaflets, and other 
forms of indoor advertising are regu 
larly employed for whisky. 

The point now is whether radio and 
television can be denied by subterfuge 
what they are clearly entitled to by 
law and the force of public opinion. 

It is true that the same minority 
groups who oppose whisky itself also 
oppose all forms of whisky advertising. 
However, their attempts to push re- 
strictive legislation through Congress 
have met with exactly the fate that 
would be expected when a minority 
tries to impose its will on the majority. 
The results show that the majority of 
the citizens of the United States meant 
it when they voted to change the con- 
stitution in order to make distilling a 
legal business in every sense of the 
word, and to enable the country to 
reap the benefits of a soundly-estab- 
lished and well-run industry. 

Today's facts bear out the wisdom 
of that action, for now the alcoholic 
beverage industry gives direct and in- 
direct employment to approximately 
1,700,000 men and women who re- 
ceive over $4,250,000,000 in pay, and 
operations of the industry account for 
nearly $3,000,000,000 a year in federal 
and state revenues. 
S. D. Hesse 
Advertising Coordinator 

Schenley Distillers, Inc., N- Y. 

* + + 

15 AUGUST 1949 



Watch the 
New WDSU 

No Other New Orleans Station 
Develops So Many New Personalities 
And Such Economic AM-TV Packages! 



RADIO 

'1280 Matinee" 

Dick Bruce (shown with 

Spike Jones) dispenses 

90 minutes of records, 

guest stars and wit. 

(Spof or Segment 
Participation Available) 




EDGAR B. STERN, JR. 
President 



ROBERT D. SWEZEY 
Executive Vice-President 



LOUIS READ 
Commercial Manager 



^cw^s^^mmr^j^M 



33 




WHAT'S HAPPENING 



t+l/ 



K-NUZ is the only station in the big 
Houston market that has a gain in 
share of audience in all three periods 
(morning, afternoon and evening). 
Hooper index April-May, 1948, 
against Hooper index April-May, 
1949. 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



Was 






Now 


Hooper 

April- 
May. 
1948 






Hooper 
April- 
May, 
1949 


Index 






Index 


6.6 


K-NUZ 
8:00 a.m. 


Morning 
12:00 Noon 


15.5 




K-NUZ 


Afternoon 




4.7 


12:00 Noon-6:00 p.m. 


10.2 


5.6 


K-NUZ 
6:00 p.m 


Evening 
-10:30 p.m. 


10.7 



MORNING 135% INCREASE 
AFTERNOON 117% INCREASE 
EVENING 91% INCREASE 



NATIONAL REP. FORJOE & CO. 
Dave Morris, Gen. Mgr. 

"Your Good News Station" 



k- 



nuz 



9th Floor Scanlan Bldg. 

HOUSTON 2, TEXAS 



RTS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS. 



—continued from page two- 
Public utilities get $6 more 
from TV set owners 

Electric bill of television set owners increases 
S6 yearly. Same survey that revealed this also 
indicated that one of four TV set owners felt that 
at least two sets were required per home. 

TV an aid to illegal bookmaxing, 
says Smith of Rockingham 

Newest reason for not telecasting sporting event 
is given by Lou Smith, executive director of Rock- 
ingham Park, New Hampshire. There's no TV in New 
Hampshire, but Smith insists that telecasts of rac- 
ing events are aids to illegal bookmakers. Smith 
uses WLAW, Lawrence, Mass., to broadcast two races 
daily. 

KIRO points out how to use 
radio's new editorial rights 

Indicative of what stations can do when they turn 
to editoralizing is case of KIRO, Seattle. Peti- 
tions for city-wide referendum to permit self- 
service gasoline stations were getting nov/here. 
KIRO felt city should have right to make its de- 
sires known on subject, went on air and told lis- 
teners where petitions could be obtained. Result: 
14,000 signatures in three days, v.here previous 
weeks had produced only 4700. 

Stations eye WWDC's routine of 
"buying" new spot on dial 

Some stations, successful on their own not-too-good 
wavelengths, are thinking of following lead of 
WWDC (Washington) . WWDC has filed for permission 
to buy W0L in its town, with intention of changing 
WOL's call letters to WWDC, and selling its own 
operation. Many stations with good dial spots 
are available for sale. 

WLW starts building separate TV 
and AM staffs at sales level 

WLW (Crosley) is following trend towards separate 
AM and TV operations. New sales executive in New 
York for Crosley is Ted Fremd, who will represent 
three WLW-TV affiliates only. 

CBS technical staff costs almost as low 
as six months ago despite rate increases 

Although CBS union (IBEW) won small increases, 
other concessions are said to have permitted 
Columbia to keep current technical staff costs down 
as low as they were six months ago. IBEW-CBS 
fracas almost reached strike stage, with CBS execu- 
tives spending one weekend in New York just in 
case . 



34 



SPONSOR 



HBkI 



< H 1 1 P 


ELL 


fuirnT 



I 
I 




Mr '0'v s ar e as f /r y 

Station c . " - • • 2.6 . • • 23 

St a'io n ..""""■• '•* . '''••• 21 

N °»- -4S~m ' ' ' L3 ■ . " '• 14 

<">d ?/, ay '«. />«/„ '■•••. .,. 



Represented by Radio Sales 



WFBL 

Syracuse, N.Y. 




4 outstanding participat- 
ing shows with ready- 
made audiences — emceed 
by 3 of the most popular 
radio personalities in 
Central New York. 

The Musical Clock 

7:30 to 9:30 A.M. Monday 
thru Saturday 

Coffee with Curtis 

9:35 to 10:00 A.M. Monday 

thru Friday 
10:00 to 10:30 A.M. Saturday 

Jim DeLine Show 

4:45 to 5:30 P.M. Monday 

thru Friday 
4:30 to 5:00 P.M. Saturday 

Dote with Decker 

6:15 to 6:45 P.M. Monday 
thru Friday 



Save Money 

by calling 




W F B L *B 

IN SYRACUSE . . THE NO I STATION 
WITH THE TOP SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
MORNING. AFTERNOON OR EVENING 



|I.N. (Continued from page 16) 

Saturda) night, 11:15-11:30 p.m. 

Commercials are aimed direct!) at the farmers in the WSM listen- 
ing ana and have a factual, no-nonsense air about them. They are 
well integrated into the established format of the show, and stress 
the performance, usefulness, price, and reliability of Jeeps. If the 
\\ SM-o'/'h/k/ <)!<■ Opry deal is a success, Willy-Overland and its ad 
agency, Ewell & Thurber, expect to expand their farm programing 
to other markets. 



|I.S 



See: Farm Programing and Case History Series 
(Parts one through eight) 



Issues 



Subject 




Farmers like many commercials; others 
make them avoid the product — definitely 



Farmers are quite discriminating about what they like and don't 
like in a radio commercial — and if the commercial is bad enough, 
that is. sufficiently disliked, farmers are more likely than most to 
refuse to buy the product advertised. These are some of the con- 
clusions in the third annual Radio Listener Survey just published 
1>\ the radio department of Indiana University under the direction 
of its head. Out of a dozen occupational categories listed. 
Agricultural, Forestry, and Fishery workers I of whom farmers 
made up more than 80%) ranked high among those who admitted 
there were radio commercials they found '"enjoyable. ' Percentage 
answering "yes" was 65.3, barely under the 65.5 of people in 
amusement and recreation fields. Most "yeses" (70.7) were from 
the personal service category; next were financial, insurance, and 
real estate (66.3). Fewer government workers admitted hearing 
any commercials they liked. The decisive attitude of farmers to- 
ward commercials is probably because each is actually heading a 
small business unit — selling talk means a lot to him. 

Farmers ranked second (16.0) to professional people 116.8) 
among those who claimed they were influenced by some commercials 
not to buy the product advertised. Listeners least likely to avoid 
products because of disliked radio commercials are financial, in- 
surance, and real estate workers, according to the Indiana survey. 
The strong likes and dislikes of farmers seem to carry over into 
letter-writing to stations and sponsors about programs. They top 
the list, along with professional and personal service workers, of 
those who say it on paper. 

Farmers seldom make requests for programs thev don't hear. 
This survey turned up the fact that farmers are least satisfied with 
the amount of local news they get. The survey doesn't answer 
whether that means farm or market news. Big-city listeners are 
more satisfied with the local news they get. The survev doesift 
reveal whether the) believe they get more and better local news, 
or whether the) are less interested in it than farmers. 

This study was done by Indiana Universit) radio students in 60 
cities and towns, 28 in Indiana, 11 outside Indiana, one in Canada 
during the Christmas holidays of December-January 1948-49. The 
cross-section of student home-towns was considered fairlv tvpical 
of the distribution of listeners throughout the country. The total 
sample was 1,957, of which 1.200 were in Indiana. The interviews 
were divided half-and-half between personal interviews and tele- 
phone calls. 



36 



SPONSOR 



-\ 




KEEP 



'Ogdensburg 

ST. lAWKNCf 



NEW YORK 



31 



40,000 recipes — some foreign, some local, all exotic — 
were requested from Mary Cherry and Howard Reig during 
the past year. Here is convincing proof that WGY home- 
makers realize happiness in the home depends in part on 
good food, pleasant surroundings and stimulating con- 
versation — the daily ingredients of the "Two's Company" 
show. 

WGY advertisers have also discovered the appeal of 
"Two's Company," now featured for a full forty-five 
minutes, Monday through Friday, 1:15 — 2:00 p.m. Open 
participations are scarce. Reservations are being accepted 
— make yours today. 



LIVING 
STON 



Geneva© 1 ^ 

YATfS J4 

ifQ 




OXFOKD 



CAIWOU 



GSAfJON 

23 

NEW 
HAMPSHIRE 

BEUNAP 

©lacorw'a 
Rochester^ 



Weslbrc 



Bidde 

YOSX 



* — v.«jr*mont 
NOTOMj t —> «, 

|*viNDHAM| CHfS CorscofcP 

i HH{ . HIUS 

SOKOUGH 

^Manchester* 



STKAFPOHL 

Dover® 

m 

Portsmouth/ 

ROCKINGHAM / 



MIOOtfSfX 



® MedforcU 

urg_ . .^ 




lams ©Green c, trr ,hur 

„.m,s„^MASS >' m ° n ^ 

eid © woecfsrfieNewtorr s, 

itp.on@ Nor,hamp,on -WORCESTER 1 



HrfKK K% h .® tf» 



eld® ©W. Spring 



(gSouthbridge 



f>lrMOI 



TOUAN0 WIND TpROVIOfNcA ®TaUflt 

HAM fewtucket^f" STO( 
HARTFORD Crtanston©f\\ ' 

'Will.man.ic® ©y^^p *^ 

®M,ddletown IfZ^WW^ 
rbury NEW^NolwichTONf v-( ^ 

DUI 



Our name is La Clair. We are one of 15,900 families that live in 
Otsego County. Last year the 3 of us spent $4000.00 for necessities. 
We listen to WGY and enjoy all the programs. Since I am the mother 
of our family I am the only one that is home at the time of day 
when "Two's Company" is on the air. Mary Cherry and Howard 
Reig are my favorites and often give me many new ideas for my 
home as well as new recipes. As a homemaker I feel that this WGY 
program is put on especially for me. 



, £> . o( Cs CXsCULft) 





A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



KEY TO SYMBOLS * Over 250,000 ■ 100,000 — 250,000 • 50,000 — 100,000 ® 25,000 — 50,000 ©10,000 — 25,000 O Under 10,000 



DEALER CO-OP 
i ( ontinued from pa i 

leach agem j people w i 1 1 1 numerous 
i ooperative campaigns to theii i redil 
to conclude that Beldom are there an) 
reall) important local conditions affect- 
ing the advertising oi a product that 
,i isn't the business "I a national 
ncj t < • know and tl><\ usuall) do. 
The Bame argument is sometimes 
used i" Bupporl the claim that regional 
or local agencies should be used for 
cooperative advertising, and Bome na- 
tional advertisers have employed them 



mi these grounds. The experience of 
Newell-Emmett, a New York agency, 

1- not unique. It discovered that a 
Midwest agency, brought into the pic- 
ture "because it understood the special 
problems 01 the region" was usin^ the 
Newell-Emmett theme and scripts bare- 
K disguised (the campaign was part of 
a country-wide effort for which Newell- 
Emmett had prepared the material). 
Another U. S. agencj amazed its 
Canadian branch 1>> coming up with 
pertinent facts about the area to be 
covered in a regional campaign — facts 
the Canadian unit didn't know. 



SURE, 



Ch 



some Chicago stations 

can be heard in South Bend 
. . . but the audience 

LISTENS 

to WSBT! 



There's a whale of a hig difference between 
"reaching" a market and covering it! Some 
Chicago stations send a signal into South 
Bend — but the audience listens to WSBT. No 

other station — Chicago, local, or elsewhert 

even comes close in Share of Audience. 
Hooper proves it. 




5000 WATTS • 960 KC • CBS 
PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
38 



The truth is that, barring very ex- 
ceptional instances, a competent na- 
tional agency can easily acquire any 
special information it needs. More im- 
portant, it already has what is most 
needed — a successful copy theme and 
tested copy. If important exceptions 
are necessary in some areas, it still 
doesn't require a local or regional 
agency to point them out. 

One case, familiar to national adver- 
tisers, does necessitate another agency's 
being in the act. If a retail store 
features several products, including 
those of other firms, on a radio show 
or in a newspaper ad, it is obvious 
that only the retailers own advertising 
department or agency can prepare such 
programs or advertisements. 

This situation is usually circum- 
vented by the sponsors confining fi- 
nancial participation to shows, an- 
nouncements, or publication space 
devoted soley to his own product or 
products. Where this isn't practical the 
sponsor has to rely on his program of 
educating outlets to the advantage of 
using the experience and advertising 
know-how of his agency. The least a 
manufacturer should do is have his 



BMI 



SIMPLE ARITHMETIC 

IN 

MUSIC LICENSING 

BMI LICENSEES 

Networks ... 23 

AM 1,982 

FM 409 

TV 80 

Short-Wave . 4 

Canada ... 1 50 

TOTAL BMI 
LICENSEES . . 2,648* 

You are assured of 
complete coverage 
when you program 
BMI-licensed music 

* As of August 4, 1949 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

580 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 19 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



SPONSOR 




RADIO STATION 



NEBRASKA 



KANSAS 



OMAHA 



OMAHA, NEBRASKA 
590 KC • NBC • 5000 WATTS 

Owner and Operator of 

KODY AT NORTH PLATTE 



There's no need to worry about the present 
or the future of this tremendous farm 
market served ONLY by Radio WOW. 
invest your advertising dollars HERE for 
immediate sales and long term gain. 



Note: WOW-TV begins commercial programming September 1 



John J. Gillin, Jr., President & Gen'l Mgr. 
Represented By John Blair & Co. and Blair-TV, Inc. 



IN THE 



RICH MISSOURI VALLEY 



15 AUGUST 1949 



39 




WHICH IS LARGER? 

(Black or White) 




IF YOU SAID M3V18- 

YOU'RE RIGHT! 

AND YOU'RE ALWAYS 
RIGHT WHEN YOU 

ADVERTISE 

»"XLhv 

BECAUSE XL STATIONS 

Get Kesults 



Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 

Sales Managers 

Wythe Walker Tracy Moore 



unabridged, up-to-date 

CONSUMER MARKET DATA 



The 1949-1950 Edition of CON- 
SUMER MARKETS organizes for easy 
use the latest and complete consumer 
market data available from govern- 
ment and other reliable sources for 
every state, every county, every city 
of 5000 or more; for the U. S. 
Possessions and Territories, Canada, 
and the Philippines. 

It gives you a specially designed, 
large-scale map for each state and 
each city of 250,000 or over. Stale 



'In use daily," soys agency 
executive. "We are rely- 
ing regularly on your 
county information to 
determine expenditures 
ond efforts of our 
clients.' 




maps show counties, cities, other 
marketing centers, and locations of 
daily newspapers and radio AM, 
FM, TV stations. 

It reports 1948 county and city 
retail soles for 9 commodity classes; 
retail sales potentials; retail and 
service outlets; estimated per family 
/per capita retail sales; farm and 
industrial activity data,- population 
estimates; households per sq. mi.; 
radio homes; average weekly wages; 
bank debits; ond many other 
mcrket factors. 

Published September 1st. $5.00 a 
copy. Sent on 10-day approval, if 
desired. Only 2500 extra copies are 
being printed. Reserve yours now. 



CONSUMER MARKETS 

Published by Standard Rate & Data Service, Inc. 

333 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois 

NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



agencj prepare sample material as a 
guide. Where the advertiser limits his 
participation to instances devoted sole- 
l\ tu his own products, the material 
for radio recordings and newspaper 
mats should he prepared in such a way 
that the manufacturer's message ap- 
pears in some part of the show, an- 
nouncement, or space in a manner that 
cannot be changed. Time or space can 
be left for the retailer to insert a 
special message of his own. 

A recent development (not new. but 
getting much more attention from spon- 
sors this year l is the practice whereby 
a sponsor approves in advance for co- 
operative advertising one or more tran- 
scribed shows on which he will share 
the costs. The agency is normallv in 
the best position to advise the client on 
the type of show to carry his banner, 
where a program gets the nod over 
other radio possibilities. 

Household appliances is the product 
class for which shows are most often 
approved. Hotpoint division of Gen- 
eral Electric, for example, has ap- 
proved among others 19 Ziv shows. 
Frigidaire I General Motors! has ap- 
proved the NBC Radio Recording list, 
a half-dozen Harry S. Goodman shows, 
and others. 

Refineries approve shows from 
drama to Western music. In the logical 
field of sports they usually stick to 
live sessions: but as this story went 
to press, Deep Rock Oil I for the Mid- 
west ) was about to ink a pact with 
Charles Michelson Transcriptions for 
a transcribed version of Stan Lomax 
in Hi Sports, featuring interviews with 
famous sports personalities and high- 
lights of exciting events. Richfield Oil 
was negotiating for the show in the 
East. 

Whether a sponsor should use co- 
operative advertising at all is a ques- 
tion on which the agency viewpoint is 
extremely important. The fact that 
administering such a program is 
invariably a headache and of minor 
I if any) profit to an agency wont 
influence the recommendation of an 
agencv which puts the clients interests 
first, and some of them do. It is per- 
haps equalK true that feu agencies feel 
like arguing with a client who has al- 
readv made up his mind to use co- 
operative advertising. 

The agency not only should see that 
the client's product is presented proper- 
ly, but it also can render more than a 
mechanical service in seeing that the 
retailer's bills are in line. It is, as 



40 



SPONSOR 



w 



hat Media facts 



are important to you? 



coverage 7 

Ho«ofOH^s^ ao 



pov/er i 

50,000 v/ott*^ cleve \aod 
potion »« 




Akron 



, a«<l in 



Caoto°- 



market? 



listeners? 

one -tWrd ot « 




rog rams? 

oU tst« nd,n9 




Whatever you want in a sales 
medium . . . WGAR delivers . . . 
Coverage, Power, Listeners, Pro- 
grams, Market . . . and results! 
Be critical. Buy carefully. Compare! 
Ask any Petry man for all the facts. 



Represented Nationally 

by EDWARD PETRY 

& COMPANY 



15 AUGUST 1949 




50,000 WATTS 

Cleveland 



41 



< ei tainly evei j expei iem ed agenc) 
man knows, foolhardy for a manufac- 
ture] t" believe he - getl ing the lowest 
retail i ate bj i iding the i ontrai t- ol 
his outlets. It i- next to impossible 
to inn "\ ei all tin- "deals" an oudet 
might make h iili the i onnh ance ol 
Iim .il media. The best that can be 
. -\|><-i ted i~ i" hold -in li Blick 1 1 i< k- 
to .i minimum. \\ here bills have to be 
questioned, dealer-manufacturei good- 
will i- likely to !"■ less Btrained il the 
agent j does the questioning. 

Vgem j people generally agree that 
best bets foi cooperative advertising 
.ut those products in a highly competi- 
tive market, cai i ied in a number <>f 



stores that also carry Btocks <>f com- 
parable goods. The manufacturer's 
problem i- to cnnjuraj'c the dealer to 
push his items. Electrical appliances, 
radio and television sets, popular- 
priced clothing, etc.. are example-. 

The agency for one of the largest 
manufacturers of better women's 
dresses feels thai cooperative adver- 
tising foi that client's line — or for any 
more "exclusive" brand name — de- 
tract- from its prestige with store sales 
people. Their efforts are devoted to 
backing the line with appropriate na- 
tional advertising and fostering the 
"class idea among store personnel in 
the belief that this psychology will give 



^r! 



(U'J 



LOOKING FOR A BARGAIN IN RADIO? 
WBNS HAS IT IN CENTRAL OHIO— 

Yes, for just 74^ per thousand tuned-in homes you can broad- 
cast your sales message to this rich Central Ohio area. It's 
low cost advertising with high results. That's because WBNS 
has the listening audience of Central Ohio ... an audience 
that goes out and buys your product when they "Hear it on 
WBNS." 

• 

TOP TEN COLUMBUS HOOPERATINGS 
AGAIN PROVE WBNS LEADERSHIP— 

Hooperatings — Winter-Spring 1948-49 — Monday thru Friday day- 
time, show the top ten to be WBNS programs. Another demon- 
stration of the station's intensive coverage of Central Ohio. 

• 

BILL ZiPF'S "FARMTIME"— 
TOP DAYTIME HOOPER 
FOR LOCAL PROGRAM- 
ING IN CENTRAL OHIO— 

Go into the rural areas of Central Ohio 
and ask them if they know Bill Zipf. You 
will run into thousands who day after day 
depend upon Bill for information on farming. 

Newspaper columnist, authority on agriculture, broadcaster, 
friend — that's Bill Zipf to the farmer and city dweller of this 
area. A novel twist to this farm packed program is Sally Flowers 
with her salty songs and snappy humor. 
Here's a sales harvest for advertisers. 



COVERS 
t STRAU 



OH\° 



IN COLUMBUS ITS 



rr 



POWER 5000 D*1000*N CBS 



ASK JOHN BLAIR 



the line a better break with local sales 
personnel. 

Obviousy, however, when a manu- 
facturer limits his franchise to a single 
store in a major city (Fashion Park; 
Hart. Schaffner & Marx, etc.), national 
advertising becomes relativelv more 
expensive. It may then become logical 
to participate financially in the adver- 
tising of retailers who will give his line 
special preference. 

Henry J. Kaufman & Associates 
i Washington. I). C.) sums up the 
agency viewpoint this way: ''First, 
establish brand identity and consumer 
acceptance before doing any coopera- 
te e advertising. Secondly, when em- 
barking on a cooperative campaign, 
establish fair rules of the game and 
adhere to them rigidly." * * * 



RESEARCH PORTFOLIO 

(Continued from page 2 ( ) I 

tern, the "lie detector," or various 
panels. Most research directors w ant 
almost a blank check to use for special 
studies on both programs and com- 
mercials. They contend that there's 
far too much blue sky in broadcast ad- 
vertising. They want to be able to 
pre-check the effectiveness of both pro- 
gram and advertising content of any- 
air. 

They feel that a broadcast research 
portfolio must budget half of what 
it spends for special studies. They 
further feel that there's far too much 
spent for unused data. "Let's use all 
the techniques that are available to 
control air advertising, and stop buying 
a lot of research data that is past his- 
tory. You cant develop effective ad- 
vertising of any kind with after-the- 
fact controls." 

This type of research man wants 
to work with Lazarsfeld. Schwerin, his 
own panels, and every new form of 
copy and media control available. He 
also wants as many reports of what his 
competition is doing as are available. 
Thus he feels that Rorabaughs Reports, 
both selective radio and TV, are vital. 
He wishes that Rorabaugh's radio re- 
port was as comprehensive as Rora- 
baugh's T\ report, but uses it for what 
it s worth — no more. The latter is im- 
portant, using all research just for 
what it's worth, no more or less. "Most 
of the research errors." states this type 
of investigator, "are made because facts 
are stretched far beyond their mean- 
ings. It makes no difference how good 



42 



SPONSOR 



the figures are, they're no good when 
they're used to report something dif- 
ferent than they cover." Using Pro- 
gram Hooperatings to project to cover- 
age or program circulation figures is 
what this researcher has in mind. 

The TV Rorahaugh Report covers 
all the business placed on stations and 
networks in the TV field. The Rora- 
haugh Report covering selective (spot) 
broadcasting covers all the business 
placed through a number of reporting 
advertising agencies. It's not complete 
and doesn't pretend to be. 

No radio or media research man 
wants to function without knowing just 
what his competition is doing. It isn't 
that he objects to doing the same 
thing, but he wants to do it with varia- 
tions. On the networks it's possible 
to keep a weather eye open on every 
advertiser. It isn't easy to do this on 
market-by-market broadcast advertis- 
ing. That's why Rorabaugh is neces- 
sary. 

Market research is part of the port- 
folio of a radio research man. Unless 
he has facts and figures on what his 
firm is trying to do marketwise, all the 
radio research in the world is useless. 
That's why a number of firms turn to 
Nielsen. He not only delivers radio 
ratings, but also is able to check the 
buying habits of the homes that listen 
and those that don't listen. Through 
the Nielsen controlled-area sample, a 
client research executive can evaluate 
the impact of his program. 

In TV, a researcher wants to know 
many more things than he wants to 
know about radio. (He thinks he knows 
radio living habits.) Thus, he wants 
all the studies like Videotown, CBS's 
sample TV town, and the many college 
and independent studies being made 
by factors that want to become part of 
the future of television research. He 
wants and needs everything. In TV, 
Hooper's figures on programs are far 
ahead of all other video research. With- 
out Hooper's City and National TV 
Hooperatings, an advertiser's research 
portfolio just isn't complete. 

A radio research portfolio must first 
start with a man who knows radio re- 
search. 

After that, the sky is the limit. 

In some cases, just having a good 
research man is enough — no matter 
what anyone thinks. A good research 
man always can obtain through his 
agency the facts he wants and use 
them. His life is easier, of course, if he 
doesn't have to scrounge. * * * 



IN THE UTICA-ROME AREA 

WSX\% 

FIRST by FAR 



in 



OQ^Xdww^ 



* WIBX — FIRST IN 31 OUT OF 40 DAYTIME SEGMENTS 
HOOPERATED! And second in 7, third in only 2! That's WIBXs 
record in the C. E. Hooper January through April Report, 1949! 

* WIBX HAD 16 DAYTIME QUARTER -HOUR PERIODS 
RATED 13 OR BETTER! No other Utica or Rome station had 
a single period with such a rating! 

ANY WAY YOU LOOK AT IT, WIBX is out in front ... in total audience 
and total sales ... in its 5000-watt DAY and NIGHT coverage... in its merchan- 
dising. Put your product out front too in the Utica-Rome area — through WIBX! 







C . E. HOOPER 


JANUARY THROUGH APRIL REPORT, 1949 


AVERAGE 


RATINGS-Jan 1949 through Apr. 


1949 






Weekdays: 


Mondays through Fr 


days 








WIBX 


Sta. B 


Sta. C 


Sta. D 


Sta. E 


Sta. F 


Sta. G 


Sta. H 


MORNINGS 


10.58 


4.83 


2.2 


3.27 


.91 


1.0 


.32 


.27 


AFTERNOONS 


12.00 


3.75 


3.97 


2.90 


1.54 


1.42 


.36 


.49 


ALL DAY 


11.43 


4.19 


3.29 


3.06 


1.29 


1.25 


.35 


.40 


EVENINGS 
(Sun. thru Sat.) 


19.20 


4.17 


2.96 


3.31 


4.12 


2.45 


.44 


.11 


SHARE 


OF AUDIENCE 


— Weekdays.- 


Monda' 


^s throu 


gh Frid 


ays 




WIBX Sta. B 


Sta. C 


Sta. D 


Sta. E 


Sta. F 


Sta. G 


Sta. H 


MORNINGS 


44.6 


20.1 


9.4 


14.2 


3.8 


4.2 


1.4 


1.2 


AFTERNOONS 


45.1 


14.1 


14.9 


10.9 


5.9 


5.3 


1.4 


1.9 


EVENINGS 

(Sun. thru Sat.) 


51.8 


11.3 


8.0 


8.9 


11.3 


6.6 


1.2 


0.3 




Representatives — New York : Helen Wood & Colton. Chicago, 
Atlanta, Oklahoma City, Dallas : Ra -Tel Representatives Inc. 
Boston: Bertha Bannan. Los Angeles: Walter Biddick. 



Dial 950 
5000 Watts 

DAY and NIGHT 



CBS since 1934 



WIBX 

UTICA 2, NEW YORK 



Also WIBX-FM 



96.9 Megacycles 



5 AUGUST 1949 



43 



There's WMT Strength 

in Union oowa) 




. . . signal strength on Iowa's best 
frequency, 600 kc. . . . program 
strength with exclusive CBS net- 
work shows in Eastern Iowa . . . 
„i W8 strength with a News Center 
that utilizes AP, UP, INS, and lo- 
cal correspondents throughout the 
state. 

I nion is one of the hundreds of 
communities in WMTland whose 
aggregate 1,121,782 people* farm 
the nation's most fertile lands and 
work in the area's humming indus- 
tries. Join the union of WMT ad- 
vertisers if you want coverage in 
this important market. The Katz 
man has full details. 

* within WMT' 8 2.5 mv line. 



I 



fcX^SC- 









WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Watts 600 K.C. Day & Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




MfTIO 



THE PROSPEROUS 

SOW**** NEW EMtVNWb 

MARKET 




Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres— Gen. Mgr. . Waller Johnson, Asst. Gen. Mgr. — Sales Mgr. 
WTIC's 50,000 WATTS REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY WEED & CO. 



NETWORK PROMOTION 
(Continued from page 21) 

for that night in their Life ads and 
run the ads the same issue in which 
ABC has its Fridav night promotion. 
Thus a number of pages will show a 
signpost swinging and telling the 
world," "Aren't you glad it's Friday." 

CBS dramatizes its star-schedule 
with an issue of Radio Mirror devoted 
lull', to Columbia. From cover to 
cover, the October edition of Radio 
Mirror will be an all-CBS issue. The 
editorial will be a Salute to CBS. all 
the feature stories will be about CBS 
stars. Even the regular standing fea- 
tures of the book — from Favorite 
Foods to Facing the Music will be ex- 
clusively devoted to the Paley network. 
Radio Mirror has 600.000 circulation 
and CBS is not going to let the all- 
Columbia issue go unnoticed. 

In the past it has been CBS that has 
traveled a publicity man around the 
country to work with CBS affiliates in 
achieving a better press liaison. While 
a man may travel for CBS this season, 
it's NBC that has gone all-out to serv- 
ice the press on its home grounds. The 
senior network will travel eight pub- 
licity men for a 20-day period starting 
with the date of this SPONSOR issue 
(15 August). Five will travel out of 
New York, two out of Hollywood, and 
one out of Chicago. 

Interest among stations in fall pro- 
motion is not quiescent as it has been 
in past vears. The advertising and 
promotion departments of the major 
networks are being pushed by sta- 
tions into even greater activity than 
previously announced. At CBS, for in- 
stance, it was not planned to include 
car cards and posters in the material 
serviced by the web. The demand for 
this display paper has been so great 
that the audience promotion depart- 
ment is already planning car cards and 
may include 24-sheet posters in the 
promotional kits sent affiliates. 

As indicated on the bar chart pub- 
lished with this report, stations haven't 
used network outdoor advertising to 
any great degree. The networks have 
furnished paper in the past but have 
found that its use seldom justified 
the cost to the chain. The same thing 
is true of the use of car cards, taxi 
cards, and other forms of display ma- 
terial. A few stations have used dis- 
play effectively, but they have been in 
the minority. It may be different with 
CBS this fall. 



44 



SPONSOR 



Agency men have always been in- 
terested in the use of motion pictures 
to sell radio. The greatest agency re- 
sponse ever accorded a promotional 
presentation was that given NBC the 
year in which a trailer on fall pro- 
graming was shown in local motion 
picture theaters. 

NBC's promotional motion picture, 
Behind Your Radio Dial, has been 
shown throughout the U. S. under the 
sponsorship of affiliate stations. This 
fall its showings move out of the sta- 
tion sponsorship class and the picture 
will be roadshown by agencies of 
Modern Talking Picture Services. It 
is NBC's plan to saturate the non-pro- 
fessional motion picture field so that 
as many listeners as possible will be 
impressed by the story of radio and 
NBC. The picture has proved itself 
during the period it has been screened 
by the stations that have been alert 
enough to realize the long and short 
term values of a documentary like this. 

It's always important to advertisers 
to obtain some idea of what a promo- 
tion costs. It is almost impossible to 



GOT A 
BROAD 
OUTLOOK ON 

NARB<££§ 



(Ky.V? 



i- hard you work, 
your merchandising j ^ 
^es in Narrows CKy> State ^ 

be mighty gjg;*, have what 
little towns just ao* gales 

it takes to maKe a 
potential . • • _ however, 

On ^e other ^and, h 
sales opporwuuw* » fe wide 

vi Ue Trading Area a ^ 

an d handsome, ims t ^ 

tr «ly metroP fZls Uving here 
Kentucky, and * £ 

have a 45 % ^ he peo ple 

Buying ^^^ie State. 

ln lhC "I out of Narrows, Pal, 

SdTrepa- «- ^F^' ^ 
WAVE'S waiting- 
thick of things'. 




obtain a definite figure of what the 
four networks will pour into this fall 
promotion. CBS' unofficial estimate is 
$300,000. NBC will spend as much as 
it has to, its budget being set and unset 
regularly. 

ABC has a tough job ahead. It's go- 
ing to spend money and its final bud- 
get may top that of the senior webs. 
Station cooperation with ABC isn't all 
that that network could wish at this 
lime. It will, however, improve this 
fall, that's certain. 

MBS has once again become promo- 
tion-minded. No longer do its top 



policy men worry about its promotion 
being better than the network. 

With the four networks sparking a 
slam-bang promotional operation this 
fall, the stations of the nation, net- 
work affiliates and others, will step 
right along. One network checked 
calls from 23 stations in one day — 
calls that asked for promotional ma- 
terial. 

It all adds up to bigger audiences, 
listening more hours to more stations 
than ever before — despite the rapid 
growth of television. 

Radio isn't asleep at the switch. 



"Let's have pheasant „ 
per breakfast, elm irey/ 




Us hayseeds in the Red River Valley really love our na- 
tive pheasant, hut we've also got the dough for lots of 
"houghten" luxuries that most city folks ean't afford! 

When it eonies to choosing a hrand, or deciding what 
to huy, persuasive, 26-year-old WDAY gets to most of us, 
the most often! This fabulous station now gets more than 
a 66.0% Share of Audience Weekday Mornings, After- 
noons and Evenings against a 16.8% "tops" for Station 
B, C or D (Fargo-Moorhead Hoopers, Dec. '48 — Apr. 
'49). And WDAY's coverage of the whole Red River Valley 
is just as impressive. 

Whatever you sell, WDAY will help you sell more! 
Write to us, or ask Free & Peters for all the facts. 



wp/iy 



r- 



% 




FARGO, N. D. 
NBC • 970 KILOCYCLES • 5000 WATTS 
"FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



15 AUGUST 1949 



45 



What It Takes To Make Radio 
Do A Selling Job... 





*k Showmanship . . . 

* Know-How . . . 

* Good Programming .. . 

if And. ..the enthusiasm to 
follow through in detail ! 

* For All The Facts About 
WIOD's Leadership in 
Miami. ..Call Our Rep... 

George P. Hollingbery Co. 



James M. LeGatC, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC 



Oomefimes you've just gof to get your 
spots recorded and pressed in a hurry. 
Yet you must have qualify too. That's 
where RCA skill and RCA equipment 
make all the difference. 

As they do in every recording and press- 
ing requirement! At RCA Victor you get 
the benefit of: 

• The most modern equipment and facilities 
in the trade, plus 50 years' accumulated 
"know-how." 

• High-fidelity phonograph records of all 
kinds. All types of Vinylite transcriptions. 

• Complete facilities for turning out slide 
film and home phonograph type records. 

• Fast handling and delivery. 



^tofar$/$$_ 



When you can gef RCA "know- 
how" — why take anything lea? 

Send your masters to your 

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Sales Studio: 

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You'll find useful facts 

in our Custom Record Brochure. 

Send for it today! 





Ever need "sudden 

service" on SPOTS? 



WHAT YOU PAY FOR 
(Continued from page 25) 

There are various forms of rate cut- 
ting. It's possible to pa\ the rate-card 
figures and still chisel. As usual in the 
long run, the chisler gets just what he 
pays for. 

One advertiser paid the full card 
rate and had the announcers fee elimi- 
nated, i Not ever) station charges tal- 
ent fees for live announcements hut 
many do because of AFRA, American 
Federation of Radio Actors contracts. I 
Another advertisers contract specified 
"B" time periods with the understand- 
ing that he d get "A" station breaks, 
as many as were open on the dates for 
which he contracted. He received 
quite a number of "A" time station 
breaks — they were open because the 
Hooperatings for the periods were in 
most cases less than many during the 
"B" time hours. Technically he was 
"tearing up the rate card." Actually 
he wasn't getting as much as he paid 
for. 

A third advertiser developed a 
'"cute" trick. His announcements al- 
ways ran longer than the time period 
for which he contracted. The stations 
either had the announcer rush the life 
out of the announcements — or else 
scheduled them at hours when it didn't 
really matter how long they w ere I be- 
tween sustaining programs). Even the 
stations that permitted the sponsor to 
get away with the over-long announce- 
ments didn't give the advertiser too 
much of a break — long announcements 
chase listeners if they haven't any pro- 
gram help. 

One type of sponsor usually gets 
just what he asks for — short term 
schedules at high frequency rates. 
These advertisers insist that their agen- 
cies place the business at maximum 
discounts and also insist that special 
contracts be drawn so that "if we are 
forced to cancel before we have earned 
the maximum discounts we shall be 
permitted to do so without any pen- 
altv. " Few stations like to refuse busi- 
ness placed on this basis because many 
advertisers do run the maximum fre- 
quencv discount periods. It may be 
fair that if business conditions compel 
the advertiser not to complete his 
schedule, he should not be penalized. 

Most stations, just as most other 
media, do a certain amount of mer- 
chandising. Thev mav do as much as 
WLW (Cincinnati), WCAE i Pitts- 
burgh i. WNAX (Yankton, S. D.) or 
as little as some tins davtime-onlv 250- 



46 



SPONSOR 



watt outlets. The chiselers just don't 
get the extras. Most of the time, they 
don't ask for the extras, but when they 
do, it's usually explained that "the 
extras are available only at a fee." If 
they pay the extra fee, they'll find that 
it's usually more than they would have 
paid if they hadn't tried to cut corners 
to start with. 

Where stations have both "national" 
and "local-retail" rates, many adver- 
tisers feel it's their right to try to ob- 
tain the time periods they want at local 
rates. Newspapers have for years 
fought this attempt of national adver- 
tisers to buy time at "retail" rates. 
There aren't as many stations with 
dual rate structures as there are news- 
papers with the dual set-ups. Both sta- 
tions and newspapers explain dual 
rates by the fact that local retail ad- 
vertising has a news quality that na- 
tional advertising can't have ... or 
if it can have, it seldom does. News- 
papers generally have multiple rates — 
one for run-of-the-paper, another for 
"entertainment" advertising, others for 
classified, department store, etc. Na- 
tional advertising doesn't pay as high 
as "entertainment", or classified but 
it does pay more than retail, etc. 

With stations, national advertising 
has to pass through station represen- 
tatives or receive other forms of special 
servicing. It costs more to handle na- 
tional than it does local advertising. 
Thus, reason stations, it should be 
charged more. 

When advertisers insist on local 
rates, they get local servicing. Local 
advertisers do not expect merchandis- 
ing. National advertisers at local rates 
don't get merchandising. Neither do 
they get any special promotion. They 
get just what they pay for. 

A not-too-easy-to-combat form of 
tearing up the rate card is the insist- 
ence on "free air promotion" for a 
broadcast advertising campaign. The 
radio industry has become very aware 
of the power of its own medium. More 
and more stations are using their own 
air to push what they have on the air. 
Thus it's difficult to say "no" to an ad- 
vertiser who insists on a pre-schedule- 
start promotional campaign on the air 
at no cost. Networks do it for their 
advertisers when sponsors buy a pro- 
gram that hasn't developed an air fol- 
lowing, by broadcasting the program 
at chain expense from four to eight 
weeks before the first commercial air- 
ing. This is usually done when the 
network owns the program. Since the 
chain will profit both from selling the 



program and the time, it can afford 
to fill in the before-sponsored period 
with the program itself. It has to fill 
in the time somehow, anyway- 

This isn't true with an individual 
station. When it employs pre-commer- 
cial time to build up an about-to- 
come-to-the-air broadcast advertising 
schedule, it's giving away cash. Sta- 
tions can generally sell good open 
time, since local schedules are usually 
on a two-week cancellation basis. 

Rate cards are generally set on a 
basis that will return a fair profit to 
the station operator. The rates are 



established to permit the station to 
render an effective public service and 
to permit a station to assist an adver- 
tiser in gaining sales and acceptance. 
When card rates are cut, services are 
cut. Stations do not operate at a loss 
if they can help it. If stations do all 
that they'd like to do, and still tear up 
their card — they will go bankrupt. 

A station representative who has 
been in the business for over 20 years 
put the case to a national advertiser 
very succinctly. "Ask for all the serv- 
ices for which you are entitled and 
pay the rate on the tag." * + * 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S IJiXUi&e/l RADIO STATION 



OF THE 




Because Local advertisers know that WDBJ excels 
in coverage, distribution and RESULTS in Roanoke and 
Southwestern Virginia*, 34 LOCAL accounts have 
maintained continuous advertising schedules from 5 
to 15 years on WDBJ. 
*Ask your Free & Peters Colonel for survey material. 

WDBJ's potential audience is over 
a million people who can spend 
almost a billion dollars yearly. 



CBS • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 

Owned and Operated by the 
TIMES-WOULD CORPORATION 

ROANOKE, VA. 

FREE & PETERS. INC., National Representatives 



5 AUGUST 1949 



47 



"DRINK THIS IN" the squirt slant 

( < 'Hi in tift/ from I'age 23) 

— Mountain Mike 

soft-drink shop," said one. "is located 
it .1 school bus stop. I've run out of 

^quiit ~n man) times I m going 1)111"! 
< n-t» were low, compared with re- 

- .It-. \ breakdown of a typical broad- 

casl in San Bernardino showed these 
osts on the balance sheet: 




MORE LOCAL PROGRAMS 

sold;than any 

ASHEVILLE STATION! 

— — folks just naturally pre- 
fer our brand of "Corn"! 




5,000 Watts Day— 1,000 Night— 1380 Kc 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Air tim. 

Talent 

Prizes 

l . tie chai 

Auditorium 

Show royalty* 



•30', of the time charge. 



25.00 

12.50 

5.00 

1 Vim 
10.80 

$12-1.30 



With the results of the San Bernar- 
dino campaign in the home office, 
Squirt decided to expand the operation. 
>till on a semi-trial basis, to ten other 
radio markets. Most of the ten were 
about the same size as San Bernardino. 
To Squirt. Bids From The Kids looked 
\ci\ much like a low -cost answer to a 
soft-drink man's prayer for a method 
of increasing distribution and sales. 
Bids From The Kids went on the air 
in Sioux Falls, S. D.; Canton, Ohio: 
Haverhill. Mass.: Cherokee, Iowa; 
Chicago, 111.; Detroit, Mich.: Red 
Wing. Minn.; and Eau Claire, Wise. 




BOOMERANG! 



I'm sorry I ever heard of KXOK. My life is miserable. You see, I bragged to 
the boss about our program's low-cost-per-Hooper point on KXOK, like you 
suggested, and he just grinned like a Cheshire and said: "That proves what 
you can do when you really try. Now go into all our markets and get as good 
a buy as you did on KXOK." You and I know that's tough to do . . . but 
how can I convince the Boss? 

On-The-Spot 

Dear On-The-Spot: 

Your Boss situation is going to be much worse. Wait till he finds out KXOK's 
high Hooper position during March, 1949. When KXOK's rates are balanced 
with its share of audience, the combination is terrific. You and I know the base 
hourly rate on Station "A" is 57% higher than KXOK's, and Station "B" has 
a base rate 32% higher . . . yet they delivered only 15% and 2.4% more audi- 
ence during March. Better not mention KXOK's powerful signal at 630 on 
the dial, reaches 115 counties in six states, daytime, in mid- America. 

KXOK, St. Louis 

630 on the dial 

A "John Blair" station 



Basic ABC 



5,000 Watts 



\ few big cities were on the list, but 
the main effort was in small towns. 

One such town, typical of many of 
the other Squirt test cities, was Canton. 
Ohio. There, on Canton's 5,000-watt 
ABC outlet, WHBC and WHBC-FM. 
Bids From The Kids made its debut on 
16 April last in a 9:30-10 Saturday 
morning slot. The show originated 
remote from the Onesto Hotel's main 
ballroom, and was a hit almost from 
the beginning. 

WHBC is an aggressive organiza- 
tion that is willing to turn on the pro- 
motional steam when it is needed to 
do a local or national sponsor the most 
good. Julius Glass. WHBC's merchan- 
dising-conscious promotion man, went 
to bat for Bids From The Kids from 
the beginning. Glass sent out mailings, 
organized promotional stunts, snagged 
and cajoled guest stars to appear on 
the show, built window displays, made 
tic-ins with the local merchants for 
extra prizes, and generally whooped it 
up for Squirt and Bids From The Kids. 
Attendance climbed steadily for the 
broadcasts, nearl) tripling in the 13 
weeks it ran on WHBC. The local 
Squirt distributor. Bob Olin I he later 
sold out at a good price — after the 
show had hypoed his sales figures I , be- 
gan to add new r Squirt outlets at the 
average rate of three or four a week, 
while his case sales climbed. As for 
the number of Squirt caps that the 
kids themselves were bidding, the earlv 
"high" in the broadcasts was usually 
a couple of hundred. On the final 
broadcast on 9 July, one kid bid 1600 
bottle caps for a watch. Squirt sales, 
for the local bottler, began to run 
around one case of Squirt per person 
per year in the territory. (Since the 
national consumption, all beverages 
included, per capita is about six cases, 
this meant that Squirt was bagging 
about one-sixth of the business in the 
Canton area for all soft drinks.) 

WHBC continued, during the run of 
the broadcasts, to give Bids From The 
Kids better-than-average promotion, 
using courtesy spots, window displays, 
streamers, and throw-aways, and doing 
a real job of billboarding the town. 

Toward the end of May. in the com- 
pany house organ. The Squirt Reporter. 
the soft-drink firms home office led 
off a storj on Bids From The Kids 
with this happy platitude: "'If you can 
sell the kids, you can sell anybody— 
you cant fool the kids!"' Further on. 
in the same story in the Squirt house 
organ, the firm added: "That the 
show is a success is proxen in the 



48 



SPONSOR 



test markets where sales have almost 
tripled during the winter months over 
summer months of the year previous. 
The use of Squirt hottle caps in place 
of money at the auction results in im- 
mediate sales, increased distrihution 
and tremendous word-of-mouth adver- 
tising. Squirt bottle caps become in 
effect money with which the children 
barter all week long as well as on the 
radio show itself." 

At this point, the logical ending for 
a Hollywood success story like Bids 
From The Kids and Squirt would 
with the show into a golden future. It 
with radio into a golden future. It 
came as something of a surprise, to 
say the least, when Squirt announced 
at the end of the 13-week period last 
month (July) that they had relin- 
quished their rights to the Bids From 
The Kids package and were not plan- 
ning to continue it. The answer is one 
that is basic for all advertisers who 
have planned, or are planning, to use 
juvenile promotions. 

Said one Squirt official, when asked 
why the show was being dropped: 
"Bids From The Kids did a good job 
of publicizing Squirt. It also forced a 
lot of distribution where there hadn't 
been any before. But, the sales just 
didn't hold up, or they didn't material- 
ize in certain areas. One fault was 
the lack of consistent station promotion 
for the show. Some of it was good, 
most of it was not. The major trouble 
we ran into was the matter of where 
the bottle tops were coming from. For 
awhile, it looked as though all those 
tops represented new sales. Actually, 
we found out that kids were spending 
hours rummaging through coolers and 
city dumps to find the caps — they 
weren't really buying at all. In some 
other markets, the kids would get bar- 
tenders to collect caps for them. One 
kid's father owned a bar, and he con- 
sistently had more caps than anybody 
else. In a small town, that kind of 
word spreads fast among kids, and 
while the whole thing started out well, 
it just didn't last." 

One New York agencyman, a veteran 
of years of handling and creating spe- 
cial radio promotions for soft drinks, 
had this to say of promotions aimed at 
the juvenile soft-drink market: "Un- 
less such promotions are carefully tied 
by the parent company into specific 
market objectives — like staging teen- 
age fashion shows to introduce the 
establishment of soft-drink coolers in 
a department store — and then dropped 
quickly in favor of letting regular 



media advertising carry the load, such 
promotions just don't work after 
a while, Promotions in the soft drink 
industry, particularly juvenile promo- 
tions, can sometimes be very effective. 
They are never a cheap substitute for 
regular media advertising." 

The "caps as coin" idea is still good 
and Bids From the Kids could do an 
effective job with, say a bread firm or 
a candy concern, using wrappers in- 
stead of bottle tops in the broadcasts. 
The show is simple and promotable. 
Some method of coding the various 
"proof-of-purchase" used in the show 
(i.e., using red bottle caps for grocery 
store usage and green ones for bars 
and restaurants) would get around the 
drawback of having enterprising kids 
tap a source of supply that would give 
them an unfair advantage. Complete 
merchandising plans, involving both 
manufacturer, dealer, and radio or TV 
station, would have to be evolved and 
carried out, instead of letting the sta- 
tion carry the load. 

Juvenile promotions like Bids From 
The Kids seldom function well in- 
definitely on their own. Their use as 
short-term promotions, coupled with 
regular media advertising, can build 
real sales. -* * + 



A GREAT STATION 
FOR SMART 
ADVERTISERS 



w 

T 



R 



AM-FM 



F 



Covering the 

Prosperous 

Greater Wheeling 

Market From 
BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Represented by 

THE WALKER COMPANY 




A 



FIRST IN THE 



/? 



QUAD 



\Z^Cce4- 



DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND, MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



AM 



5,000 W 
1420 Kc. 



FM 



47 Kw. 
103.7 Mc. 



TV 



C.P. 22.9 Kw. visual 
and aural, Channel 5 



Basic Affiliate of NBC, 
the No. 1 Network 



WOC is the FIRST individual station . . 
the only Quad-Cities station . . to 
offer its clients commercial copy analysis. 
On request WOC's Research Department 
tests WOC advertisers' copy for sales 
effectiveness through listening ease and 
human interest . . according to a proved 
formula developed by renowned analyst 
Dr. Rudolph Flesch. All WOC-written 
copy is so evaluated. Another in WOC's 
long list of "FIRST'S" ! 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
Ernest Sanders, Manager 

DAVEN PORT, IOWA 




FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



15 AUGUST 1949 



49 



The human voice is our 
first and best instructor. 
"Up-se-daisy!" "Come here!" 
"Put it down!" Radio uses the 
selling power of the human 
voice to its fullest effect. 




YOU DO WHAT YOU'RE TOLD ! 



In all radio CBS is the most 
effective network because more 
people listen more of the 
time to what CBS tells them. 
Why? Because night and day, 
in all its programs CBS 
tells them more of the things 
they enjoy hearing most. 




CBS 

. . .for the largest 
audiences in the world 









SUNDAY MONDAY 

■ ■■'■— 11 !M,:«ui:Mil:!| 


DHV 


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 


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topped since! 

ported «»« prefet- 
^ HE ^HEC°s HooP«- 



Babe Ruth 
In Home Runs 

WHEC 
In Rochester 



/00G W*' 



* 



; 



/ 



^3M5ttfe 



UAPBRSHIP! 



WHEC is Rochester's most-listened-to station and has 
been ever since Rochester has been Hooperated! 
Note WHEC's leadership morning, afternoon, evening: 



STATION 

WHEC 
40.4 



STATION 



STATION 



STATION 



STATION 



MORNING 

8:00-12:00 Noon 
Monday through Fri. 

AFTERNOON 32.9 27.3 8.5 14.0 14.0 2.8 

1 2:00-6:00 P.M. 
Monday through Fri. 

EVENING 

6:00-10:30 P.M. 
Sunday through Sat. 



36.8 30.3 7.2 9.8 14.5 
WINTER-SPRING HOOPER REPORT 

December '48 — April '49 



Station 

Broadcasts 

till Sunset 

Only 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: - 






of'B^e^i 



N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New York, Chicago, HOMER GRIFFITH CO., Los Angeles, San Francisco 



15 AUGUST 1949 55 



BEE II 



W ANIIIX. MAUIIMS 



SPONSOR: National Brewing « ,,. VGENi 'i : Owen & < happell 

I VPSULE ( VS1 HISTORY: This brewing firm, which 
markets it- National Premium and National Bohemian 
Beei primaril) in Baltimore and Washington, 1). C, has 
•iiaclualK increased T\ sponsorship in those two cities 
in 24 months until it i- now Bponsring I! 1 - hours of live 
l\ programing per week, plus film breaks and announce- 
ments. WeekK T\ budget is over $4,000. Definite sales 
inc leases have been produced. National's T\ films, made 
bj \e\\ York's Cinemart, Inc., recentl) ranked first in 
Baltimore, second in Washington in a popularity survey. 
WMAR-TV, Hah...: WTTG, Wash. PROGRAMS: Various 




results 



YARIOI JS 



SPONSOR: Combs Bros. VGENCY: Placed direct 

< VPSl II < w: HISTORY: Combs Bros.. Dayton appli- 
ance store, found annoucements on television highly pro- 
ductive. Combs' announcements were for Whirpool dish- 
washers. \lthough initially the appliance house consid- 
ered the use of TV as an experiment that might not be too 
successful, due to the fact that each washing-machine 
unit sells for $299.95, it realized the impact of TV adver- 
tising after the first 30 days, during which time 28 units 
had been sold as a direct result of the announcements. 



\\ I \\ I). Dayton, Ohio 



PROGR \M: Announcements 



ADVERTISING AGENCY 



SPONSOR: Kighl Advertising, Inc. VGENCY: Placed direct 

< VPS1 I I. ( W: HISTORY: This advertising agency de- 
cided to use an announcement campaign on WLW-C. and 
the best proof of its results is the fact that it has recentl] 
signed a new long-term contract with the station for con- 
tinuation of its campaign. Shortly after going on the TV 
air. Right had four direct inquiries b\ telephone from 
advertisers who knew of the agencv only through the 
video announcements. Two of the four have become 
clients of the agency, and the other two are favorable 
prospects. 



WLW-C, Columbus, Ohio 



PROCR A M : Announcements 



TOYS 



SPONSOR: Participating \(.l \< IKS: Various 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Market Melodies, two-hour 
economics program on Tuesdays through Saturdavs. is 
sponsored by six food manufacturers and Brooklyn 
Union Gas Company for gas appliances. In addition to 
home economics, interesting personalities are interviewed 
on occasion. The show is conducted by Anne Russell and 
Walter Herlihy. Since it went on the air on 27 May, 
30,500 letters have been received, with the weekly peak 
reached 2-6 August when a total of 8.511 letters and 
postcards were pulled. 

WJZ-TV, New York PROGRAM: "Market Melodies" 



SPONSOR: John Shillito Co. VGENCY: Placed direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: John Shillito Company, Cin- 
cinnati s largest department store, has alreadv requested 
participation on Junior Jamboree for the 1949 Christmas 
season, as a result of its success on this program during 
last year's holiday period. At that time the company 
participated on Jamboree, the commercial featuring a tov 
ranging in price from 98 cents to $39.95. A total of 18 
shows was sponsored, with 18 different toys featured. 
Each of the was a sell-out before noon the following day 
in Shillito's toy department. 

W I.W-T, Cincinnati PROGRAM: "Junior Jamboree" 



PEANUT BITTER 



BAKERY 



SPONSOR: Swift & Co.; other* \< EN< ^ : .1. Waller Thompson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: TV Telephone Came bingo- 
type quiz game in which listeners call the program if 
tliev think they have answered the question correctly, is 
sponsored by Swift, for peanut butter. Cannon Mill>. 
hosierv. and General Foods for Grape Nuts Flakes, both 
through Young & Rubicam. Over 15,000 calls were re- 
ceived in two months, prizes being sponsors' products in 
redeemable certificate form. Show proved so successful 
for Swift that the firm had to appoint two more food 
brokers to handle the increased business. 



WJZ-TV, New York 



PROGRAM: "T\ Telephone Game" 



SPONSORS: Participating VGENCIES: Various 

( VPSI LE CASE HISTORY: Among the five sponsors par- 
ticipating on Uncle Jake's House is Richard W. Kaase 
Company, Cleveland bakerv. which placed this TV busi- 
ness direct. To tie in with the program feature of honor- 
ing birthdav children. Kaase sells an I ncle Jake birthday 
cake, which must be speeialh ordered and which is 
topped with figures of I ncle Jake's animals and the name 
of the birthdav child. In one month during which the 
cake was mentioned on the show. 80 of them I at $2.50 
each I were sold in Cleveland and out-of-town. 

WEWS, I leveland PROGRAM: "Uncle Jake - * House" 





j|.;j keile»7a«iogp 






NEW ORLEANS' MARDI GRAS IS THAT TOWN'S GREATEST AND MOST COLORFUL EVENT. WDSU-TV COVERS IT LIKE A BLANKET 



IV. home town force ... 



s a struggle to make 



television part of the community life, but ii's being done 




* 



It's important for a sta- 
tion to have a network 
affiliation in television, 
just as it is in radio. If. however, a 
station leans too heavily on its network 
affiliation it becomes a eunuch. For a 
station to have real impact in its terri- 
tory it must be representative of its 
section of the country. It must like- 
wise serve the individual and peculiar 
needs of the population it seeks to 
move to buy. 

It is one thing to serve localized 
needs through radio and still another 
to serve them through TV. The rela- 
tive costs of doing a remote in radio 

■^ WDSU-TV enlrance bespeaks New Orleans 



15 AUGUST 1949 



and video indicate that it costs from 
six to eight times as much to present 
the visual program on the air as to 
transmit sound only. The result has 
been that TV stations have thus far 
turned to networks and film, with only 
a tiny percentage of programing being 
live. 

A live studio TV program costs 
many times the equivalent program in 
sound alone. Even when stations have 
avoided using scenery and have re- 
sorted to drapes and set pieces, the 
costs have been generally so high that 
stations have been scared away from 
doing a high-impact local job. Sta- 
tions beyond the coaxial cable have 
been using teletranscriptions. ( kine- 



57 



TV i.s ideal lor loral sport* 



scope recordings, as some call them) 
to buttress motion-picture film and 
sports on their programs. One of 
NBC s most promotion-minded affiliates 
asked an independent producer who 
wanted $100 to produce a live pro- 
gram for the station. "Whj should 1 
spend SK'O for a li\e program when 1 
can use a network sustainer virtually 
free?" 

The television station that feels its 
future lies in its abilitx to reflect and 
serve its own tight fifty miles is the 
exception today, not the rule. A good 
way to judge the future of a television 
station is to look at its schedule. If 
it's full of network and or kinescope 
recordings, with a little interlarding 
of sport remotes, it max he delivering 
audiences today, hut it won't dominate 
its market in the years to come. The 
history of WBT, Charlotte, points the 
way to what will happen in television. 
When first owned by CBS. it was used 
virtually as a relay station for CBS 
network programs. Month after month 
it seemed to grow weaker and weaker, 
and Bill Schudt, now Columbia direc- 
tor of station relations, was sent down 
to give the station a "local slant. 
Almost from the first, the station under 
Schudt's direction began to have local 
vitality. Its ratings went up and up. 
and by the time Schudt was shifted t<> 
other fields it covered the Charlotte 
area it served like a blanket. 

The network programs hadn't 
changed materially from the time 
Schudt took over WBT until he left, 
but the station's consciousness of a 
great section of North Carolina had. 
WBT today is one of the great sta- 
tions of the South. The continually - 
improving listening to WNBC in New 
York is also the result of the station 
ceasing to be just the flagship of NBC 
and becoming part and parcel of the 
life of New York. WNBC is at its 
all-time business high: its network. 
NBC, is not. 

Pace-setter among stations in sen - 
ing the cities in which they're located 
is WDSU, New r Orleans, under the 
direction of Bob Swezey, ex-MBS and 
ABC. Swezey and the stations presi- 
dent, Edgar Stern. Jr.. could have fol- 
lowed the recording and motion-pic- 
ture-film formula, but thex didn't. 

The Stern family is part of New 
Orleans, and thex wanted their station 
to be part of it also. It xvas easx not 
to be, >ince WDSU-TV had call upon 
NBC, CBS, DuMont. and ABC features, 
all on kinescope recordings. These are 
at least twice the programs upon which 




WDSU-TV telecasts matches and interviews contestants before fights for Maison Blanche and Seven-Up 



Human interest has area! TV-appeal 




There are lots of birthdays but Borden's Elsie's was something special for New Orleans and WDSU-TVj 




w Orleans is track-conscious, so WDSU-TV visits fair grounds for races, sponsored by Motorola 




dsters' hobbies make good viewing and heart tugging. WDSU-TV telecasts "The Golden Age Club 




an average station has call. WDSU-TV 
carried programs this Spring like 
Howdy Doody, Lucky Pup, Kukla, 
Fran & Ollie — three of the top juvenile 
programs in television. It had Milton 
Berle, Fred Waring. Gulf Road Show, 
Admiral Broadway Revue, Lucky 
Strike Show Time, and the cream of 
the four network sustainers. 

It also carried a real sock live sched- 
ule, a schedule which will have even 
more impact this fall. WDSU-TV has 
decided that good television is local as 
well as network and that New Orleans 
is a great font of talent. 

The pattern that is unfolding in New 
Orleans is unique in some respects but 
not in its over-all meaning to a broad- 
cast advertiser. Not every TV city has 
an internationally famous Mardi Gras, 
but there are very few cities that 
haven't some annual celebrations that 
will make good air visual programs. 
There are cotton, tobacco, grape, apple, 
wheat, and hundreds of other local 
festivals throughout the U. S. that are 
really very colorful pageants. In other 
cities, there are social events which 
have been seen only in newspaper 
photographs but which can be and 
will be brought to the entire localities 
of which they are a part. Even blase 
New York has its Butler's Ball at which 
the hired help proves that it has more 
manners than the Mastah and Milady. 
The air camera will like that. 

Every town big enough to support 
a television station in the manner to 
which it's accustomed, schedules suffi- 
cient sports events to make good tele- 
cast fare. New Orleans hasn't a big 
league baseball team, but American 
Legion baseball was scanned by 
WDSU-TV and sponsored by New 
Orleans Public Service, Inc. Turf fans 
saw their favorites race at the local 
fair grounds under the sponsorship of 
Motorola. The grunts were seen and 
the groans were heard (wrestling en- 
thusiasts cover the nation these days) 
over WDSU-TV, appropriately spon- 
sored by the local Seven-Up bottler. 
Seven-Up shared with the Maison 
Blanche the sponsorship of local pro- 
fessional boxing from the Coliseum 
Arena. The station also covered all 
the important bowling tournaments. 

The participants in these events may 
not be national names in New Orleans 
or most of the other TV cities, but the 
competition is frequently better than in 
championship classes. There are no 
shortages of sports events in most 
areas. The audience for the New York 



king the camera to a night spot is a special event. Here WDSU-TV scans new Orleans' Lenfant's 






AMERICA'S FINEST 
WESTERN ACT"! 




The Texas Rangers, stars of 
stage, screen, radio and tele- 
vision, early this summer made 
a personal appearance tour in 
the Midwest. They are pictured 
here in Oklahoma City, when 
they were commissioned hon- 
orary Colonels of the State of 
Oklahoma by Governor Roy 
J. Turner. 

The Texas Rangers transcrip- 
tions, used on scores of stations 
from coast to coast, have 
achieved Hooperatings as high 
as 27.4. 

Advertisers and stations — ask 
about our new sales plan! 
Wire, write or phone 

ARTHUR B. CHURCH Productions 
KANSAS CITY 6, MISSOURI 



WINSTON-SALEM 




Call The Cops 

A large Winston Salem store 
wanted to sell a stock of 
blue jeans. One announce- 
ment was made over 
WAIRadio exclusively. Re- 
sult: Mob waiting next morn- 
ing to buy blue jeans. Cops 
necessary to keep order. 
Stock soon sold out. Late 
sleepers missed out. 







NORTH CAROLINA 
National Rep: Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



How station KWTO helps 
make spot time buying easier 



KWTO in Springfield, Mo., is one of many radio stations 
using Service-Ads* to put additional buying information at 
time buyers' finger-tips when they're working out station 
selections. 

Here you have useful facts about KWTO's Coverage, Pro- 
gramming, Promotions, and a direct offer of other available 
information. 

The new "Spot Radio Promotion Handbook'' is helping 
many stations do the sort of promotion that keeps you up 
to date on the facts you want to know when you're at 
the point of making decisions. 

For instance, one section of the Handbook describes how 
stations can make real Service-Ads' out of the space 
they use in SRDS — Service Ads" that help you eliminate 
more of the guesswork from your decisions. 

NOTE TO RADIO STATION PROMOTION MANAGERS: 
Extra copies of the "Spot Radio Promotion Handbook" are 
available from us at a dollar a copy. 

'SERVICE-ADS are ads that supplement listings 
in SRDS with useful information that helps buyers 
buy. 



STANDARD RATE & DATA SERVICE, Inc. 

The National Authority Serving the Media-Buying Function 
333 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE CHICAGO 1, III. 

NEW YORK • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 



IP-' 7 




Sorry we had to reduce this 
KWTO Service-Ad* so much. 
You can read it on page 294 
of the SRDS Radio Section for 
June. 




Golden Gloves squared circle, for in- 
stance, is always of capacit) size. Tele- 
casting of both the Glove finals and 
prelims rated high as anj fights aired 
in glove cities, yel these events are 
strictl) amateur. 

New Orleans is the home of Dixie- 
land jazz. Thus WDSU-TV has more 
musical events to air than some other 
towns. New Orleans has a rich musical 
tradition, hut then in other ways so 
have Cincinnati, Denver. St. Louis. 
Boston. San Francisco, and literally 
hundreds of other towns. Local TV sta- 
tions need not worry about scanning 
musical events — if the) really desire 
music to be seen and heard. 

Juvenile-talent programs are eas) 
to telecast, not too difficult to set up 
and generally draw substantial audi- 
ences. There are. of course, good and 
had talent schools in every area but 
finding those schools with worthwhile 
talent is part of a program managers 
job. WDSl -TV has its Telekids on the 
ii r on Sunday afternoons. Like the 
Horn & Hardart Children's Hour, 
heard in different versions on \V\BT 
(New V>rkl and WCAU-TV i Phila- 
delphia I . Telekids does a topnotch 
commercial job. 

While mothers" talented offspring 
are a less expensive show than an 
adult talent search, a New Voices pro- 
gram generally has more on the ball 
when you can see what the voices are 
emanating from. WDSL -TV decided 
to see what talent was available, and 
presented a one time New Voices tele- 
ast from a smart New Orleans night- 
lub. Result: the program is now a 
regular weekly presentation on both 
ADSL and WDSU-TV as a slmul- 
a-t. It serves as a good commercial 
vehicle and at the same time as an 
on-the-air audition for the WDSU-TV 
talent files. 

Some live T\ programs can be in- 
expensive and still draw top audiences. 
One of the ''new voices" had an idea, 
it was built into an audience partici- 
pation scanning. Spot the Stars. Actu- 
ally there's nothing fancy about the 
program. The young lad) shows pic- 
tures of the stars, sings song clues, 
gives some biographical facts, and asks 
the viewers to spot the stars. Mail is 
good. Cost is low. \n\ station and 



he air 



with 



sponsor can put it on 
minimum of cost. 

Most of these are talent programs — 
cm n sportscasts fall into that category. 
There are other visual naturals. Floral 



60 



SPONSOR 




OFFICE 

41 E. 50th ST. 
STUDIOS 

510 W. 57th ST. 
NEW YORK 
lilUllrMMUlil MURRAY HILL 81162 




The case of the 
bonus customer!* 

Seems the man was starting down 
town in his car with a certain pur- 
chase in mind. Had his car radio 
turned on — you can't measure the 
listening in car radios, you know, 
that's all bonus when It comes to 
summer time buying — when he 
heard a KDYL mid-morning pro- 
gram advertising just what he 
wanted at a better price. Result: 
That program sponsor picked up a 
new and substantial customer — a 
bonus customer! 

In Salt Lake City, KDYL and 
KDYL-TV provide plenty of bon- 
uses when it comes to describing 
and showing your products. 

'Abbreviated from one of the many KDYL 
success stories satisfied clients give its. 




Salt Lake City, Utah 
National Representative: John Blair & Co. 



Trail turned out to be a sleeper down 
in New Orleans. Joyce Smith's hobby 
and avocation is gardening. She works 
effortlessly as she passes on hints on 
growing flowers and floral arrange- 
ment. The fact that she just happens 
to be one of the first "Betty Crockers" 
has contributed to an easy microphone 
and camera personality. New Orleans 
loves flowers, but there is also a sizable 
audience in practically every city for 
informative presentations of things 
horticultural. This is another low-cost 
TV program with real audience and 
high promotional possibilities. 

Of recent years merchandisers have 
become more aware of the consumer 
buying backlog that are oldsters, and 
how to sell them. They may be. and 
frequently are, difficult in the home but 
put them on camera with their hobbies 
and they make a really appealing pro- 
gram. WDSU-TV calls its weekly 
visits with talented old folks the Golden 
Age Club. Talent is restricted to men 
and women over 70. The heart-appeal 
is tops, and oldsters enjoy looking at 
other oldsters, as well. 

News on TV stations assumes real 
stature when it includes adequate local 
coverage as well as national filming. 
As yet it's difficult to cover local events 
with film or with remote camera 
crews. News doesn't occur at program 
times — but at any time of the day. 
WDSU-TV has worked out an arrange- 
ment with the New Orleans Item which 
enables the station to present picture 
stories on a program called Item Pix. 
These are not motion pictures, but 
they still give the viewers a picture- 
eye view of the news, frequently before 
the Item has the news on the street. 
The news problem is one of TV's 
greatest problems. It has not been 
solved — nationally or locally as yet. 

In lieu of real pictorial coverage of 
news, the still-picture routine, via a tie- 
up with a local newspaper, goes a long 
way to reporting news pictorially. 

Local programing in TV has a long 
way to go. Even with the millions be- 
hind WPIX (Daily News) in New 
York, the station hasn't even touched 
bottom in bringing the story of New 
York to New York. The best station 
buy in TV today or in the next five 
years to come — and maybe much 
longer — will be judged by a slide rule 
alibrated with local program measure- 
ments. 

Don't ignore network affiliations, 
either. Milton Berle can do a great 
deal for any station. -* * -* 




IIIHEN we say "circus" we mean it. In 
il the past two weeks, "Bozo's Circus," 
in addition to other Big Top acts, brough 
to the center ring a real live trained cow 
pony and a shiny seal, bark and all. Need 
less to say, the over-100 kids on stage 
were bug-eyed, while hundreds in the au 
ditorium were practically all standing up 

Ask any youngster who Bozo is, and 
you'll find he's far and away the top kid- 
die's recording star (Capitol Records). 
Besides being a natural for any product 
appealing to the younger set, "Bozo's Cir- 
cus" has loads of tailor-made merchan- 
dising features, ready for action today. 
Radio Sales boys have all the answers. 

WE haven't been able to find any writ- 
ers working regularly in television 
anywhere who have Hal Fimberg's cred- 
its. Hal is such a modest guy, that it 
wasn't until yesterday we discovered he's 
the same fellow who gets four-figure 
weekly salaries in radio and movies. He 
gets four figures with us, only we move 
the decimal ! Actually he rates all those 
clams, since he wrote three Abbott and 
Costello, one Marx Brothers, and three 
other screen plays, plus writing and di- 
recting "Meet Me At Parky's" on radio. 

He's writing for Hawthorne, our zany 
comedian. Hawthorne is a real bet for 
an advertiser who wants popularity proof 
. . . Hawthorne's fan club already has 
6500 bona fide members. And Fimberg's 
comedy writing will bring in many more, 
now the show has started over KTTV. 

SOUTHERN California is noted for the 
extraordinary, but they're all shaking 
their heads at TV. On July 1, we jumped 
to 153,581 sets. 

DON'T worry about television in Los 
Angeles . . . just call us or your near- 
est Radio Sales Office for the top availa- 
bilities. 



KTTV 



TIMES «CBS TELEVISION 



LOS ANGELES 



15 AUGUST 1949 



61 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS^ 



Sponsor Wanted 

Once again SPONSOR must forego 
naming the "Sponsor of the Year." 
Neither on a national nor a local level 
has one advertiser used broadcast ad- 
vertising much more effectively or 
more imaginatively than the rest <>f 
the field. This doesn't mean that broad- 
cast advertising hasn't continued to do 
a top-drawer job for thousands of ad- 
vertisers, but that for the most part 
they have permitted the industry itself 
to set the program and advertising 
pace. 

I f one organization could be named 
the pace-setter, it might be the Texas 



Company with it- sponsorship on tele- 
vision of Milton Berle. Texaco also 
rates verv high for it- pitchman com- 
mercials, which are as entertaining as 
Berle himself. 

Texaco came as close as am or- 
ganization to being the sponsor of the 
1948-1949 season. It unfortunately 
didn't meet all the requirements we 
have set for Sponsor of the Year . . . 
But don't sell Texaco short. Remember 
how it dominated the air with the 
Firechief, Ed Wynn, not too many 
years ago. 

Whisky is no help 

Let's not becloud the issue. Hard 
liquor advertising does not belong on 
the air. Freedom of the ether has 
nothing to do with the case. The fact 
that magazines and newspapers carry 
copy for the alcohol interests has 
nothing to do with the issue. The fact 
that programs carrying tippling ad- 
vertising do not have to be dialed has 
nothing to do with the case. 

Radio and television are living-room 
advertising mediums. It's impossible 
to send the children to bed when 
mother and dad decide to tune so- 
called adult programs. Any broadcast 
advertising is advertising addressed to 
and reaching all ages. What a com- 
mercial announcer intones is generallv 
accepted as gospel. One cant separate 



advertising and editorial on the air. 
Broadcast hard liquor advertising can 
< nlv mean endorsement of hard liquor 
by all who serve or use the air. 

National policy makes liquor avail- 
able for those who desire it. But this 
policy was not intended to inspire 
more drinking. Broadcast advertising 
can only inspire more drinking by 
drinkers and non-drinkers alike. 

sponsor feels that there are plenty 
of mediums in which the liquor in- 
dustry can spin the tale of its wares. 
Liquor need not come into the living 
rooms of the nation to lend added re- 
spectability for drinkers. If some 
networks and stations should be so 
impolitic as to take alcoholic advertis- 
ing, it behooves other advertisers to 
act to prevent it. If station and/or 
network continuity departments pass 
programs in which characters have 
names resembling whisky brands, it 
also means that other sponsors who 
have an interest in keeping broadcast 
advertising a family medium must 
make appropriate moves to stop it 
before the disease spreads. 

If broadcasters require new sources 
of income, there are better long-term 
ways of opening up the treasury than 
bv admitting distilled spirits. 

Liquor must not be peddled in the 
living room of 40,000.000 American 
homes. Hard liquor advertising must 
be kept off the air. 



Applause 



Radio's reawakening 

For a short while it appeared as 
though radio networks and stations 
were going to permit television to take 
over broadcast advertising without 
even the pretense of a battle. Broad- 
casting authorities, almost without ex- 
ception, predicted that in from three 
to five years the aural medium would 
be a dead duck. A number of broad- 
cast advertisers announced that their 
entire budgets would go to the visual 
medium despite the fact that it 
reached only certain sections of the 
country and just a part of the popula- 
tion in those sections. 

Television was capturing the imagi- 
nations of hundreds of sponsor execu- 
tive-, main of whom are frustrated 



showmen and would be theatrical en- 
trepreneurs. Contracts were signed for 
programs and newsreels with fantastic 
sums involved per possible viewer. 
All that anybody required to get in 
to see the president of a great adver- 
tiser was to replace abracadabra with 
video. 

As the fall approaches, this concept 
of broadcast advertising is changing. 
Television isn't being discounted as a 
medium, but the forthright approach 
of the broadcasting industry to the 
problem is convincing advertisers that 
radio is still the world's most powerful 
advertising medium and one that 
may never be replaced. 

Networks and stations will spend 
more money and use more grey matter 
than ever to promote increased listen- 



ing. Stations will not rest on web 
laurels, and those which dominate their 
markets will try to make their domi- 
nance permanent. The air will be used 
to sell an even higher grade of radio 
entertainment. Every form of advertis- 
ing will be used to sell the millions 
who listen to listen more- 

This doesn't mean that the TV sta- 
tions won't be in there battling for 
viewers too. But its going to be a 
two-way battle. 

The result can mean only one thing 
— more listening — more viewing — 
more broadcast advertising. 

Together, radio and video will do 
a lot to pull a "declining economy" 
into an incline. It will not be done 
without promotion but radio is promo- 
tion-minded todav . 



62 



SPONSOR 



eighth in a series explaining why 
SPONSOR is the best buy 



BIOW 



and 



MAXON 



have plenty 



"**— «*w*^ 





in common 




' ^^Biow Company 
^2j* Subscriptions to SPONSOR 



10 



Home 



5 Office 



4 Sa 

L 



Executives 4 Timebuyers 2 
Account Exec 1 Others 2 

Radio Dir 1 

Some Biow clients who subscribe: Bulova 
Watch, Eversharp, Philip Morris, Procter & 
Gamble, Schenley Distillers. 



Maxon Inc. 






Subscriptions to SPONSOR 


5 


Home 3 


Office 


2 


Executives 2 


Radio Dir 


1 


Account Exec 1 


Timebuyer 


1 



Some Maxon clients who subscribe: General 
Electric Co., Gillette Safety Razor, H. J. 
Heinz. 



^ 



* , *Hh. 




Sure, every advertising agency's 

technique is different. But 
radio-minded souls at Maxon and 
Biow have one thing in common: 
their use of SPONSOR. That's 
plenty . . . for they give it plenty 
of use. 
Check any national advertiser or 
agency executive involved in the 
broadcast media and you'll get 
very much the same story . . . 
plenty of SPONSOR readership, 
f plenty of enjoyment, plenty of talk 
about its contents, plenty of 

practical use. There's no 
secret in sponsor's rapid rise. 
It gives the sponsor and his agency 

what they need to understand, 
evaluate, and use broadcast adver- 
tising. There's a prestige ac- 
ceptance of sponsor that's tailor- 
ade for your advertising message. 




Three out of every four copies of SPONSOR (8,000 guar- 
anteed) go to buyers of broadcast advertising. An average 
of 10% paid subscriptions go to readers at each of the top 
20 radio-billing advertising agencies. 



"SPONSOR really keeps us posted on 
what's going on in radio and television 
advertising." 

ETHEL WIEDER, 
Timebuyer, Biow 



"SPONSOR is a regular in our Maxon 
radio and television departments. It's solid 
reading from cover to cover." 



You're sure to hit home with sponsors 
and agencies when you advertise in SPONSOR 



ED WILHELM, 
Timebuyer, Maxon 




SPONSOR 

40 West 52 Sfreef, New York 19 
r buyers of Radio and TV odverti 








930 KILOCYCLES-NBC 

OKLAHOMA CITY 







Represented by The Katz Agency, Inc. 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING COMPANY • WKY, OKLAHOMA CITY • THE DAILY OKLAHOMAN, OKLAHOMA CITY TIMES ■ THE FARMER STOCKMAN 



29 AUGUST 1949 • $8.00 a year 



AUG 29 1949 




Adam likes a fight — p. 30 
Disk jockey: air phenomenon — p. 28 
Vaseline's 21 years — p. 23 
How to predict TV costs — p. 57 



What's wrong with C E. Hooper's city ratings? — p. 26 



Ninth in a series explaining why 
SPONSOR is the best buy 



The welcome mat 

is always out at 




RUTHRAUFF 



>»»* 



&RYAN 



ahd 



In San Francisco, as in New York and 
Chicago, sponsor ucts the lion's share of the 
broadcast-minded agency executive's 
reading attention. There's good 
reason, sponsor is directly linked to 
his dollars-and-cents return from radio and 
television. Its his practical- 
application business paper. It's 100 ( /i devoted 
to his buying interests, and to his client's. 
\\ hen you're looking for a 
market-place for your advertis- 
ing message, the logical loca- 
tion is SPONSOR. 



HONIG- 
COOPER 



"SPO.\S()R presents tne type o] 
factual information helpful to the 
UgenC) anil client in dealing with 
radio and television problems. It 
receives through readership in our 
firm." 

ROSS METZGER. 

VP & Radio Director. 




"SPONSOR contains more mealy 
case histories of advertising in 
action than any other trade pub- 
lication in the field.'' 

IOlIS H0N1G 









h 



*'9'*Mk* 



c e e o, 



70. 



'-*« 



8 f 




V% 




4 



Three out of every four copies (8.000 guarantee) 
go to national and regional advertisers and 
their advertising agencies. An average of 10Vi 
paid subscriptions go to readers at each 
of the 20 top radio-billing advertising agencies. 



You're sure to hit home 
with sponsors and agencies 
when you advertise in SPONSOR 



Hr 






°6. 




J? 



** 



w 



s 



^ 



^ 



4 °'9. f 



%. 



% 







Wh 




.# 







TS. . .SPONSOR REPORTS. . 




..SPONSOR REPORT 



29 August 1949 



Industry thinks 

FCC giveaway ban 

won't hold up 



UP. map sponsor 

Western football 

telecasts 



Brewers worry 

about liquor 

on air 



More advertising 
lifts food sales 



Gruen widens 
sales outlets 



Wisconsin study 

shows listeners 

want FM 



Both because "lotteries" are province of Justice Department and 
programs are not province of FCC, sponsors and broadcasters believe 
FCC ban on giveaway shows, effective 1 October, won't stick. (See 
Sponsor Speaks, page 70.) ABC and CBS will take action to decide on 
fate of some 50 giveaways on networks. 

-SR- 
Union Pacific, biggest railroad advertiser, may shoot part of 
$2,500,000 annual advertising wad into TV. U.P. is considering TV 
sponsorship this fall of major Far West football games, kinescoping 
them to cities between Omaha and Los Angeles. 

-SR- 
U. S. Brewers Foundation, long active in divorcing beer from "hard 
liquor," has joined forces seeking to keep whisky off air. One 
beer executive estimated beer as spending $15,000,000 yearly on 
radio. Publishers Information Bureau reports beer network radio 
time in first half of 1949 at $456,438, against $461,770 in first 
half of 1948. But this is only fraction of beer money on air. 

-SR- 
Grocery Manufacturers of America, surveying 102 member companies, 
notes mixed dollar sales and profit picture in first half of 1949 
but tonnage volume larger than first half of 1948. GMA cited in- 
troduction of new products and larger ad volume for tonnage gain. 

-SR- 
Gruen Watch, returning to network radio after many years ("Holly- 
wood Calling," NBC, through Grey Agency), is adding department 
stores to distribution setup. Until now Gruen has sold only 
through jewelers. 

-SR- 
WHA, University of Wisconsin station in Madison, has found that 
four of five surveyed there who do not own FM receivers say they'll 
insist on FM when they buy new sets. 



"Mike" Hughes and Bernard Piatt Come to SPONSOR 

sponsor is happy to announce the appointment of Lawrence "Mike" Hughes as editor and Bernard 
Piatt as business manager, effective 1 September 1949. Mr. Hughes joins sponsor after five years as 
executive editor of advertising age. Prior to that time he served as associate editor of sales manage- 
ment and advertising columnist of the NEW YORK sun. He is known as "Mike" to account executives, 
presidents of advertising firms, timebuyers, and advertising managers from coast to coast. Mr. Piatt 
comes to sponsor after 17 years at broadcasting, where he served as circulation director, Yearbook 
editor, and in other executive capacities. He is recognized as a business paper circulation authority. 



SPONSOE, Volume 3. No. 20. 29 Au^u^t. 1949. Published biweeklv bv SPONSOlt Publications Inc.. 3110 Elm. Baltimore 11. Md. Executive. Advertising. Editorial. Circulation 
Offices 40 W. 52 St., N. Y. 19. N. Y. $8 a year in U. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. postofflce under Act 3 March 1879. 



29 AUGUST 1949 



PORTS. . .SPONSOR RE PORTS. .. SPONSOR RE 



Sales Executives 
would sell selling 



Rural network 
links farm co-ops 



ABC lets stations 

sell time in its 

cooperative shows 



FCC can't ban 
liquor ads 



Urges $1,000,000 

fund for daytime 

TV research 

Eells launches 
$150,000 "Brown 
Derby" e.t. series 

Barrere plans 

clearing house 

for transcriptions 



National Sales Executives, Inc., may run cooperatively-sponsored 
13-week network program to promote selling as a career. NSEI is 
composed of nearly 100 Sales Executives clubs in U.S. and other 
countries. 

-S3- 
Grange League Federation groups in 40 communities of New York state 
were linked together 18 August in three-hour program by Rural Radio 
Network, FM system orignated by 10 farm organizations. Cooperative 
G.L.F. Exchange, Inc., parent of these groups, Is largest farm- 
producer co-op. 

-SR- 
ABC has begun to permit local affiliates to sell announcements on 
all its co-op programs, except weekly one-hour "Town Meeting of the 
Air" and five-a-week half-hour "Breakfast in Hollywood." Under 
plan some programs provide up to 15 announcements per week. 

-SR- 
FCC has told Edwin C. Johnson, Senate Interstate Commerce Committee 
chairman, that it can't prevent liquor ads on air. But FCC said 
it can deny license renewal to station offenders. 

-SR- 
"Television Grey Matter" of Grey Advertising Agency suggests 
$1,000,000 joint research fund provided by set producers and broad- 
casters to explore opportunities of daytime TV. 

-SR- 
Broadcasters Program Syndicate, co-op station e.t. group headed by 
Bruce Eells, will spend $150,000 per year to turn out "Hollywood 
Brown Derby," new f ive-quarter-hour-a-week series. 

-SR- 
Claude Barrere, formerly in charge of syndicated sales at NBC, is 
planning to start central information service in New York which 
would serve sponsors and agencies on e.t.'s similar to way travel 
agents suggest routes and costs to travelers. 

—Please turn to page 36- 



IN THIS ISSUE 



capsuled highlights 



Twenty-one years of the "common touch" in page 23 
broadcasting have helped Chesebrough sell a 
lot of Vaseline products. 

Critics find City Hooperatings are a less- page 26 
than-adequate aid for scheduling selective 
radio campaigns. 

Thousands of disk jockeys employ multiple page 28 
techniques to help sponsors move mountains 
of merchandise. 

Elias Lustig of Adam Hats sponsors a dif- page 30 

ferent kind of fight with the signing of news- 
caster Drew Pearson. 

The station is a vital factor in making page 32 
manufacturer-retailer co-op advertising work. 



Better timebuying starts with the use of a page 34 

half-dozen basic publications and research 
services. 

The new Ross service helps advertisers pre- page 57 
diet cost of television shows by fype and 
length. It gives specific costs of specific shows. 

IN FUTURE ISSUES 

Are giveaways good business? 12 Sept. 

Schwerin measures interest variations of TV 12 Sept. 

viewers. 

Building disk-jockey audiences: part 2 12 Sept. 

Foreign-language stations tailor programs 26 Sept. 
to markets. 



SPONSOR 



IflMN . . . SPONSORS REPORT . 



SPONSORS REPORT . . 



Dear Lynn : 

Although the business of spring house cleaning still goes on, our 
special sale of house cleaning items is over and I want to write 
this personal note of appreciation to you and your associates for 
your enthusiastic and helpful assistance in promoting this event. 

In my opinion it was the most successful event of its kind that 
has been sponsored by any branch of the food industry in this 
market for many years. It would have been impossible for us to 
achieve such results without your assistance and I want you to 
know we all feel deeply indebted to you as well as to your 
clients who have cooperated so effectively. 

The results achieved by this sale have demonstrated the need for 
close cooperation between manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers and 
advertising media in efforts to sponsor successful sales events. 

Perhap we can cooperate on something of this kind again in the not 
too distant future. I assure you it will be a pleasure to work 
with you whenever a suitable opportunity comes. Again our thanks 
to you and your associates of KALL and the Intermountain Network for 
an excellent demonstration of effective service in behalf of your 
clients and the distributors in the wholesale and retail trades. 



21 HOME TOWN MARKETS COMPRISE 
THE INTERMOUNTAIN NETWORK 



UTAH 

KALI, Salt Lake City 
KLO, Ogden 
KOVO, Provo 
KOAL, Price 
KVNU, Logan 
KSVC, Richfield 
KSUB, Cedar City 

IDAHO 

KFXD, Boise-Nampa 
KFXO-FM, Boise-Nampa 
KVMV, Twin Falls 
KEYY, Pocatello 
KID, Idaho Falls 



WYOMING 

KVRS, Rock Springs 
KOWB, Laramie 
KDFN, Casper 
KWYO, Sheridan 
KPOW, Powell 

MONTANA 

KBMY, Billings 
KRJF, Miles City 
KMON, Great Falls 
KOPR, Butte 

NEVADA 

KRAM, Las Vegas 



THE 



Sincerely yours, 
Donald P. Lloyd 
Manager 
ASSOCIATED FOOD STORES, Inc 



INTERMOUNTAIN 
NETWORK Inc 




New York 



Chicago 



/, Inc. National Representatives 

Los Angolts — San Francisco — Atlanta 



29 AUGUST 1949 



VOL 3 *>■ W 



V MlOlfl «« 





SPONSOR REPORTS 


1 




40 WEST 52 


4 




OUTLOOK 


8 




MR. SPONSOR: J. WHITNEY PETERSON 


10 


P. s. 


12 


NEW AND RENEW 


17 




CHESEBROUGHS COMMON TOUCH 


23 




FAULTS OF CITY HOOPERATINGS 


26 




DISK JOCKEY: AIR PHENOMENON 


28 


ADAM LIKES A FIGHT 


30 


STATIONS AND DEALER CO-OPS 

I 


32 


TOOLS FOR TIMEBUYING 


34 


MR. SPONSOR ASKS 


38 


4-NETWORK TV COMPARAGRAPH 


51 


111 TV TRENDS 

1 


56 


TOU CAN PREDICT TV COSTS 


57 


CONTESTS AND OFFERS 


64 


SPONSOR SPEAKS 


70 




APPLAUSE 


70 




Published biweeklj bj SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
Executive. Editorial, and Advert Id Offl > 10 West 52 

Street. New "i -. k 19, N 1 Telep Plaza 1-6211 

\ \i h, .an Avenue. Telephone: Fi- 
nancial 1550, Pub] :al i Of) 3110 Elm, Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: i nited State* 58 ■ year, Canada and 
foreign - oples 50c, Pi Inted In r s. A Copy 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

ol and Publisher: Norman It Glenn, Secretary 

i la m I Qlenn Editor: Law 1 1 nee M 

i Edltoi Prank Bannister, Charles 

Dan Rlchman Editorial Department: Stella 

Gould. Ait Director: Howard vVechsler 

Le ter i Blumenthal. Advertising 

Department: M n LeBang, Beatrice Turner. Business 

Uai i Bernard Platl Chicago Manage] lern Glynn, 

i ■ ilal on Vlanag Milton K&ye, Circulation De 

■ ' ■ Marcla CI En iv CutUlo, Secretary to 

Publiahei \ 

i n\ i.i: I'n i i be c E Hoopei ol C E Hooni r, Inc., 
whose Clb H in wel bed bj SPONSOR'S 

round wanting, 



40 West 52nd 



VACATION BUSINESS 

Your article. Hon to sample a vaca- 
tion, appearing in the 1 August issue. 
inlerested us ver\ much. We have 
been broadcasting two programs a 
\\<rk from Kstes Park. (Colorado, and 
have found thai it made an excellent 
program f<>r us and reall) did a job 
for the advertisers. They have had 
much "repeat business, and have in- 
creased their business while others 
have seen business dwindling. 

We would like to <;ct five copies of 
the article or five copies of that parti- 
cular issue for further use with other 
advertisers. 

Jack Hitchcock 

Program director 

KCOL, Fort Collins. Colo. 



TV STATION BREAK 

\l\ compliments on the article you 
published last issue on The TV station 
break. 1 believe it is the most intelli- 
gent and comprehensive treatment of 
the subject I've seen in print todav. 
Ad Multos Annos! 

Don L. Kearney 
Katz Agency 
New York 



"IT'S STILL RADIO" 

Please accept my thanks, as a dyed- 
in-the-wool NABer. for \our exception- 
ally well-written editorial. NAB: A 
Progress Report. 

From time to time I have wondered 
if 1 were getting myself a reputation 
for being a left-winger when I advo- 
cated changing ". . . sights from Wash- 
ington to the 48 states — from the FCC 
to the broadcast advertiser." It was a 
source of much gratification to me to 
discover SPONSOR openly sponsoring 
that very idea. It represents the think- 
ing of a goodly segment of American 
broadcasters - - broadcasters whose 
criticisms of NAB have been designed 
for the sole purpose of pointing the 
way toward a stronger national organ- 
ization. 

In a bulletin mailed to the member- 
ship of the Tennessee Association of 
Broadcasters under date of 21 June 
1949, I said: 

"My personal feeling always has 
been that the NAB should have as its 
(Please turn to page 6 1 





IN BMB 
IN HOOPER 

IN THE SOUTHS 

FIRST MARKET 



i To sell Houston 

and the great 

Gulf Coast area 

Buy KPRC 

FIRST in Everything 
that Counts! 





29 AUGUST 1949 




DCS! QUin only real way to 

evaluate advertising is as it is related to 
cost-of-sale. That's why we built a 
bargain package in a WNAO-WDUK com- 
bination offer. Use both stations in combi- 
nation — get both markets — and a "whale" 
of a discount. That's sure to mean lower 
sales costs with a greater market. 

You furnish the bait and the line — we've 
got the hooks. Avery-Knodel, our "reps" 
will tell you where the best fishin' is — 
you'll find a representative in New York, 
Atlanta, Chicago, San Francisco and Los 
Angeles. 

you'll do better with the 
same line. .-and 2 hooks! 



ft ONE NETWORK, ABC 
ft ONE LOW RATE 
ft 2 KEY OUTLETS 

NORTH CAROLINA'S LARGEST METROPOLITAN MARKET 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 4) 

primary objectives the promotion of 
good advertising (result-getting) prac- 
tices, operation 'in the public interest.' 
and showmanship. In my humble 
opinion, far too much time has been 
laud is being) devoted to discussions 
regarding the FCC, ASCAP, BMI, 
copyrights, federal legislation, etc., etc. 
"However, I am one of those indi- 
\ iduals who feel that — regardless of 
the inadequacies of NAB — it is essen- 
tial to the future progress and pros- 
perity of broadcasting that we main- 
tain at the fullest possible strength an 
organization that includes all phases of 
our industry . . . after all. whether it's 
\\l. I \l. TV. or whathaveyou it's 
still radio and that's what we're all in 
the business to promote." 

The establishment of BAB — headed 
b\ the incomparable Maurice Mitchell 
— is certainly a step in the right direc- 
tion. If subsequent moves are made 
with equal care, the time is not far off 
when we shall not have the need to 
worry about resignations from the 
NAB'. 

F. C. SOWELL 

President 

Tennessee Ass'n of Broadcasters 



"LET'S SELL OPTIMISM" 

Congrats on your recent piece, "Let's 
sell optimism." We here at WIRE 
heartily agree and will push it in this 
market. 

If all of us in the radio industry 
would get behind the idea, we'd be 
better off — "revenue-wise" and "ulcer- 
wise." 

Yours for more optimism. 
Daniel C. Park 
General Sales Manager 
WIRE. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Just received optimism brochure. 
We start next week. Send us statistics 
immediately. Were all for it. 

Jack Weldon 
WWOD 
Lynchburg, Va. 



I have your reprint of the letter to 
Bill Rine. 

I'm \our boy — shoot me everything 
(Please turn to page 14) 



SPONSOR 



Things 




in/Duluth.. 




are 
Even-Steven 



Sales potential in the Duluth-Superior Market isn't weighted by conditions elsewhere. Our 
population has no over-balance of either the very rich or the very poor. It's a balanced 
market of middle-class folks whose Spend Ability maintains a high level despite economic 
variation in other areas. Things are always "Even-Steven" in Duluth. This market belongs 
on the list for your next campaign. 



WEBC * DULUTH-SUPERIOR * KDAL 



NBC 

29 AUGUST 1949 



MINNESOTA 



WISCONSIN 



CBS 



Forecasts of things to come, as 
seen l>\ SPONSOR'S nlitors 



Outlook 



Major appliance makers 
increase production 

In mid-August both Wcstinghouse and Frigidaire an- 
nounced that they were stepping up refrigeration produc- 
tion sharply, and General Electric was expected to follow 
suit. A serious shortage had developed in smaller-cubic- 
foot sizes. Westinghouse will continue at the new rate until 
earh October, when it changes over gradually to 1950 
models. 



Dun & Bradstreet survey shows 
greater optimism in business 

Business in the second half of 1949 will be only sligbth 
below the level of 1948. Dun & Bradstreet has found from 
a survey of 801 manufacturing, wholesale and retail ex- 
ecutives. Although the findings closely parallel those of 
similar surveys made last spring, D&B noted a somewhat 
more optimistic trend. One-third of participants expect 
net sales to be higher in the latter half of this year. 

Near-record crops may 
bring more promotion 

The nation's Big Three crops — corn, wheat, and cotton — 
again are expected to reach near-record levels this year. 
Heavy carryovers and lower prices are expected to cause 
groups in these industries to increase promotion. Mean- 
while,- Western beet sugar producers plan to spend $1,000,- 
000 a year for three years in a campaign for a larger 
share of the $400,000,000-a-year sugar business (whole- 
sale prices) west of the Mississippi. Western apple growers 
are faced with the problem of selling profitably a crop 
estimated at 40,000.000 bushels larger than in 1948. Cali- 
fornia orange growers may step up efforts to meet the 
rising popularity of Florida frozen orange juice. The cran- 
berry crop is down 30%. 

Jewelers expect more 
business this fall 

After an estimated first-half decline of 7 r < in retail 
jewelry sales, American National Retail Jewelers Asso- 
ciation has predicted a fall pick-up in business and is 
fairly optimistic about Christmas volume. Part of larger 
manufacturer volume would be to fill depleted retail in- 
ventories. 

Reserve Board sees greater 
activity in construction 

Recent contract awards indicate that construction acti\it\ 
will "expand moderately in the near future," reports Fed- 
eral Reserve Board. Public work would continue to repre- 
sent a relatively large proportion of total non-residental 
building. 

"New York Times" finds 
ad budgets expanding 

The Sew York Turn's reports that many advertisers who 
had cut back budgets earlier this year are expanding them, 
both to meet competition and because they believe the 
"pickin's" will be there. 



Los Angeles building awards 
break peacetime records 

Aided by a $25,000,000 plant for Lever Brothers Com- 
panv. new-construction awards in Los Angeles county in 
July reached the record peacetime mark of $34,115,000. 
This figure was nearly half of the county's seven-month 
total of $72,435,000. 

Low-priced cars may get 
larger share of market 

With low-priced cars accounting for an increased share 
of total General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler sales, the 
low-priced trend is expected to be accentuated soon with 
introduction of smaller cars by Hudson. Nash, and Kaiser- 
Frazer. Those would be almost in the Ford-Chevrolet- 
Plvmouth price class. Studebaker has made a lot of sales 
progress with a lower-medium-priced car. which sells at 
only about $200 more than a Chevrolet. 

Weather and caution cause 
department-store decline 

Department-store sales in early August declined sharply, 
10' < . from a year ago. This contrasted with a dip of only 
.V « in dollar sales for the first seven months of this year. 
The Wall Street Journal found various reasons for it. 
among them unemployment in some areas, consumers' 
'"price cut psychology," but especially the hot weather. 

Shippers may pay $250,000,000 
in increased freight rates 

Average boost of 3.7 r < in freight rates, authorized by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission effective 1 September, is 
expected by Standard & Poor's service to add $250,000,000 
annually to the bill paid by the nation's shippers. With in- 
auguration of the 40-hour week for non-operating railroad 
employes, the additional costs had been expected to reach 
$380,000,000. But the higher rates are expected to throw 
some of this to motor carriers. 

Columbia-RCA "war" will expand 
record sales and promotion 

With Decca joining the side of Columbia in introducing 
33V3 r.p.m. records, and RCA-Victor reportedly appro- 
priating a $1,000,000 ""war chest" to back its 45 r.p.m. 
platter, the record makers are expected to go all out in 
promotion this fall. All of which would help to stimulate 
record sales. Recent surveys have shown Columbia s 
records to be outselling the new \ ictor platters. 



3 



SPONSOR 



Special events 

Build audi«*ii<*«' friendship 

Ed uca1 ion tlireetor's European tour. 

state fairs highlight busy summer at WIS. C'hieago 



ADVERTISEMENT 




Never a station to let pass an oppor- 
tunity to cement friendships with lis- 
teners, WLS in Chicago has a full 
summer of special events broadcasts 
scattered over the four states where the 
WLS audience is concentrated. Parti- 
cipation in three state fairs, civic cele- 
brations, Chicago Railroad Fair, square 
dance contest and a trip to Europe by 
the station's education director high- 
light the long list. 

Twelve thousand people jammed the 
grandstand at the Illinois State Fair 
in Springfield when the WLS National 
Barn Dance was presented as opening 
night attraction — as it has been every 
fair year since 1929. Dinnerbell Time, 
oldest farm service program in radio, 
originated from the WLS tent all fair 
week. WLS headquarters featured, as 
usual, checkroom facilities, picnic 
tables, exhibits picturing talent and 
station events during its 25-year his- 
tory. Two free stage shows daily by 
Captain Stubby and the Buccaneers 
drew capacity houses, and hundreds of 
visitors participated in flower arrang- 
ing contests. 

Exhibits were torn down Friday 
afternoon, shipped to Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, where we set up for Saturday's 
opening of the Wisconsin State Fair. 
Dinnerbell, flower contests, stageshows, 
checkroom, etc. were all repeated in 
Milwaukee for a week. 

Then, with only a week intervening, 
the whole program will be repeated 
the first week in September at the 
Indiana State Fair in Indianapolis. 

Farther from home, at another fair, 
the WLS National Barn Dance played 
before 10,000 people in Phillips, Texas, 
at the invitation of the local Lions 
Club. The entire cast of the Phillips 
66 National Barn Dance, which WLS 
feeds to the ABC network, was flown 
to Texas for this special show. 

Barn dance entertainment received 
a tremendous boost in Chicago too. 
The station teamed up with the Chicago 
Park District and the Sun-Times in 
a summer-long series of Square Dance 
contests. Finals were staged on Michi- 
gan Boulevard before 20,000 specta- 
tors, with headliners from the WLS 
National Barn Dance as featured en- 

29 AUGUST 1949 




Mrs. Josephine Wetzler 
Director of Education, WLS 

tertainers. Preliminary contests in the 
parks each drew from 4.000 to 10,000 
spectators. The Square Dance Festival 
resulted in columns and columns of 
WLS stories and pictures in the Chi- 
cago Sun-Times — 600 inches in June 
alone! 

Another bigtime Chicago success for 
WLS was the appearance of Captain 
Stubby and the Buccaneers at the Rail- 
road Fair. The Rock Island Railroad 
declared one Sunday "Buccaneers 
Day" at their Rocket Village, later 
reported: "a terrific hit . . . attendance 
was one of the heaviest in Rocket Vil- 
lage in the two years running of the 
Railroad Fair." 

In surburban Chicago, Martha Crane 
and Helen Joyce were featured as 
headliners of Homemakers' Day at the 
Villa Park Pioneer Days celebration 
for the second year. Almost an hour 
before show time every seat in the 
Villa Theater was taken by listeners 
anxious to see Martha and Helen 
broadcast their WLS Feature Foods 
program and a stage show by Red 
Blanchard and the Sage Riders. 

Another surburban event: Dinner- 
bell Time was broadcast from the U.S. 
Naval Air Station at Glenview when 
the Flying Farmers of Prairie Farmer- 
land held their annual field day there. 

September 12 will see Dinnerbell 



originating at the Illinois Feed Asso- 
ciation convention in Springfield. On 
September 23. the broadcast will come 
from Kewanee (111.) Hog Day — in 
Henry County, which has more hogs 
than any other county in the nation. 
In early summer, the program origin- 
ated at Harvard (111.) Milk Day, which 
WLS has helped boost from a few hun- 
dred in attendance in 1942 to 15,000 
spectators this year. 

All is not barn dancing and farm 
service at WLS, however. Josephine 
Wetzler, director of education at WLS, 
will fly to Germany in September, at 
the invitation of Army Headquarters 
in Heidelberg, for a tour of German 
Youth Centers in the occupied zone. 
Mrs. Wetzler will also tour England 
and Scotland, to make tape recordings 
of life there. Mrs. Wetzler's invitation 
to Germany is the result of numerous 
WLS programs featuring the work of 
German Youth Activities. Her Euro- 
pean programs will be featured on 
Dinnerbell. Prairie Farmer Air Edition 
and on School Time. This latter pro- 
gram won the top ranking duPont 
award last year. 

These are only a few of the things 
WLS has been doing. The station has 
carried its several daily weather re- 
ports, its regular ABC network pro- 
grams, its own distinctive "WLS-built" 
features. All in all, the station has 
lived up to its quarter-century record : 
it serves the needs, the wants of its 
listeners. It serves because it knows. 
WLS asks its listeners what they wish 
to hear — and listeners respond with a 
million letters a year. WLS knows . . , 
because WLS goes out among its lis- 
teners, meets them, talks with them, 
finds out from them exactly how to 
program to be a part of living. That's 
why WLS is "one of the family" in 
Midwest America. That's why WLS 
Gets Results. 

This is an advertisement of WLS, 
the Prairie Farmer station, 1230 
Washington Boulevard, Chicago 7, 
Illinois. 50,000-watts. 890 kilocycles. 
ABC affiliate. National representa- 
tives, John Blair and Company. 

ADVERTISEMENT 



for profitable 
selling - 

INVESTIGATE 



WDEL 



WILMINGTON 

DEL. 



WGAL 



LANCASTER 

PENNA. 



WKBO 



HARRISBURG 

PENNA. 



WORK 



YORK 

PENNA. 



WRAW 



READING 

PENNA. 



WEST 



EASTON 

PENNA. 



Represented by 

§g2g ROBERT MEEKER 

ASSOCIATES 




New York 
San Francisco 



Chicago 
Los Angeles 



Clair R. McCollough 
Managing Director 

STEINMAN STATIONS 




Mr. Sponsor 



•#. Whilnvy B*v1vrson 

President 
United States Tobacco Co., N.Y. 



When rock-jawed, handsome J. Whitney Peterson lights up his 
pipe to relax, it's always filled with one of the United States Tobacco 
Company's smoking tobaccos. He views with a cold eye those who 
do otherwise. As boss of the firm that is the worlds largest producer 
of snuff, and one of the major makers of pipe tobaccos (Model, 
Dills Best. Old Briar, and Tweed), Peterson tirelessly searches for 
ideas that will increase his firm's business, although few things 
please him less than any sort of public or journalistic kudos for his 
efforts. Peterson has been president of United States Tobacco since 
1946, and since then net sales have jumped 12.5%. He is largely 
responsible for jockeying U.S.T. into a strong position (1948 net 
sales: $20,721,206) in a highly competitive industry. 

One good reason is: Peterson knows every angle of his firms 
manufacturing and selling operations, and keeps ahead of all its 
developments. In the 28 years that Peterson has been continuously 
with U.S.T.. he has worked — at one time or another — in every- 
thing from the leaf department in Kentucky to the sales department, 
where for two-and-a-half years he travelled in major markets and the 
backwoods of the country. In 1927, Peterson became assistant sales 
manager; in 1929, a v.p. and director: in 1937. an executive v. p.; 
and in 1946. president. 

U.S.T. started in radio in November 1933 with the Half -Hour 
For Men show, featuring "Pick & Pat." After that, until 1944, there 
was a series of nighttime variety musical shows, which did a fairly 
good job of helping Peterson build sales. In 1944. Peterson and 
U.S.T. discovered that while they were getting good ratings, the 
air audience was mostly women. 

Alarmed, U.S.T. dropped out of radio, except for selective an- 
nouncement campaigns in the South, until the right selling formula 
could come along. In 1948. it came. Peterson bought a quiz show. 
Take A Number, on Mutual, at the urging of the Kudner \genc\. 
and slotted it at a time when male listening was high, with good 
results. Toda\. I .S.T. is spending the bulk of a $1,000,000 ad 
budget to sponsoi its latest male-appeal effort, Martin Kane — Private 
Eye in both radio and TV. 

* Seen, riglit. with air sleuth William Gargan. 



10 



SPONSOR 




ECONOMICAL 
COMPLETE COVERAGE 

of the 

TOP TWO MARKETS 

on the 

PACIFIC COAST 



TO SELL the TOP TWO markets on 
the Pacific Coast-the biggest mar- 
kets West of Chicago-choose KHJ 
and KFRC, key stations of the 
Mutual-Don Lee Network. 

KHJ and KFRC have over a quar- 
ter of a century of experience in 
selling products and services to the 
Pacific Coast's two major markets. 
Put them to work selling for you! 

TO SELL the whole big Pacific 
Coast, your best radio buy is 
Mutual-Don Lee, the only net- 
work with a station in every one of 
the forty-five important markets. 

Ytlicn you icant the top two 
markets on the Pacific Coast, con- 
centrate on the two key stations of the 
World's Greatest Regional Network. 



KHJ 

LOS ANGELES 



KFRC 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Nationally represented by 
JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



DON LEE 



BROADCASTING SYSTEM 




29 AUGUST 1949 



Radio is 

TODAY'S 
BEST BUY 

. . and in Washington 

the best bu y is I 

WWDC 



Keep your eye on the ball! Just 
measure the total audience of 
any advertising medium, and 
you'll realize that the most 
effective, economical way to 
reach the millions is still radio. 
You can't get today's results 
on tomorrow's ideas! 

More and more national adver- 
tisers are turning to independ- 
ent radio stations. In Washing- 
ton, they're buying WWDC — 
the big, dominant independent. 
Get all the facts from your 
Forjoe man. 



\fw dvvvlopmvnts on SPO\SOR stories 



> 
» 



iff! 

TODAY'S BUY! 

One Spot Daily, Tony Wakeman's 

ALL SPORTS PARADE 
As low as $66 weekly 

WWDC 

AM-FM-The D.C. Independent 

Represented Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



p.s. 



See: "Employees must be sold too" and P.S. 
ISSIieS: August 1947, p. 31; August 1948. p. 12 
Subject: Radio's role in employee relations. 



In Detroit recently, where feeling ran high as a result of a "yes" 
-trike vote of the Ford Motor Company's hourly paid workers, radio 
featured importanth in a verhal fencing match between Ford and the 
I .A.W. Prior to the actual voting, both the companj and the union 
went on the air to tell their respective stories to workers and to 
workers' families. Ford bought time on four Detroit stations with 
an announcement schedule that urged the workers to vote "no" on 
the ballot. Ford's pitch, in its essence, was that the big auto firm 
wanted ''to keep the greatest possible number of people at work at 
present high rates" rather than "a much smaller number at higher 
rates." Snapped peppery Walter P. Keuther. president of the big 
U.A.W.. on the union's own \\ DET-FM: "Ford wants to return to its 
pre-union practice of working the life out of an employee and then 
tossing him out of the gate. Ford is trying to sell the workers a bill 
of goods . . ." 

I he air campaign, plus heavy newspaper ads by both parties, 
continued all the way down to the finish line. On 8 August the 
voting began. In the final tabulation, the union, which has been 
pressing for a $10()-a-month pension plan, a compan) -financed 
medical program, and a general cost-of-living wage increase, won 
out. A majority of the workers voted to go out — if and when a 
strike is called. 

Radio, incidentally, figures in Ford's national advertising plans. 
Although the firm has announced that it will swear off radio in favor 
of TV this fall, at least one network radio program stands a good 
chance of being included in the 1950 budget. 



p.s 



See: "La Rosa follows the Skippy pattern" 

IsSUe: 14 March 1949; p. 26 

Subject: "Hollywood Theatre of Stars" sets mail 
pull record for WOR and La Rosa 



As a climax to 26 weeks of airing under the sponsorship of V. La Rosa 
& Sons, macaroni products manufacturer, the La Rosa Hollynood 
Theatre of Stars established what is claimed to be a new mail-pull 
record for Mutual's key New York station. WOR. Before going off 
the air for the summer. La Rosa drew 10.143 requests for a recipe 
booklet after only five announcements during the last few of the 
130 30 -minute, five-times -a-week daytime shows. 

La Rosa expects to return to sponsorship of Hollywood Theatre 
of Stars on 3 October for another 26-week cycle. The program is 
an open-end syndicated transcription series, produced and mc'd 
b\ ('. P. VlacGregor in Hollywood, and is available to sponsors in 
different markets and areas. 

Last year's sponsorship of Hollywood Theatre by La Rosa (over 
six Eastern stations, in addition to WOK i marked the company's 
first excursion into English-speaking radio since 1037. when it pre- 
sented a series of operatic concerts on a Mutual split network of 22 
stations over a 26-week period, repeating the formula for the nexl 
two m;iis. The lion's share of La Rosas broadcast advertising has 
gone into Italian-language programs, which have carried the firm s 
spaghetti sales messages over WOV, New 'l ork, and other Eastern- 
seaboard outlets continuously for 10 years. 



SPONSOR 



"A Job Well done * 



c I 



c I 



A T I 



'dRiEr? AwAnu 

for 

NEWS COVERAGE LEADERSHIP/ 

1948-1949 

Quotation from VARIETY July 27 

"WCPO has not lost its news coverage 



leadership in the last 12 years. Nor, 
you can be sure, has it lost its audience, 
or the respect and continued inquiries 
fronl — ♦hes itations w hj>— -wtlnt to do 
likewise." 



Affiliated with the 
CINCINNATI POST 




A Scripps-Howard 
Radio Station 



WCPO-TV NOW TELECASTING 11 HOURS DAILY— CHANNEL 7! 



29 AUGUST 1949 



_ 



Don't do anything until you 



hear the NEW Lang-Worth 



Transcribed Music Library... 



a revolutionary develop- 
ment in sound reproduction. 



US* 1 1 1 &£3lPv<Sj! I 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
SOON 



LANG-WORTH 

FEATURE P R G R A M S , I n c 



113 W. 57th STREET, NEW YORK 19, N.Y 

Network Calibre Programs 
at Cocal Station Cost 



40 West 52nd 



(Continued from page 6) 

sou can in the way of statistics and 1 11 
build the announcement series, and 
well get on the bandwagon. 

Robert R. Tincher 
V.p, General Manager 
WNAX, Yankton, S. D. 



Reference is made to your promotion 
piece entitled "An open letter to Bill 
Rine, WWVA.' 

I am in the process of selling a 
program to a sponsor who will devote 
the program exclusively to selling the 
advantages of free enterprise and the 
American way of Life. 

It occurs to me that the "U. S. 
statistics for use in 'Let's sell optim- 
ism' " could be used in providing the 
continuity for this program. 

I would be grateful if you would 
forward me these statistics unless you 
feel they would be of no value for 
the aforementioned program. 

John Cleghorn 
General Manager 
WRBC, Jackson, Miss. 



We are 100 f r behind your "Let's 
sell optimism" idea. In order that we 
may do a complete job of promotion, 
would you please send us 15 additional 
copies of your prospectus, plus full 
statistics. 

Gerry Cohen 

WLOL 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



We have received your pamphlet 
entitled "An open letter to Bill Rine. 
WWVA." and are greatly interested 
in helping your "Let's sell optimism" 
campaign along. 

We need the U. S. statistics you 
offered, so will you please send them 
along so we can get an "optimism' 
campaign rolling in Baltimore. 

Any other suggestions or informa- 
tion you have available would be great- 
ly appreciated. 

Marilee C. Considine 

Program Manager 

1/ /'/'//. Baltimore, Md. 



If there is a better way for radio 
to do a public service job than by put- 
ting your "Let's sell optimism" idea 
into effect, I can't think of it at the 



14 



SPONSOR 



moment. 

WABY intends to go to work on it 

immediately, and to that end will 

appreciate any statistical or other 

material you can furnish. 

Russell B. Wilde 
General Manager 
WABY, Albany, N. Y. 



As offered in your "open letter to 
Bill Rine." would you please send the 
statistics for use in a "Let's sell optim- 
ism" series here? 

Elliot Wager 
KLZ 
Denver, Colo. 



I want you to know that I enjoyed 
reading your "open letter to Bill Rine, 
and all other Station Managers." 

I think your Les Blumenthal has 
a fine idea, and if you have a lot of 
statistics that you can supply to help 
us "sell optimism," shoot them on to 
us and we will begin to put that kind 
of activity into force in this section of 
Illinois. 

I think you are doing something 

very excellent here and that you 

deserve a pat on the back for the idea. 

I'm equally sure that such fellows as 

Hugh Halff, Martin Campbell, and 

Harold Hough sensed the opportunity 

to do the same thing that I feel can be 

accomplished in this market, and that 

they will spark the idea down in Texas. 

Fred C. Mueller 

General Manager 

WEEK, Peoria, III. 



DALLAS TV 

Article on Sunset's TV advertising 
rang bell with us here ... do you 
have about 100 reprints of same you 
could rush us airmail? If not, could 
we have your permission to reproduce 
the story here . . . giving full credit to 
sponsor, of course? 

For the past couple of months we 
have been working a distributor and 
dealer-wide promotion campaign to 
sell TV sets, and we believe we'll have 
some figures for you in a few weeks. 
Television is taking hold well here in 
Dallas . . . KBTV goes on the air about 
1 September . . . KBLD-TV a month 
or so later. 

Meanwhile, I'd appreciate hearing 
from you as soon as possible regard- 
ing the reprints; we can use them to 
great advantage. 

Kendall Baker 
Bozell & Jacobs 
Dallas, Tex. 



CCD"LEa?0JKCI »QQ! 

WITH RADIO'S No. 1 F00TBALI SHOW 





•PREDICTIONS 
•HEADLINE NEWS 
•FEATURE STORIES 
•DIG NAME GUESTS 
WiiU 

COACH FRANK LEAHY 

Head Coach at the University of Notre Dame 

Transcribed for Local or Regional Sponsorship — 15 minutes, 
once a week for 13 weeks during the football season beginning the 
week of September 18 and carrying through the week of December 11. 
Recorded weekly following Saturdays big games, and expressed for 
Thursday or Friday broadcasting, the next week. 

Promotional Features — This season's program includes new pro- 
motional features such as photographs, newspaper mats, feature and 
publicity stories and other merchandising and sales help to assure 
the success of "Leahy of Notre Dame." 

Scoop Your Market and Hold The Sports Audience with 
"Leahy of Notre Dame" — Football is just around the corner. 
Beat the rush by requesting full information today. 

WRITE . . .WIRE . . . PHONE 

For Prices and Information 

GREEN ASSOCIATES 

PHONE— CEntral 6-5593 
360 N. MICHIGAN BLVD. • • CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS 



29 AUGUST 1949 



15 



KFH IS TOPS 




TOP DAYTIME 
HOOPERATINGS 

IN CITY OF WICHITA 

WINTER-SPRING REPORT 

DECEMBER '48 THROUGH APRIL 49 



8:45 A.M. 

10:00 A.M. 

9:45 A.M. 

12.15 P.M. 



Program 



NEWS 

NEWS 

GODFREY 

BREAKFAST CLUB 

GODFREY 

GODFREY 

CHOW TIME 



Rating 



13.9 
12.5 
12.4 
12.1 
12.0 
11.9 
11.3 



Outlet 



KFH 
KFH 
KFH 
ABC 
KFH 
KFH 
KFH 



Here is an opportunity for some aggressive adver- 
tiser to step into the #2 radio spot in Wichita with 
the noon-time news over KFH. It won't be sus- 
taining long, so if you are interested, you will be 
wise to call the nearest Petry man right NOW. 



Our congratulations go to Studebaker 
and Peter Paul Inc. for sponsoring the 
TOP rated daytime show in Wichita — 
the 5:45 p.m. News over KFH. 



5000 Watts - ALL the time 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



WICHITA, KANSAS 



16 



SPONSOR 



29 ACGl'ST 1949 




New ami renew 



THESE REPORTS APPEAR IN ALTERNATE ISSUES 



hESIF 



New on Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Animal Foundation Inc 

Blatz Brewing Co 

Coca-Cola Co 

Illinois Watch Co (Elgin 

American Co div) 
International Harvester Co 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 
Smith Bros 

U. S. Tobacco Co 



Comstock, Dulles 




CBS 


62 


Kastor, Farrell, 


Chesley & 


NBC 


163 


Clifford 








D'Arcy 




CBS 


171 


Weiss & Geller 




CBS 


149 


McCann-Erickson 




NBC 


165 


Newell-Emmett 




CBS 


172 


Sullivan, Stauffer 


, Colwell 


ABC 


187 


& Bayles 








Kudner 




MBS 


380 



Allan Jackson & the News; Sun 11-11:05 am;Sep 11; 

39 wks 
Th 9:30-10 pm; Sep 15; 52 wks 

Charlie McCarthy; Sun 8-8:30 pm; 52 wks 
Groucho Marx; Wed 9-9:30 pm; Oct 5; 52 wks 

Harvest of Stars; Sun 5:30-6 pm; Sep 25; 52 wks 
Bing Crosby; Wed 9:30-10 pm; Sep 21; 52 wks 
Stop the Music; Sun 8:15-8:30 pm; Sep 18; 52 wks 

Martin Kane Private Eye; Sun 4:30-5 pm; Aug 7; 52 wks 




vQ Renewals on Networks 






SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Allis-Chalmers Mfg Co 

Champion Spark Plug Co 
Christian Science Monitor 

Hall Bros Inc 
Philco Corp 
Skelly Oil Co 

Wander Co 



Bert S. Gittins NBC J6i 

MacManus, John & Adams ABC 237 

H. B. Humphrey ABC 75 

Foote, Cone & Belding CBS 158 

Hutchins ABC 271 

Henri, Hurst & McDonald NBC 25 

Hill-Blackett MBS 518 



National Farm & Home Hour; Sat 1-1:30 pm; Sep 10; 

52 wks 
Champion Roll Call; Fri 9:55-10 pm; Sep 30; 52 wks 
Christian Science Monitor Views the News; Tu 9:30- 

9:45 pm; Aug 30; 52 wks 
Hallmark Playhouse; Th 10-10:30 pm; Sep 8; 52 wks 
Breakfast Club; M-F 9:45-10 am; Aug 29; 52 wks 
Alex Dreier; M-F 8-8:15 am; Sep 5; 52 wks 
This Farming Business; Sat 8-8:15 am; Sep 5; 52 wks 
Captain Midnight; TuTh 5:30-6 pm; Sep 20; 52 wks 



Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



James S. Austin 
C. I. Bagg 
Fred J. Board 

Cleve W. Carey 
Arch T. Carithers 
A. B. Collier 
W. E. Fish 

Gordon Gent 

O. H. Greenfield 

F. L. Hart 

J. H. Herlocker 

Bernard O. Holsinger 

William King Jr 

H. W. Maier Jr 

John K. McDonougli 
Thomas M. Morton 
E. L. Reibold 
Leon Soudant 

Robert E. Thompson 
William B. Tower Jr 

John A. Underwood 
Norman K. Van Derzee 



John Morrell & Co, Ottumwa la., asst to sis dir 
Newell-Emmett, N. Y., acct exec 
Standard Brands, N. Y., ajst prod mgr of Chase 
& Sanborn Coffee, Tender Leaf Tea 

Rexall Drug Co, L. A., gen sis mgr 
John Morrell & Co, Ottumwa la., sis dir 
General Motors Corp (Chevrolet motor div), 
Detroit, asst gen sis mgr 



International Milling Co, Mnpls., gen sis mgr 

International Milling Co, Mnpls., adv mgr 
International Milling Co, Greenville Tex., adv, sis 

prom mgr 
Sylvania Electric Products Inc, N. Y. 

Cluett, Peabody & Co Inc, Chi., sis prom mgr 
Nestle Co Inc, N. Y., sis prom mgr 

International Milling Co, Mnpls., asst adv mgr 
Illinois Watch Case Co (Elgin-American div), 
N. Y., eastern sis mgr 



Same, sis mgr 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc, N. Y., sis mgr 

Borden Co, N. Y., adv mgr for Borden's Starlac 

Rexall Drug Co, L. A., adv mgr 

Same, Rexall div dir 

Same, vp 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Bowey's Inc, N. Y., sis prom mgr 

Adam Scheidt Brewing Co, Norristown Pa., gen sis mgr 

Dean Milk Co, Chi., vp in chge sis, mdsg 

Same, Kansas City, gen sis mgr 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc, N. Y., sis prom mgr 

Same, gen sis ingr 

Same, Mnpls., adv mgr 

Same, sis dir 

Adam Scheidt Brewing Co, Norristown Pa., adv mgr 

Same, regional sis dir 

Borden Co, N. Y., Borden's Instant Coffee, Instant Mix 

Hot Chocolate adv mgr 

Same, Kansas City, adv mgr 

Same, Elgin 111., sis mgr 

Borg-Warner Corp (Norge div), Detroit, vp in chge sis 
Hudson Motor Car Co, Detroit, vp in chge sis 



• In next issue: Xew National Selective Business: New and Renewed on Tele- 
vision; Station Representation Changes; AdM'ertising Agency Personnel CBtanges 



National Broadcast Sales Executives (Personnel changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



John 11. llachcm 

George M. Bens..n 
G. I. Berrj 

Hum .mi It. Burkham 

Keith s. Chase 
Kd Dennii 

Hi i in. in E. last 
l(r\ (,.l\ Jr 

James Hyde 
William M. Koblenzer 
( ;u mil Marts 
Richard s. Nickeson 

I i m-st I'. Oliver 
Gordon Reid 
George Whitney 



CBS, N. Y. 

MBS, N. V. eastern sis mgr 

ABC, central di\ sis mur 



Willi, Kansas • ity Mo., sis rep 
WKRC, Cinci., mgr 
Transradio Press Service 
Consumer's Aid, Chi., vp, gen mgr 



WklHV, Madison Wis., continuity dir 
WKNV, Klmira N. V., rumml mgr 
CKNW, New Westminster B. C, prodn mgr 
Harrington, Whitney & Hurst, L. A., partner 



DuMont, N. Y., time, pgm sis dept 

Same, nat'l sis mgr 

DuMont, midwestern div sis mgr 

MBS, N. Y. div sis mgr 

(FPL, London, Ont., sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Joseph Hershey McGillvra, Chi., midwest sis office mgr 

Storecast Corp of America, Chi., western sis, adv mgr 

DuMont, N. Y., time, pgm sis dept 

MBS, Chi., div sis mgr 

W1SC, Madison Wis., sis mgr 

WKSB, WESB-FM, Bradford Pa., gen sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Don Lee Broadcasting System, H'wood., gen sis mgr 



New Agency Appointments 



a; 



■ 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Adam Hat Stores Inc. N. Y. 
Admiral Corp, N. Y. 

Ansley Radio & Television Inc, Trenton N. J. 

V. Arena & Sons Inc, Norristown Pa. 

Automotive Trade Association, Wash. 

Beech-Nut Packing Co, Canajoharie N. Y. 

Bell & Howell Co, Chi. 

Bib Corp, Lakeland Fla. 

Canadian Doughnut Co Ltd, Toronto 

Dana Perfumes Inc, Chi. 

Dearborn Supply Co, (hi. 

Foremost Dairies Inc, Jacksonville Fla. 

General Electric Supply Corp, Kansas City Mo. 

Glaze-AU Corp, Chi. 

Golden Gate Scenic Steamship Lines, S. F. 

Gold Medal Candy Corp, N. Y. 

Grace Bros Brewing Co, Santa Rosa Calif. 

Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island 

Stewart Hartshorn Co, N. Y. 

Helbros Watch Co, N. Y. 

Henderson Furnace & Mfg Co, Scbastopol Calif. 

Home Builders Association, Wash. 

Honey-Butter Products Corp, Ithaca N. Y. 

Jewish Agency for Palestine, N. Y. 

Lever Bros Co, Cambridge Mass. 



Marcor Inc, Chi. 

Minnesota Macroni Co Inc, St. Paul 

National Association of Variety Stores Chi. 

National Bargain Buyers Club of America Inc, 
L. A. 

National Benefit Insurance Co, Des Moines 

Oak Itidge Antennas, N. Y. 

Peerless Fountain Pen & Pencil Co Inc, N. Y. 

Kichel Distributors Inc, Phila. 

Rulo Products, Chi. 

San Francisco Hotel Association, S. F. 

Santa Fe Vintage Co, L. A. . 

A. Sartorius & Co Inc, N. Y. 

Skaggs Products Inc, L. A. 

Standard Brands Inc, N. Y. 

Stokcly-Van Camp, Indianapolis 

Stuart Clothes, N. Y. 

S. B. Thomas Inc, N. Y. 

Western Stove Co, Culver City Calif. 

Wyler iV Co, Chi. 



Men's hats 

Radios, TV sets, appliances 

Radios, TV sets 

Contc Luna macaroni, spaghetti prods 

Institutional 

Food prods 

Photo equipment 

Orange juice for infants 

Downy-flake Baking Mixes 

Perfumes 

Wax, astringent cream 

Dairy prods 

Appliances 

Automotive polishes 

Bay cruises 

Candy 

Beer 

Hotel 

Window shades 

Watches 

Clipper forced-air gas furnaces 

Home Show Exposition 

Honey, butter spread 

Surf 
Surf 

Swan Soap 

Plastic food saver bags 

Macaroni prods 

Association 

Mdsg, distributing organization 

Insurance 

Antennas 

Pens, pencils 

Cosmetics 

Reducing plan 

Hotels 

Wines 

Cosmetics 

Cookie "mix 

Chase & Sanborn Coffee, Instant 
Chase & Sanborn 

Food prods 

Clothing 

Specialty bakery prods 

Stoves 
Food prods 



Willian H. Weintraub, N. Y. 

Kudner, N. Y., for radio, pub rel, in addi- 
tion to current TV 

Frederick-Clinton, N. Y. 

St. Georges & Keyes, Balto. 

Kal, Ehrlich & Merrick, Wash. 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, N. Y. 

McCann-Erickson, N. Y. 

Borland, N. Y. 

Harold F. Stanfield, Toronto 

C. C Fogarty, Chi. 

Tim Morrow, Chi. 

Fletcher D. Richards, N. Y. 

W. D. Lyons, Cedar Rapids la. 

Deuss-Gordon, Chi. 

Beaumont & Hohman, S. F. 

Donahue & Coe, N. Y. 

Conley, Baltzer, Pettier & Steward, S. F. 

Beaumont & Hohman, Detroit 

Paul Smith, N. Y. 

Dorland, N. Y. 

Knollin, S. F. 

Kal, Ehrlich & Merrick, Wash. 

Moser & Cotins, Utica N. Y. 

Prudential, N. Y. 

N. W. Ayer, N. Y. 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y., for Canadian 

adv 
BBD&O, N. Y. 
Louis A. Smith, Chi. 
O. David, St. Paul 
Tim Morrow, Chi. 
Davis-Harrison-Simmonds, H'wood. 

Cole's, Des Moines 

H. W. Hauptman, N. Y. 

Chernnw, N. Y. 

Lee Ramsdell, Phila. 

Tim Morrow, Chi. 

Beaumont & Hohman, S. F. 

Lockwood-Shackelford, L. A. 

Reiss, N. Y. 

Barton A. Stebbins, L. A. 

t .. nipt. in. N. Y. 

Gardner, St. L. 
Frederick-Clinton, N. Y. 
John Stanton, N. Y. 
Agency Associates, L. A. 
Barle Ludgin, Chi. 



. 



BIG 



THINGS HAPPEN 



• • 




IN THE WWVA AREA 



As big things happen in industry in the WWVA 
area, so do big things happen for WWVA adver- 
tisers. For the WWVA 50, 000- watt voice reaches 
into more than two million radio homes, covering 
eight and one-half million people . . . people who 
produce more than half the nation's coal, more 
than half the nation's steel in Eastern Ohio, Western 
Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. 



They welcome WWVA's friendly local programs 
and top-flight CBS shows into their homes. Proof 
that they listen: Attendance at personal appear- 
ances of WWVA artists. Proof that they buy: 
Station mail of more than one thousand pieces a 
day. WWVA can help you sell your product in a 
big way in a big market. Consult your nearest 
Edward Petry Man today for Fall availabilities. 




50,000 WATTS --CBS •• WHEELING, W. VA. 
NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO. 

National Sales Headquarters: 527 Lexington Ave., New York City 



29 AUGUST 1949 



19 



an open letter to 
Bill Rine, WWVA... 






'«;: 



* lA*S SELL OPTIMISM 
subject; LCTS 

.,1 optimist ***• *° 

^rector, -*»**5uW » t0 * * „ BeD a e Hugb «» lff ' "^ 

an d Dallas before ^ spar* l^sUrable W ' et - 

He -Us - **£ HO^ • » *" " "^ 

Cabell and flare ^ ^ ftir . ^ 

individually; , E£% tth *!• • U * 1 " , ^tjbe^uiines^ 

le t-s sell opU ^.aaMSBStJ^ifeTS*^^ 



l - tTtbT^ent^he W^ ^. »s ^ , do „ lna nt 

ejidfears...^" abou t radio sp 
ISSS^S-^. ,„ . series or a^-en^ 

£al -2~ * Xrtrade'pubHcatlons can >^ of 

£*-" •«£*£& P r rtanUal^ s f ° r «* 
supply e tatl !riTiso and substantial 
reason for "J***"^ business, 
fello* * ho tlgM , . t theconsuaer 

l seHe,^**^^ 
2 - ^^^v^feT^ies are ava mer of wx ^ 






What 
at 



acting — anD ^ appreciation 

w ia eet behl^ an aggr 
of stations shou** g ever7 «here. 

uv . -,. ~ -•• -^ - -. - - — 

M*h This i /? 

♦ *ves are hign. // 

The stages ^ / / 



ary R Glenn/abs 
tforman *• 



President . 0HS Inc . 

SPONSOR POBUCaii 



"Let's sej-- 1 - "r 
. „ s stages for -J&fS- on *-*"*• 



# .«and all other 
station managers 



"■H 



Every day is Labor Day for Jamison . . . 

. . . and he loves it. 



According to our man Jamison, a good radio and television representative 
is a fellow who makes things easier, more efficient and more 
profitable tor other people. And, of course, the types of other people 
he is particularly interested in are: 

1 ) broadcast ad\ertisers . . . and 
2 ) broadcasting stations. 

"We representatives," he often says, "are in business for just one thing 
. . .TO GIVE SERVICE. National Spot Broadcasting is an 
exceedingly complex medium., .often involving hundreds of different 
stations, each on a separate contract. Few advertisers, and even 
fewer stations, are equipped to make all their own arrangements. But 
firms like Weed and Company, with offices in every major time 
buying center across the nation, are in a position to render a 
unique and valuable two-way service. 

"Performing this service expertly requires hard work and plenty of 

it . . . which undoubtedly accounts for 
my own personal success, as well 
as the outstanding position of 
Weed and Company in the field." 




Weed 




radio and television 
station representatives 



a n 



a 



new y o r k 

company san f r 



a n c i s c o 



boston • Chicago 
• atlanta • 



• d e t r o i t 
holly wood 



22 



SPONSOR 




JEAN HERSHOLT AS "DR. CHRISTIAN" MEETS ANOTHER OF THE LOCAL CRISES HE HAS CONFRONTED WEEKLY FOR 12 YEARS. 



Chesebrough and 

the common touch 



21 years of human-interest 
radio have kept Vaseline 



sales eliiiihing 



i\i% •}''■'■ 



Year after year, the broad- 
cast advertising activities 
of the Chesebrough Manu- 
facturing Company, maker of Vase- 
line hair tonics, lip ice, petroleum 
jelly, and toiletries, go virtually un- 
noticed. It is a case, more than any- 
thing else, of an advertising approach 
that becomes unobtrusive due to its 
simplicity and consistency. Chese- 
brough's radio advertising is not 
flashy. It is not high-powered. It is 

29 AUGUST 1949 



not spectacular . . . except in the re- 
sults it brings to this 69-year-old firm. 
Despite razzle-dazzle radio and TV 
promotions by other manufacturers of 
hair tonics and hair dressings, Vase- 
line continues to be the number one 
hair tonic on most national brand-pre- 
ference surveys, and slips to number 
two in only a few markets. For ex- 
ample, the American Magazine Market 
Guide shows Vaseline brand tonic 
leading nationally last year with 23.3% 



of the men naming it as their favorite 
brand. (Wildroot was second with 
21.5%; Vitalis third with 14.2%). 
Vaseline Petroleum Jelly, used as a 
first aid for burns and skin irritations, 
is now so far the leader in its field 
that Chesebrough has been worried at 
times about the danger of the word 
"Vaseline" becoming a generic word 
for petroleum jellies. 

It comes as a surprise to not a few 
advertising men to see results like 



23 




YESTERDAY: VASELINE PACKAGES REFLECTED THE PROGRAM WHEN CHESEBROUGH STARTED IN RADIO WITH "REAL FOLKS" IN 1928. 



this achieved without enormous media 
expenditures and high-pressure selling. 
On the other hand, those familiar with 
broadcast advertising's ability to de- 
liver continuing product sales, when 
its use is based on creative intuition 
and advertising research, know that 
Chesebrough's success is merely a mat- 
ter of sticking with a good thing, im- 
proving it gradually, and maintaining 
a consistent merchandising and adver- 
tising approach. The close and pleasant 
relationship between Chesebrough and 
its advertising agency, McCann-Erick- 
son, has played a large part in the 
steady upward growth of its radio 
ratings and the corollary upward trend 
in Chesebrough sales. 

Chesebrough's advertising approach, 
at the same time, is not merely a 
glorification of the past. Both client 
and agency have had, through the 
years, the foresight to realize that what 
sold Vaseline products in, say, 1939 
is not necessarily what is going to sell 
them today. Just as the various Vase- 
line product packages have been 
streamlined to meet the needs of cur- 
rent marketing trends, so has the radio 
gradually been modernized and 
changed (example: Chesebrough's ra- 
dio advertising in foreign countries) 
to meet a specific need. No capsule 
description of its air advertising fits 
as well as the old French proverb 
which freely translated runs: "The 
iim .it- a thing changes, the more it is 
the same." 



Chesebrough came to broadcast ad- 
vertising in the first week of August 
1 928. It was the year when Hoover 
defeated Al Smith. The Graf Zeppelin 
had flown the Atlantic and had hovered 
over New York Harbor while the 
whistles blew. Admiral Byrd was in 
the midst of plans to fly to the South 
Pole, and Einstein was working on a 
new theory of relativity. It was a good 
year for Chesebrough. which expected 
to have a net income of more than 
$1,500,000 and a healthy sales curve 
for its well-established products. In 
those boom days of cloche hats, low- 
slung waistlines, and bathtub gin. 
Chesebrough felt that it was in a 
strong enough position to experiment 
with the newest advertising medium — 
radio. Accordingly, on the recommend- 
ation of McCann-Erickson. Chese- 
brough's first radio program. Real 
Folks, went out to listeners on the old 
NBC-Blue network. The show, heard 
on Mondays 9:30-10:00 p.m. on an 
11-station network, was one of radio's 
first "family appeal'' dramas. It dealt 
with the doings of a family group and 
its friends in a typical small American 
town. and. more or less by accident, 
stumbled on one of the basic radio 
formulas — the soap opera. George 
Frame Brown, a familiar name to ra- 
dio old-timers, headed the cast which 
included Ed Whitnev. Elsie Mae Gor- 
don. Phoebe Mackay, and Tom Brown. 
While not strictly speaking a serial 
-how. it had running characters with 



many of the over-simplified values and 
characteristics that mark the "daytime 
soaper" even today. Before Chese- 
brough bought it. Real Folks had had 
a trial run on NBC-Blue as a sustainer. 
with a heavy mail pull. 

Real Folks dispensed a brand of 
folksy humor and cracker-barrel phil- 
osophy, combined with simple, everv- 
day problems and their happy solu- 
tions, that worked well for Chesebrough 
almost from the beginning. The com- 
mercials were, as most commercials 
were in 1928. mostly adaptations of 
copy used in newspapers and maga- 
zines, but even they worked well, and 
definite sales increases were noticed 
after a few weeks. Chesebrough sales- 
men (actually, Chesebrough sales are 
handled entirely by Colgate-Palmolive- 
Peet in this country under a deal that 
is as old as Chesebrough I were en- 
thusiastic about the new radio adver- 
tising. The station list was upped from 
11 stations to 41. after the first year 
or so. and the billing figures took a 
corresponding leap from $44,000 to 
an almost unheard-of $234,000. Talent 
costs ran around S1000-S1500 a week 
for the show, which was primarily a 
George Brown package. 

The Real Folks show ran for more 
than three years for Chesebrough until 
the end of December 1931. During 
that time, it became apparent to both 
client and agencv that the) had hit 
upon what might well be the ideal 
radio approach for Chesebrough. It 



24 



SPONSOR 




ODAY: ALONG WITH MODERN PACKAGING, CHESEBROUGH'S 1949 AIR-SELLING PROGRAM INCLUDES TV SPONSORSHIP OF ROLLER DERBY. 



was simple, human, everyday. It was 
an unsophisticated approach that gave 
rise to its own dramatic laws. Real 
Folks, to veteran playgoers and big- 
city dwellers, was "corny." But it 
clicked with out-of-town audiences and . 
the rural areas, since the stories were 
simple and understandable. Rather 
than wit. Real Folks dispensed humor. 
Rather than sarcasm. Real Folks gave 
forth morality. Rather than exotic sit- 
uations, Real Folks got down to the 
level of ordinary human problems. 
Here, if anywhere, is the secret of 
Chesebrough's radio success, for this 
approach has been the keynote of its 
radio ever since. 

Chesebrough dropped Real Folks at 
the end of 1931, in an argument over 
talent costs. With the lessons of Real 
Folks in mind, McCann-Erickson's ra- 
dio director, Dorothy Barstow (now 
Mrs. Dorothy B. McCann) put to- 
gether a show called Friendship Town 
which went on the NBC-Blue air on 1 
January 1932, in a Friday night 9-10 
p.m. spot. Friendship Town went after 
the same type of audience that had 
formed a habit of listening to Real 
Folks. The program featured Virginia 
Gardner, Don Carney (later radio's 
"Uncle Don"), Ed Whitney (of the 
Real Folks cast). Frank Luther. Pick 
& Pat. and Maria Cardinale. As far as 
the story content was concerned. 
Friendship Toivn followed the same 
lines as the show that preceded it. 

Again, the show pulled, and did a 

29 AUGUST 1949 



good job saleswise for Chesebrough 
products. However, the depression had 
hit the nation, and Chesebrough 's net 
income figures for 1932 were about 
half what they had been in 1928. Cost- 
cutting was the order of the day. and 
radio was one of the casualties. At the 
close of 1932, after a years run for 
Chesebrough. Friendship Town ( it had 
become a Wednesday-night half-hour 
show by that time ) went off the air. 

The company reduced its entire ad- 
vertising during the next five years, 
and went out of radio completely. The 
memory of what radio had done for 
the sales figures, however, remained. 

In 1937, when net income figures 
had climbed back from the 1934 low 
ebb of $614,671 to more than $800,000. 
the company felt it was time to go 
back to air-selling. This time, the 
agency and its radio department built 
their show carefully from scratch. It 
had been decided in advance that the 
show was to have the same basic appeal 
as shows like Real Folks and Friend- 
ship Town. With this broad outline in 
mind. McCann-Erickson in New York 
started keeping a sharp eye open for 
the right star and vehicle to come 
along. 

Across the country on a Hollywood 
sound stage, meanwhile, a Danish- 
born actor named Jean Hersholt had 
been working in a film called Country 
Doctor. A soft-spoken lover of home 
and fireside, of pipe and books, Jean 
Hersholt had been a "natural for the 



part. In 1936, the movie had been 
released, and had been a hit. A Holly- 
wood columnist, noted at that time for 
pressuring famous star names to ap- 
pear gratis on a radio show the col- 
umnist ran as a side-line, had asked 
Hersholt to do a scene from Country 
Doctor on the air. Hersholt had done 
so, and the mail response had been 
tremendous. A shrewd business head 
as well as a good actor. Hersholt had 
suggested to his agent that he have a 
radio script written around the type of 
character he had portrayed. This had 
been done, and the script, in 1937. 
was making the round of the agencies. 
One day, it landed on the desk of 
Dorothy McCann, and it was love at 
first sight. 

Hersholt was quickly offered $1000 
a week to play the part on the air. He 
wired back that he would do it. and 
then found he had to pay 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox some $300 a week to get a 
radio release on his contract. This ar- 
ranged, on 7 November 1937 Chese- 
brough returned to broadcast adver- 
tising with a show that it has spon- 
sored without a break ever since. That 
show is Dr. Christian. 

From the beginning, the show was 
just what Chesebrough wanted. The 
character of the kindly country physic- 
ian and his pretty nurse, Judy Price, 
lent itself to the kind of "dignified 
under-selling" of Chesebrough prod- 
ucts that had proved itself in previous 
(Please turn to page 40) 



25 




This report analyzes reasons why, 
according to many timebu/ers, 
City Hooperatings fall down . . . 



(lit\ Hooperatings are. at 
best, straws in the w ind. \t 
worst, they're the straws 
that break the back of intelligent time- 
buyers. Disregarding entirely the 
capabilities of housewives who. in 
two-hour shifts, make the Hooper tele- 
phone coincidental surve\s. the re- 
sulting figures can be onlj at the best 
indicative and frequently are down- 
right misleading. 

It's eas\ In bu\ time by using City 
Hooperatings -easy to buy time and 
get the leasl for an advertiser's money. 
C. E. Hooper himself stresses the 
limitations of most of his reports, ex- 
cept U. S. Hooperatings. All his other 
reports are based upon telephone in- 
terviewing, 13 attempted calls in each 
I ■"> minutes. In many of Hooper's Cit\ 
report areas I 100 cities) only one in- 
terviewer is working at any one time. 
Big cities, of course, have more than 
one unit working at a time, but the 
"big" cities represent only a small 
fraction of those for which Hooper re- 
leases City Reports. 

Since Hooper feels, as do other re- 
searchers, that a minimum of 400 in- 
terviews is vital before a "'rating" for 
a program or time period can be held 
to be "publishable." City Hooperatings 
are published in most cities three times 
a year, usually for five-month periods. 
\ Monday-through-Friday daytime rat- 
ing for a five-month period is based 
upon telephone calls made five da\s a 
month, or 2."> days during a five-month 
period. In a one-interviewer town 
(realh two interviewers working in 
shifts) this means 16 calls per 15- 
minute period if the 400 minimum is 
to he attained. 

To achieve a station-program or 
time-period rating of 10 for a five-daj 
period, only eight homes would have 
to report listening during that period 
or to that daytime strip, during a sur- 
\c\cd week. It is possible that a com- 
bination of reports from 36 cities can 
indicate the relati\c popularity of net- 
work programs among radio-sel 
owner- in telephone homes. It's ques- 
tionable, however, if the same quanti- 
tative information, even though it 
covers fi\<- months, can give definite 
popularity ol a program or time period 
on a single station in one town. The 
sample is just too small. 



26 



CM HOOPERATINCS 



I 



FARGO-MOORHtA 



OMAWA-COUNCIL BLL 
LINC 




L 



(Nil 



WICHITA 



For stations in only 3 markets, New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, do City Hooperatings provide information 
12 times a year. The only market which gets them 4 times a year, or once a season, is Minneapolis-St. Paul. 

SPONSOR 






w 



lus 



UP 



* 



k. 



1 



heir frailties and misuse 




SPRINGFIELD 



ITY, MO. (r KANS- 



lN |,.ANAPOUsV| I rdm.SSTONr/ _ MMO MO 

ANSVIUEJ^ I 






pHllAOetPWA 



MOWOLS^t^S^KfH^ 




Legend 
Twelve a Year 
9 Four a Year 
^csonvillt'X 3 Three a Year 

LsbuA ® Two a Year 
One a Year 



TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG 



RPUS CHRISTI 



1 MIAMI I 



»bout one-third of the 100 or more cities "covered" in City Hooperatings are reported on only once a year, 
;nd reports on a dozen of them are made only twice a year. The others are reported on three times a year. 

29 AUGUST 1949 



". . . lack of time and inclination" 
prevented C. E. Hooper from 
answering them in SPONSOR. 



More important than size of samj>l<- 
is the fact that these ratings do not re- 
port upon the same thing at all times. 
Not only do programs on stations 
change during any five-month period, 
hut competition to nearly all programs 
also changes. Thus, the rating may 
not only be for one or more programs, 
but it will certainly represent the 
effectiveness of that program or num- 
ber of programs against a number of 
changing programs on other stations. 
Thus, a City Hooperating for a pro- 
gram or time period does not tell a 
sponsor or an agency timebuyer the 
size of the audience he is buying even 
in telephone homes. 

It is a common practice, since C. E. 
Hooper claims that his ratings are 
projectable to all telephone homes in 
an area surveyed, to conclude that a 
rating of five in a city of 200,000 
would indicate an audience of 10,000 
homes for a time period. Hooper him- 
self warns against this type of projec- 
tion. He points out, "A City Hooperat- 
ing is a comparative measurement of 
average station audience taken in the 
five-cent-call zone among residential 
telephone subscribers where typically 
all stations identified with the city can 
be heard. Its purpose is to establish 
the comparative popularity of radio 
programs in this sample. Such popu- 
larity ratings should not be considered 
absolute." 

Almost as important as the fact that 
City Hooperatings are not measure- 
ments of audience size is the factor of 
statistical variation in these reports. 
With a rating of the size of five for a 
15-minute strip, which is reported 
upon from a basis of 400 calls, the 
possible statistical variation indicated 
in Hooper's own chart included with 
each City Hooperating report, is from 
2.9 to 7.1. 

Many stations using City Hooperat- 
ings. and a whale of a number of time- 
bin ers. project their City Hooperatings 
to their entire coverage areas. It cant 
be done. Hooper, in his Code of prac- 
tice governing use of City Hooperat- 
ings, states, "This report is based upon 
city telephone sample only. Projec- 
tions or other suggestions of applic- 
ability beyond this scope are not per- 
missible." 

(Please turn to page 62) 



27 



PART ONE 



OF A SERIES 



Disk jockey: air phenomenon 

Thousands of them with teeliniffiies as different as fingerprints 




When Al Jarvis began spin- 
ning phonograph records 
and chatter on the West 
Coast air more than 15 years ago, and 
Martin Block introduced New York 
listeners to the same kind of program- 
ing technique shortly afterwards, they 
— and a mere handful of others — were 
the sole standard bearers of a facet of 
radio that required the better part of 
a decade to come of age. Today, Jarvis 
and Block, each with his Make Believe 



Ballroom, the former on KLAC, Los 
Angeles, the latter on WNEW. New 
York, are charter members of a "club" 
that includes some 2000 disk jockeys 
on virtually every radio station in the 
United States. 

Perhaps the greatest single reason 
for the success of the disk-jockey for- 
mat, aside from the personality of the 
platter spinners, lies in its flexibility. 
Programs may run from 15 minutes 
to two or three hours: not a few past 



and present shows have been and are 
midnight-to-dawn sessions. The type 
of recordings played may range from 
pop songs to the classics, from hillbilly 
music to bee-bop. from Crosby to 
spiritual singers. The chatter accom- 
panying the disks can be straight, 
comedy, serious, explanatory — or a 
combination of all four. Records can 
be grouped — the top dozen tunes of 
the week or the month or the year: 
musical-comedy songs of previous 




Noted announcer Ted Husing (top) and former band singer 
Bon Bon (bottom) bring established names to platter-spinning. 



Teen-agers and even smaller fry are major factors in disk-jockey audiences 
throughout U.S. WJBK and KFEL stars get solid via autographs, guests. 





HAL MOORE'S "THE BUGLE CALL" ON PHILADELPHIA'S WCAU IS AMONG TOP DISK-JOCKEY SHOWS IN THE QUAKER CITY 



years; outstanding platters made by 
the late Glenn Miller or Tommy Dor- 
sey or Dinah Shore — or they can be 
totally unrelated. Program selections 
may be carefully thought out by the 
disk jockey himself, or they may be 
arrived at via the requests-from-lis- 
teners route. The elasticity and lati- 
tude in programing a disk-jockey 
show are limited only by the normal 
consideration of good taste and the 
imagination of those handling the pro- 
gram. 

Although the past half-dozen years 



have seen the number of platter-spin- 
ning sessions climb into four figures, 
it nevertheless takes more than an an- 
nouncer and a stack of records to 
make a disk-jockey program mean 
something to an audience, a station, 
and the advertisers participating on the 
show. Just as flexibility is the major 
ingredient in the over-all success of the 
d.j. pattern, programing is the number 
one item in the success of any indi- 
vidual d.j. broadcast. Indiscriminate 
material selection and/or aimless, over- 
long talk will have the most patient 



listener dialing elsewhere for his disk- 
jockey entertainment. 

Because of the adaptability of the 
d.j. formula to any type of music, pro- 
graming a platter show can take a 
number of forms. Some turntable 
jockeys group the pressings of one 
name singer or orchestra within a par- 
ticular time segment; others set and 
preserve a soft, melodic, relaxed mood 
through the use of that type of instru- 
mental music; still others feature jazz 
recordings exclusively. Locality, time 
(Please turn to page 44) 



29 AUGUST 1949 



29 




rew Pearson switches hat sponsors but still leads radio commentators with his chin, and sponsor approves. 

Mam likes a fight 

Hat maker leaps into ring 

again with Drew Pearson 



over-all 



I welve years ago. Elias 
Lustig, chairman of the 
board and president of Adam Hats, 
picked up the option for broadcasting 
Madison Square Garden fights from 
a hat chain known as Truly Warner. 
Truly Warner had dropped the option 
because the cost of the rights increased. 

Not many months after that Trnl\ 
Warner was picked up by Adam as a 
business. 

While Lustig is repeating himself 
this year, picking up a program I Drew 
Pearson) sponsored successfully for a 



number of years by another hat firm, it 
isn't for the same reason. And Lustig 
does not have any immediate hope of 
absorbing the Lee Hat organization. 
The reasons for Lee dropping the cru- 
sading Mr. Pearson, who has sold hats 
successfully despite his battles for the 
right as he sees it, is not a matter of 
costs. It's simply that Lee has decided 
that Pearson has become a little too 
hot to handle. Lustig. a great Pearson 
fan, has wanted to sponsor Pearson for 
some time. The Lustig yen for Pearson 
didn't do any good until Lee Hats and 



Pearson agreed to disagree. Then Lus- 
tig signed what he wanted — Pearson. 
He had to take the Weintraub agency 
along with Pearson since Pearson's 
contract is with Weintraub and not 
with either the ABC network or the 
Bponsor. 

Lustig's purchase of Drew Pearson 
is typical of the Adam Hat business. 
It s a Lustig operation, despite chang- 
ing advertising managers and general 
managers. 

It's not unusual for Adam Hat to 
change agencies — it changes them 
when the program mood changes. 
Adam has run the gamut of Madison, 
Buchanan, La Roche & Ellis. Biow. and 
now Weintraub. Madison has lasted 
longer than any other agency, and the 
account has come back to this agency a 
number of times after the 15 percenters 
and Lustig have disagreed. The Madi- 
son agency handled the business of 
Elias Lustig and Brothers, hat jobbers, 
before there were any retail or hat 
manufacturing ambitions. Came a hat 
retailer in the Bronx who couldn't pay 
his bills. Came the same hat retailer 
with an offer. "Take the business." 
Lustig did. 

It happened in 1922. In that year 
Dave Gibson, account executive of 
Madison, now radio director, was 
handling the trade advertising for the 
hat-jobbing firm. Lustig asked his ad- 
vice on what to do with the retail 
store, so Madison had a new account. 
The store started making money: Lus- 
tig bought four more. Dad and uncle 
died (they owned a prosperous pan- 
ama-hat importing firm I. and Elias 
and his brother had some more money 
with yvhich to play. The four-store 
chain become a 14-store operation, and 
it was time 1 1924 1 to incorporate. 
Adam Hat Stores were in business. 

As Adam grew, it found its greatest 
competition in Sarnoff-Irving. a 140- 
outlet chain featuring a low-price line 

Florence Halop bucked Charlie McCarthy. 




of hats at $1 to $2.95. With the 1929 
Wall Street crash, Sarnoff-Irving also 
crashed, and Adam's "Quality at a 
price" theme took over. All through 
this period it was newspaper advertis- 
ing that dominated any battle of hat 
retailers or haberdashers. Billboards 
were used by the leaders, but most of 
the direct selling was in the then direct- 
selling medium, newspapers. 

As indicated previously, in 1937 
Truly Warner dropped the Madison 
Square fights and Lustig moved in. 
The sponsorship worked so well that 
Lustig took over the good locations of 
Truly Warner and the Adam Hat 
chain really started growing. 

When Mike Jacobs, Madison Square 
Garden fight promoter wanted more 
money for the fights, Lustig protested 
and ordered Madison to drop them. 
Gibson, then radio director, protested 
— even went so far as to endanger the 
account for Madison by inferring that 
Lustig was a great hat salesman but not 
an advertising man. (There are very 
few top executives with firms they have 
built up who don't think of themselves 
as great creative advertising men. Lus- 
tig is no exception.) 

The fights ran until December 1942. 
In September 1943 the first Lustig 
brainchild was born. Lustig's theory 
was that people like the old familiar 
jokes. Didn't Joe Miller's joke book 
continue to sell? The old joke program 
finally named Thai's a Good One was 
without a Senator Ford. Harry Hersh- 
field, or a Joe Laurie. Jr. It was also 
without the Can You Top This form- 
ula. It was also without Peter Donald. 
The show was on the NBC-Blue at 
8:15 - 8:30 p.m. against Bergen-Mc- 
Carthy competition. They even found 
it difficult to give away Adam Hat cer- 
tificates for the jokes that were sent in. 
It was an Eddie Pola package costing 
the huge sum of $885 per broadcast, it 
did what could be expected of a pro- 




Adam Hats went in for Madison Square Garden prize fights early. (These boys are Zale and Graziano). 



gram of that cost with no-name talent 
— Florence Halop, Jerry Mann, and 
Sidney Miller. It lasted the 13-week 
contract period. 

Lustig next went for a "talent 
search" program. Star for a Night. It 
was the parent of the expensive Adam 
Hat flop, The Big Break, heard three 
years later on NBC. Star cost around 
$2500, gave a $1000 first prize for the 
best actor in the series. Guest shots 
paid around $75. Paul Douglas, then 



an announcer, was the mc. The pro- 
gram gave aspiring performers an op- 
portunity to play opposite name actors. 
The advertising agency at this time 
was Glicksman. Star produced no up- 
surge in business. 

But Adam Hat business continued 
on the upgrade all through these broad- 
cast fiascos. In 1937 its sales were 
$4,876,650. By 1940 they had grown 
to $8,587,999. In 1940, regardless of 
(Please turn to page 67) 



Paul Douglas m.c'd. "The Big Break," which proved to be a big bust 



Milt Biow (3d from left) handled this show featuring Eddie Dowling (right). 




Three participants in ABC's "Bre 



Hollywood 




Dealer 
cooperative 

advertising 



PART THREE 



OF A SERIES 



I li«' station can make or break 

a sliar<»-tli<»-cost campaign 




Literally hundreds of re- 
tailers are using the air who 
would never have been able 
to try the medium were it not for 
dealer-cooperative advertising allow- 
ances of national manufacturers. I n- 
iortunately, more than half of the na- 
tion's broadcast stations do not know 
bow to handle dealer-cooperative ac- 
counts. Recently the Bureau of Broad- 
Pauline Frederick (right) interviews Mrs. Tom Dewey, cast Advertising (NAB) has been mak- 
ing available to members of the Na- 
tional Association of Broadcasters 
comprehensive file cards which tell 
the station commercial managers just 
whom to see and how to sell this form 
of air advertising. 

It is not the easiest type of local 
advertising to get going. On the other 
hand, once the advertising gets going, 
it frequently means that both the na- 
tional advertiser and the retailer find 
out how effective broadcast advertising 
on a local level can be. 

The problems the stations face are 
varied. At the outset, it's necessarv 
to sell dealer, distributor, district 
manager of the manufacturer, and in a 
few cases the national advertising 
agency. It's seldom necessarv to sell 
the home-office of the manufacturer. 
Most national advertisers would like 
more dealers to use their cooperative 
allowances than actualK do. There 
NBC offers Richard Harkness for co-op sponsorship, are several reasons for this. Except 

32 




in a few cases, where the dealer is a 
natural-born chiseler. local outlets 
using cooperative advertising hit a 
higher sales target than those that pre- 
fer to skip matching their own dollars 
against the manufacturers.' Coopera- 
tive advertising is one way of keeping 
the products of a manufacturer in the 
forefront of a retailers thinking at all 
times. 

Retailers are generally not adver- 
tising men. More than this they 
are generallv broadcast-advertising- 
minded. Thev know the air. realize 
its impact, but fear that their adver- 
tising would rattle around in "that big 
advertiser's field."' and therefore they 
don t use it. It's the stations problem 
to open the airs retail selling doors to 
local advertisers. In this they can be 
helped a great deal 1>\ manufacturers 
who make advertising allowances. Ex- 
cept through information being made 
available b\ BAB. very few stations 
receive anv information directly from 
advertisers about retail cooperative 
allowances. Thus, they are in no posi- 
tion to go to retailers to sell them on 
Inning airtime for which they only- 
have to pay part of the bill. Even net- 
work cooperative-program departments 
know verv little about national adver- 
tisers who allot a percentage of dealers' 
purchases for advertising. This is Bur- 
prising, since over 40' < of the pro- 

SPONSOR 



Ih'alers sponsor Ivading pvvsinmlitivs. 




Veteran Gabriel Heatter has sold many products. Two stars with Bill Slater on "Luncheon at Sardi's." 



grams produced by networks for sale 
by stations have been okayed for 
dealer-cooperative programs of at least 
one sponsor. One program has been 
okayed by 12 national sponsors for 
presentation by their dealers. The 
sales have been made locally, and the 
stations have not gone through the 
routine or reporting to the network that 
part of the advertising bill is being 
paid by the manufacturer and part by 
the retailer. 

The first problem of the station in 
handling dealer-cooperative advertising 
is to obtain the information on the 
manufacturers and their dealers who 
are sharing local advertising costs. 
Once this information is obtained the 
station must start working with the 
manufacturers" distributors. The rea- 
son why successful stations start selling 
at a distributor level is because only 
the distributor knows which dealers 
are buying enough to justify allow- 
ances to pay for broadcasting. In many 
cases the distributor is helpful in other 
ways. He knows that certain non- 
competing dealers in his area are in- 
dividually small but together could 
share in sponsoring a program selling 
the manufacturer's products. The dis- 
tributor thus makes it possible for a 
sponsor to obtain broadcast advertising 
under circumstances which normally 
would produce no promotion. The dis- 
tributor also makes it possible for a 
station to sell time that wouldn't other- 
wise be sold. The jobber also helps 
himself by increasing the movement of 
the product he distributes. It's a three- 
way operation — but one, however, 
which generally has to be started by 
the manufacturer making the stations 

29 AUGUST 1949 



aware that there is co-op money avail- 
able. BAB is doing part of the job. 
but advertising managers are discover- 
ing that to get the greatest immediate 
impact out of a dealer-cooperative 
campaign, it's necessary to inform 
media, as well as dealer and distribu- 
tor. 

Some manufacturers' salesmen are 
effective carriers of the cooperative- 
advertising news to their customers. A 
great percentage is not. Some use co- 
op money to sell more products, others 
don't even tell their customers of the 
advertising allowance being made avail- 
able unless they are forced to by the 
retailers. 

Once a station has sold the dealer 
on going on the air with the advertising 
copy of a manufacturer, its problems 
have only begun. There is the simple 
matter of billing. Bills must be sent 
to dealers in quadruplicate frequently. 
The dealer sends the bills to the dis- 
tributor for okay. The distributor then 
sends the bills to the home office for 
crediting against the retailer's account. 
Stations frequently have to wait some 
time for their payments in a three-way 
parlay such as this. In other cases, the 
dealer pays the entire bill, gets an 
okay from the distributor, and deducts 
the manufacturer's percentage from his 
remittances to the distributor. Many 
sponsors do not like this last method 
of paying their share of cooperative 
allowances. Dealers deduct too much. 
The bookkeeping department screams 
at the involved record-keeping, and 
the distributor is frequently put to it to 
explain to the dealer why he shouldn't 
have deducted so much (he used some 
of his allowance for imprinted book- 



Fulton Lewis reports daily for many sponsors. 

lets, posters, etc.). There are other 
problems, such as a dealer returning 
defective products for credit, yet hav- 
ing used his ad allowance covering the 
returned product. Handling dealer- 
cooperative advertising allowances is a 
human-relations operation under press- 
ure. It isn't any more difficult in the 
case of broadcast advertising than it 
is for other media, but it isn't anv 
simplier. either. 

Certain retailers, like drug stores, 
do not earn large advertising allow- 
ances on any single product. Never- 
theless, a number of stations have sold 
druggists on going on the air and 
worked with them to collect enough 
advertising allowances to justify their 
sponsorship. This is not an easy job. 
It's simpler of course, when the drug- 
gist has a number of stores, or is a 
chain. It has been worked for a big 
single-store druggist. In effect, the 
station becomes the advertising agency 
for the retailer, even though there is 
an agency on the account. Since to- 
day's drug store, is virtually a depart- 
men store, it's possible to obtain real 
allowances on non-drug items, which 
helps. 

Drug-store programs underwritten 
in part by cooperative funds prove that 
any type of retailer, big or small (ex- 
cept purveyors of food stuffs ) . can 
broadcast-advertise with their suppliers 
sharing the costs. The retailer is a local 
personality. When he recommends a 
nationally-advertised product, some- 
thing extra has been added to that 
product. A broadcast sponsored by a 
local retailer is, in effect, an endorse- 
ment of the products advertised. This 
(Please turn to page 69) 



33 




Market 




Coverage 



Basic* 
for timebuyino 



n 



Availabilities 



ft & 




Programing 



Station anil market data help 

to remove iiiiesswork from scheduling 



over-all 



Timebuying is a gamble. 
The good timebuyers. like 
gamblers in other lines of endeavor, 
are successful because they know their 
llo\le. They operate with the law of 
averages in their favor. 

Unfortunately, the timebuyer hasn't 
all the cards he needs, or can obtain. 
Many of the cards that a good time- 
buyer should have are yet to be in- 
cluded in any deck of information. 

The limitations of City Hooperatings 
are itemized on page 26 of this issue. 
These ratings have been and are still 
being used as crutches in the 100-odd 
cities for which they are being pub- 
lished. The criticisms of this rating 
system notwithstanding, it's possible to 
have C. E. Hooper issue City Hooperat- 
ings that answer most of the objections 
raised about them by research critics. 
I ntil adjustments are made, City 
Hooperatings at best give only a pic- 
ture of station acceptance, not of in- 
dividual program audiences — or of 
station-break audiences. A good time 
period on a second-rate station is fre- 
quently far more sales-productive than 
many leading station time periods. 

Theoretically, it is not the province 
of a timebuyer to select the markets 
in which an advertiser desires cover- 



* Naturally, tlii- include- sim>\>or. 



age. In actual operation, the time- 
buyer is called upon to decide both 
the quantity and the quality of a 
campaign in the market involved. Fre- 
quently, a timebuyer 's schedule is torn 
to pieces because of the maladjustment 
of coverage and market potentials. 
Most timebuyers admit that market 
data are a basic requirement for them. 
They applaud Sales Managements 
Survey of Buying Power, although at 
the same time wishing that the infor- 
mation could be made available in a 
more palatable form. "The material 
is terrific," explained one of the girls 
who buys time for a top-ten agency, 
"but it's hardly a 'ready reference,' 
and that's an understatement." 

Most other market-source material 
is kept by timebuyers. but because it's 
seldom complete, nationally, it's used 
only in emergencies. That doesn't 
change the fact that market data are 
basic for timebuying. 

In checking timebuying basics, it's 
impossible to forget the broadcast 
advertising standard rate reference 
volume, Standard Kale and Data. Its 
virtually Impossible to buy time intel- 
ligently without ha\ing the broadcast 
section of Standard Rate and Data 
available at all times. SR&D doesn't 
determine the final station selection, 
but it's invohed in station selection 



34 



time and time again. 

For years, timebuyers have hoped 
for some method or formula through 
which they could have ready reference 
to current station logs. Many of them 
tried to keep files of such logs avail- 
able at all time, but they found it con- 
sumed so much time that they gave 
up the log files in disgust. Even the 
biggest timebuying departments in U.S. 
agencies just couldn't keep abreast of 
current station programing. When in- 
formation was required about a cer- 
tain town, timebuyers picked up the 
phone and requested information from 
station representatives. Frequently, it 
has been necessary for a timebuver to 
ask a station representative to deliver 
information not only about his own 
stations" availabilities, but also for the 
competition in each of his station 
towns. The result has been an infinite 
number of hours spent by station- 
representative staffs servicing time- 
buyers. And after all the hours of serv- 
icing there is a better than even chance 
that the information wasn't current. 
In order to deliver "of the minute" 
data, it would be necessary to have the 
station representative call each of his 
stations and ask them to check the 
competition. This is seldom done — un- 
less the timebuyer is of outstanding 
I Please turn to page 43) 

SPONSOR 




GREATER VOICE. J GREATER HO THE DHROIT AREA 





vt 



Guardian Building, Detroit 26 • Mutual System 




nn 



National Rep. 
Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 



Canadian Rep.'' 
H. N. Stovin & Co. 



29 AUGUST 1949 



35 






N0.1 

BRIGHT SPOT 

in the 

SOUTHEAST/ 
Hllii'liillll 



With Retail Sales UP 7% 
over 1948 and Bank Clear- 
ings, Employment, and Popu- 
lation UP accordingly, 
WGAC-Land is economically 
the brightest spot in the en- 
tire Southeast! 

and 

The $72 million Clark Hill 
development plus the $30 
million annual payroll from 
re-activated Camp Gordon 
are helping make WGAC- 
Land even brighter! 

ADVERTISERS 

are making 

NEW SALES RECORDS 

on 

WGAC 

580 KC— ABC— 5,000 Watts 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

Avery-Knodel 



RTS.. .SPONSOR REPORTS... 



-continued from page 2— 

Commerce Department finds 
video will aid all media 

TV will help industry move record volume of goods, 
U.S. Commerce Department says in "Television as 
an Advertising Medium." Department thinks video 
will "stimulate larger advertising budgets." 

WNAR celebrates 
with gift of time 

WNAR, Norristown, Pa., gave gifts to sponsors on 
its third anniversary, 16 August, in form of total 
of 49 hours of free air time during week. 

BAB issues first 
video material 

Broadcast Advertising Bureau has issued first 
release of dealer co-op advertising service for 
TV stations, covering seven manufacturers who 
who share time cost with dealers for local TV 
and one who offers filmed commercials. 

Radio and TV aid 
Council campaigns 

Annual report of Advertising Council for year 
ended last March shows total of 14,500,000,000 
listener impressions for 50 campaigns delivered by 
radio in Allocation Plan. TV started to use 
Council material. 

News directors urge 
more local stories 

National Association of Radio News Directors 
finds inferior writing and shortage of local and 
regional news to be chief shortcomings of four 
press associations serving radio. 

Tate offers low cost 
transcription programs 

Hal Tate Radio Productions, Chicago, has acquired 
several low cost e.t. programs to be sold adver- 
tisers and stations at flat rate ranging from $2 
up, regardless of size of market or power. 

DuMont will present 
TV allocation plan 

DuMont will present to FCC, at hearings to start 
in Washington 26 September, program to use VHF 
and UHF frequencies together in national TV system 
to give viewers choice of services and to protect 
set-owners from need to buy equipment. 



36 



SPONSOR 




Reminder... for a 







SPOT 
RADIO 



ASK 



REPRESENTING 



YOUR 



LEADING 



JOHN 



RADIO 



BLAIR 



STATIONS 



MAN! 



OFFICES IN CHICAGO • NEW YORK 

29 AUGUST 1949 



/a. 



CANDY 



T 



manufacturer: 



sweetens sales anywhere.. .anytime! 



In the candy business, volume means profit: 
whether you sell nickel candy bars or $2 chocolate creams! 
And, of course, for an impulse item like candy, you can't 
beat the effectiveness of frequent Spot Radio announce- 
ments. Prosperous candy makers know this and wisely 
use Spot Radio to build and hold their volume. They use 
Spot Radio to force distribution in new markets, or to 
bolster sales in old ones. They get profitable results quick- 
ly because they have radio's impact working where it's 
needed — whether in one city or over the entire country! 

If your product needs new volume, it will pay 
you to ask your John Blair man about Spot Radio. While 
you're at it, ask for his advice on any marketing or mer- 
chandising problems you may have. He's an expert in all 
three fields! 




JOHN 
BLAIR 



& COMPANY 

DETROIT • ST. LOUIS LCS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 

37 





The 

Picked Panel 

answers 

Mr. IS row ii 



Simulcasting a 
radio show on 
the television 
screen is an un- 
happy compro- 
mise. A Broad- 
way play could 
he photographed 
and shown on 
movie screens, 
and a movie 
sound track might he broadcast over 
the radio, but certainly no one would 
ever actively defend these as effective 
techniques for making movies or pro- 
ducing radio shows. The excuse for 
the simulcast is one of temporary ex- 
pediency: it offers a radio advertiser 
the chance to edge his toes into the 
chilly and often treacherous television 
w aters. 

The temporary advantages of simul- 
casting? A few dollars can often be 
picked up, provided the sponsor gets 
his talent to work in front of the 
cameras and radio mikes at the same 
time for less than what they would get 
if they did the TV and AM shows 
separately. The discount advantage for 
the AM advertiser buying television is 
small at best, and the advertiser gains 
nothing by a simulcast from that angle, 
since he gets the same discount, 
whether it's broadcast at the same time 
as his radio show or a different time. 



Mr. Sponsor asks... 



"Is a TV-AM broadcast more effective per ad 
dollar than separate TV and AM broadcasts?** 



W. S. Brown 



Vice-president in charge of Advertising 
Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Inc., New York 



just as long as he's on the same net- 
work. He may pick up some values 
from putting his TV show on at a 
time which has become traditionally 
associated with his radio broadcast. 
Probably, both We The People and 
Talent Scouts on CBS have gained 
from this. 

On the other side of the ledger — 
note that fewer and fewer shows lend 
themselves in any way to simulcasting. 
Sportscasting. audience participation, 
and talent shows probably are the 
remaining categories. 1 know very 
little about sportscasting — but as far 
as audience participation is concerned. 
I can speak with some authority in 
terms of both Winner Take All (Chev- 
rolet) and Stop The Music I Admiral 
and Old Gold ) . both of which are on 
television with shows completely dif- 
ferent and distinct from their radio 
versions. Stop The Music, for example 
has developed naturally into a full- 
fledged variety show, studded with 
visual appeals, and different in tempo, 
flavor, and rhythm from the radio 
show, which remains basically a fast- 
moving musical quiz. Winner Take 
All. likewise, gets full-time video 
thinking. Simulcasting either of these 
properties would necessarily compro- 
mise their values — make them less suc- 
cessful — i.e., worth less to the adver- 
tiser. 

Another point: The best time period 
in radio may not correspond to the 
best time period in the TV lineup. A 
show which is beautifully placed in 
radio may find itself, in the TV sched- 
ule, playing opposite such heavyweight 
Hooperaters as Milton Berle. Toast of 
the Town, or Stop The Music. The 
advertiser who can bin independently 
in AM or TV can obviously do a more 



effective placement job. 

To simulcast or not to simulcast is 
an interesting question for 1949 — but 
I seriously doubt that it will prove 
discussion-worthy in 1950. The simul- 
cast has been an interesting, transi- 
tional, and helpful device, but it has 
almost outlived its usefulness. 

It is impossible when simulcasting to 
have both a dandy AM show and a 
dandy TV show . . . something has to 
give. 

Mark Goodson 
Radio. TV Producer 
New York 



This question is 
dangerous be- 
cause it is a mir- 
age. Even the 
short history of 
television has al- 
readv proven the 
thesis which is 
best outlined in 
the wording of 
the George Fos- 
ter Peabody Award which our Actors' 
Studio won: "For outstanding contri- 
bution to the art of television." 

Of itself this is sufficient proof that 
television is not a hodge-podge of 
other art forms such as radio, the 
theater, or Hollywood. Believing sin- 
cerely that it is an art form, programs 
must be conceived, designed, written, 
and produced with television audiences 
in mind. The chimera of a client's 
advertising dollar being more effec- 
tivelv spent in a combined AM-TV 
show is successfully exploded in the 
many painful examples which are 
available today. I't is my belief that 
thev must dwindle and die. 




38 



SPONSOR 




The budget economies which a 
client can effect by sponsoring a com- 
bined program is inevitably outweighed 
by a quality loss. This quality loss 
is reflected in reduced audience, so 
the economy is a mirage. Q. E. D. 

Henry S. White 

President 

World Video, Inc., N. Y. 



It is unsound at 
this stage of tele- 
vision's growth 
to state with fin- 
ality that a simul- 
taneous radio- 
television pro- 
gram is a better 
per dollar adver- 
tising buy than 
separate ' radio 
and television times. Actually, a spon- 
sor of a simulcast is competing with 
himself for audience. Our surveys have 
yet to reveal one television home that 
is not also a radio home. 

In major television markets, such 
as New York, Philadelphia, and Chi- 
cago, the advertiser can reach a really 
sizable audience through television. 
Thus, in my opinion, the television 
potential becomes a serious considera- 
tion only in such areas at the present 
time. In such markets, if an adver- 
tiser can reach a high potential for a 
small enough added consideration, his 
simulcast is a better buy than separate 
AM and TV programs. 

Our Horn & Hardart's Children's 
Hour, which is simulcast over WCAU 
and WCAU-TV every Sunday from 
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., is a good 
case in point. The program enjoys 
this area's top radio rating. At the 
time the show is televised, no other 
station is on the air. Thus, the pro- 
gram catches the entire available tele- 
vision audience. Most important, 
though, the program lends itself ideal- 
ly to television. The radio program 
does not have to be changed in the 
slightest; for, other than a few cos- 
tumes, it is exactly the same show that 
built the radio audience. 

The sponsor in this case — and the 
same should be true in all successful 
simulcasts — has practically no addi- 
tional talent expenditure. He is not 
forced to change a successful radio 
format to meet TV requirements. 

Lit Brothers Department Store, an- 
other of our simulcast sponsors, pre- 
sents Lits Have Fun across the board 
(Please turn to page 62) 




fe&d this Important + factor ! 



WCFL-The Voice of Labor - offers an un- 
equalled plus factor in audience loyalty. There 
is a union member in 2 out of 3 families in the 
greater Chicago area, a foundation upon which 
WCFL is building one of the most responsive 
product-buying markets in radio today 



WCFL 

50,000 watts • 1000 on the dial 

The Voice of Labor 

666 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, III. 

Represented by the Boiling Company, Inc. 

An ABC Affiliate 



29 AUGUST 1949 



39 



North Carolina's 
Golden Triangle 



WINSTON- 
SALEM 



GREENSBORO 




HIGH POINT 



No. 1 Market 

IN THE 

SOUTH'S No, 1 STATE 



288,700 People 



* 



$271, 683.000. Retail Sales 
$41 0.987,000. Buying Income 

* Copr. 1948, 
Sales Management Survey of Buying Power; 
further reproduction not licensed. 



Saturated by 

THE STATIONS 
MOST PEOPLE 
LISTEN TO 
MOST! 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J> 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

AFFILIATE 

R.pr.s.nted by 
HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



CHESEBROUGH 
(Continued from page 25 I 

years. Since a country doctor is every- 
thing from a Dutch uncle to an ama- 
teur detective, the range of stor\ ma- 
terial, within the prescribed framework 
of the show's appeal, was almost un- 
limited. Comedy, love stories, adven- 
ture stories. mystery. melodrama, 
farce — all these are a part of a count n 
doctor's life, and became the source 
for the material for Dr. Christian. 

In the nearly 12 years that Chese- 
brough has sponsored Dr. Christian. 
the program has changed hut slightly. 
Only the addition of the annual "Dr. 
Christian Award" script contest* and 
the application of agency research 
findings to the show have made any 
noticeable changes in its over-all 
handling and merchandising. 

The script contest, which was added 
in 1941, has been a promotional suc- 
cess. Briefly, it is a contest in which 
writers, both amateurs pecking out 
their first scripts, and seasoned radio 
veterans with cross-indexed idea files, 
have equal opportunities at a $2000 
first prize for the best Dr. Christian 
script. At the same time, about 50 
more scripts are purchased at varying 
prices (although the lowest is still 
enough to make the "scale rates" for 
writers) for use throughout the year. 
Thus, in one stroke, the show is public- 
ized and has its choice of over 8000 
scripts — more than enough to find the 
year's supply that conforms to the 
basic appeal of the Dr. Christian show. 

In recent years, McCann-Erickson 
has brought a good deal of research 
findings to bear on the commercials, 
and, to some extent, on the program in 
a continuing effort to improve it. Gen- 
erally speaking, this agency research 
is more a matter of making a series of 
general radio studies, and then relat- 
ing pertinent findings to Dr. Christian. 
than it is a series of specific studies. 

For example, not long ago McCann- 
Erickson's research staff made a gen- 
era